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Insulin Jet Injector For Diabetes Its Advantages And Disadvantages

Insulin Jet Injector for Diabetes  Its Advantages and Disadvantages

Insulin Jet Injector for Diabetes Its Advantages and Disadvantages


Insulin Jet Injector for Diabetes Its Advantages and Disadvantages
Insulin Jet Injector for Diabetes Its Advantages and Disadvantages
While type 1 diabetes patients need to administer insulin into their bodies from the very early stages of diabetes, type 2 patients might need to do the same only in the later stages of their disease. There are several devices which help to administer insulin inside the body of the diabetes patients externally. In this article, we shall see more about one such device by the name of insulin jet injectors. So, come and join us for the article
Insulin Jet Injector for Diabetes Its Advantages and Disadvantages.
What are the Disadvantages of Using a Jet Injector?
Insulin jet injectors are small devices that can be used by diabetes patients to administer insulin into the body even without the need of using needles. Insulin jet injectors usually consist of three different parts which are as follows:
There is a pen-shaped device which is used to deliver insulin
In order to use the insulin jet injectors, the adapter is first filled with insulin and that is how insulin is loaded on the pen. Then, the gauge of the device is set to the amount of dose that you wish to administer in your body. Placing it against the skin, you push the button of the insulin jet injector. With this, the nozzle of the device experiences a gush of insulin which passes into the skin in the form of a vapor. From there on, the hormone passes into the deep layers of the skin and the blood.
What are the Advantages of Using a Jet Injector?
Insulin jet injectors have th Continue reading

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Women in India with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Strategy (WINGS): Methodology and development of model of care for gestational diabetes mellitus (WINGS 4)

Women in India with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Strategy (WINGS): Methodology and development of model of care for gestational diabetes mellitus (WINGS 4)


Women in India with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Strategy (WINGS): Methodology and development of model of care for gestational diabetes mellitus (WINGS 4)
Find articles by Manni Mohanraj Mahalakshmi
Department of Policy and Programmes, International Diabetes Federation, Brussels, Belgium
1Department of Epidemiology, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seethapathy Clinic and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Corresponding Author: Dr. Viswanathan Mohan, Dr. Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, WHO Collaborating Centre for Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention and Control, IDF Centre of Education, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, ICMR Advanced Centre for Genomics of Diabetes, No. 6B, Conran Smith Road, Gopalapuram, Chennai - 600 086, Tamil Nadu, India. E-mail: [email protected]
Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer
Copyright : Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
The Women In India with GDM Strategy (WINGS) project was conducted with the aim of developing a model of care (MOC) suitable for women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in low- and middle-income countries.
The WINGS proje Continue reading

ADA: Cardiovascular Benefits seen with Long-Term Metformin Use in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

ADA: Cardiovascular Benefits seen with Long-Term Metformin Use in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes


Home / Conditions / Type 1 Diabetes / ADA: Cardiovascular Benefits seen with Long-Term Metformin Use in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes
ADA: Cardiovascular Benefits seen with Long-Term Metformin Use in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes
Results from the REMOVAL trial revealed reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease among other benefits with metformin in type 1 diabetes patients.
Atherosclerosis leads to macrovascular complications in diabetes. These complications contribute to the majority of deaths in patients with diabetes. The use of metformin in previous studies have established a reduction in risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. This is one of the reasons why metformin is currently recommended as first line therapy for these patients. However, it is only recommended for off label use in overweight or obese patients with type 1 diabetes to assist in weight loss and to decrease insulin dose requirements. Researchers wanted to investigate the potential use of metformin in patients with type 1 diabetes, to evaluate if these patients could also benefit from the reduction in risk of cardiovascular disease.
An international, double-blind study called the REducing with MetfOrmin Vascular Adverse Lesions (REMOVAL) study enrolled 493 participants over the age of 40 with a minimum of five year duration of type 1 diabetes and at least three cardiovascular risk factors. The ten defined risk factors in the study include known CVD, strong family history of CVD, diabetes duration > 20 years, a BMI 28 kg/m2, HbA1c > 8.0%, current smoker, microalbuminuria Continue reading

News Alert: Blink Health To Give Away $10 Million Worth Of Free Diabetes Medications To Help People Afford Treatment

News Alert: Blink Health To Give Away $10 Million Worth Of Free Diabetes Medications To Help People Afford Treatment

NEW YORK, June 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Blink Health, America's leading prescription drug savings platform, today launched a program to help #TreatType2 diabetes by committing to give away $10 million worth of medication to patients with type-2 diabetes. People living with diabetes who create an account on Blink Health's website or free mobile app, starting today, will receive a free, one-year supply of the three most commonly prescribed generic medications for type-2 diabetes: metformin, glipizide and pioglitazone. The program will also cover these three medications for existing Blink Health patients who use them.
Experience the interactive Multichannel News Release here: https://www.multivu.com/players/English/8117451-blink-health-type-2-diabetes-medications/
As part of Blink Health's ongoing commitment to support people who are living with diabetes, the #TreatType2 program is designed to help the largest population of people managing this condition. Of the nearly 29 million Americans with diabetes, approximately 95 percent have been diagnosed with type 2.1
Blink Health will provide the free medications to everyone until it has committed to spending $10 million on the medications. Any patient with a prescription for any or all of these three medications is eligible to receive medication for free. There is no cost to join Blink Health, and medication can be picked up at over 57,000 pharmacies nationwide, including Walmart, CVS, Rite-Aid, Target, and most independent pharmacies and grocers.
The $10 million commitment is based on Blink's cost to purchase the medication and re Continue reading

Symptoms at Diagnosis May Predict Progression of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms at Diagnosis May Predict Progression of Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers followed patients who were newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for 18 months to classify their disease progression based on 20 baseline symptoms.
With Caroline A. Brorsson, PhD, and Michael Gonzalez-Campoy, MD, PhD
Three major subgroups of newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) experienced different rates of disease progression over 18 months,1 according to data presented at the 53rd annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon, Portugal. The research was part of the Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification project (DIRECT) within the European Union Framework 7 Innovative Medicines Initiative.
Patients with type 2 diabetes are likely to present with varying degrees of insulin resistance and beta cell failure.1 Understanding the heterogeneity of a T2D presentation may lead to more effective treatment strategies for these patients. An underlying difference in pathophysiology may be indicative of a patient’s responsiveness to a prescribed treatment and have an anticipated effect on disease progression.1
Evaluating Differences in Diabetes Progression
Caroline Brorsson, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher at the Technical University of Denmark and colleagues used the detailed clinical phenotyping from the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DIRECT) to identify and cluster subgroups of patients who were newly diagnosed with T2D.1,2 In the DIRECT study, detailed metabolic data were collected on patients newly diagnosed with either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes.2
“Using a very detailed clinical phenotyping methodology, w Continue reading

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