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Innovative Type 1 Diabetes Approach Licensed To Encellin

Innovative Type 1 Diabetes Approach Licensed to Encellin

Innovative Type 1 Diabetes Approach Licensed to Encellin

Encellin, a San Francisco–based biotechnology company, has obtained exclusive worldwide rights from UC San Francisco for a proprietary cell encapsulation technology aimed at improving physicians’ ability to perform cell transplants without the need for immunosuppressive drugs.
Based on ongoing preclinical trials in animal models, the technology – in the form of a pouch approximately the diameter of a quarter, made of an ultrathin nanoporous membrane – represents a significant advance towards the ability to transplant donated cells without danger of immune rejection or harmful fibrosis at the transplant site, while also ensuring that transplanted cells cannot infiltrate other parts of the body.
Encellin first aims to apply this technology – originally developed in the laboratory of Tejal Desai, PhD, chair of the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences in UCSF’s schools of Pharmacy and Medicine – to treat type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease affecting over 1 million Americans, with over 9,000 young people newly diagnosed each year.
Type 1 diabetes is caused by the loss of the islet cells of the pancreas, which normally secrete the hormone insulin to coordinate the body’s use of blood glucose. The transplantation of functional, insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells from a donor has shown clinical efficacy as a treatment for some people with type 1 diabetes, but – like most transplantation techniques – this treatment requires lifelong immunosuppression to prevent patient immune systems from destroying the donor cells. However, these immuno Continue reading

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Handling diabetes in the workplace

Handling diabetes in the workplace

There are around 4.5 million people living with diabetes in the UK and approximately 700 diagnoses per day, the equivalent of one person every two minutes. In the last 20 years, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK has more than doubled and it is estimated that there are around 1.1 million people in the UK who have diabetes but have not been diagnosed.
This week is Diabetes week which aims to raise awareness of the condition, and we, therefore, thought it would be a good opportunity to consider an employer’s obligations and how they can help employees who have this lifelong condition.
Is diabetes a disability?
“Disability” is defined in the Equality Act 2010 as a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on a person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.
There are 2 types of diabetes: type 1, which is an autoimmune condition affecting around 10% of sufferers and type 2, which is caused by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors and affects around 90% of sufferers.
There is no straightforward answer as to whether diabetes amounts to a disability for the purposes of the Equality Act. Each case would be assessed on its own facts, and would focus on the impact the condition has on the employee’s ability to carry out day to day activities and whether a treatment or correction or a coping or avoidance strategy was applied to manage it.
If a condition is treated or corrected, guidance suggests the effect of that treatment or correction should be ignored when assessing the condition a Continue reading

Update: Belgian Biotech Starts Human Trials for a Potential Type 1 Diabetes Cure

Update: Belgian Biotech Starts Human Trials for a Potential Type 1 Diabetes Cure

Update (15/11/2017): Imcyse has officially started recruiting patients to test its therapy for type 1 diabetes. The clinical trial will recruit up to 40 patients across 15 European centers, and the first patient has already enrolled at the Steno Diabetes Center in Copenhagen.
Originally published on 30/05/2017
Imcyse will run its first clinical trial testing a specific immunotherapy that could finally provide a cure to autoimmune diseases.
Imcyse, a Belgian biotech spun out from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in 2010, just announced it has received approval from Belgian and British regulatory authorities to launch a Phase Ib trial in patients with type 1 diabetes. The study is backed with funding from the EU through the EXALT program, which has a budget of €6M over 5 years to promote the development of a cure for type 1 diabetes.
The trial, run in collaboration with the French Inserm, will be run in 18 sites across Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, and the UK. It will be the first study in humans testing Imcyse’s immunotherapy technology, which is aimed at stopping the destruction of insulin-producing beta pancreatic cells in patients diagnosed with the disease within 6 months before the trial, when not all beta cells have yet been eliminated. Results are expected at the end of 2018.
Imcyse develops Imotopes, modified peptides that induce cytolytic CD4 T cells to kill other immune cells involved in the destruction of a specific target, in this case insulin-producing cells, without affecting any other functions of the immune system. The peptides are composed of an e Continue reading

Does Paratuberculosis in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Does Paratuberculosis in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

For an exploration of other possibilities as to why cow’s milk consumption is linked to this autoimmune destruction of insulin production see Does Casein in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes? and Does Bovine Insulin in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?
If it’s in the milk, what about the meat? That’s the subject of my next two videos in this three-part series, Meat Consumption & the Development of Type 1 Diabetes and Does Paratuberculosis in Meat Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?
But if we don’t drink milk, what about our bone health? See my video Is Milk Good for Our Bones?
If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here. Continue reading

World Diabetes Day: Number of Indians with diabetes likely to double in next decade

World Diabetes Day: Number of Indians with diabetes likely to double in next decade

Asians have a 2–4-times higher risk of type 2 diabetes than white Europeans.
With a prediabetes prevalence of 10.3% among adults, people with diabetes in India are likely to more than double in the next decade from the current 70 million, a study by the country’s apex research organisation has estimated.
The prevalence of prediabetes — also known as “impaired glucose tolerance” and a precursor to diabetes — is 1.4 times higher than the diabetes prevalence of 7.3%, according to the Indian Council of Medical Research-IndiaB study of 57,117 adults over 20 years from 14 states and the Union Territory (UT) of Chandigarh.
Around 47.3% of India’s 70 million diabetics are undiagnosed and do not know they have high blood glucose levels that, if left untreated, lead to complications such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke and foot amputation, the study found.
Diabetes emerged as India’s seventh biggest cause of early death in 2016, up from 11th in 2005, shows data from Institute of Health Metrics & Evaluation .
Diabetes prevalence is higher in affluent states and UTs like Chandigarh, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu, but pre-diabetes prevalence, which ranged from 6% in Mizoram to 14.7% in Tripura, was high across states irrespective of income.
Even a state like Bihar with a low diabetes prevalence of 4.3% had 10% people with prediabetes, indicating that diabetes cases would shoot up in the state over the next decade.
Data from 15 states from the ongoing INdia DIABetes(INDIAB)study to track diabetes and prediabetes prevalence threw light on the overall prese Continue reading

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