diabetestalk.net

Innovative Products To Address The Unique Needs Of Patients With Diabetes

Innovative Products to Address the Unique Needs of Patients With Diabetes

Innovative Products to Address the Unique Needs of Patients With Diabetes

Sponsored by BD.
Patients with diabetes have unique needs—for example, they may take multiple medications, including insulin, and they may be at a higher risk for complications from illnesses, including vaccine-preventable diseases.1 By some estimates, patients with diabetes see a pharmacist 7 times more often than they see a physician; thus, pharmacists have additional opportunities to talk about the use of medications and other appropriate interventions (eg, vaccinations).2,3
Becton Dickinson (BD), a leader in diabetes innovation and care, was the first company to develop and commercialize disposable syringes and short-needle insulin syringes.4 Today, BD continues to address the unique needs of patients with diabetes by developing innovative technologies that improve injection comfort and convenience to help optimize patient outcomes. Over the past several years, BD has demonstrated the efficacy and safety of shorter needles and has introduced technologies that further improve both the comfort and ease of injection.5-8
BD INNOVATIONS TO ADDRESS UNMET NEEDS
Area for Improvement: Accidental Intramuscular Injection
Innovation: BD NanoTM Pen Needles
Use of BD Nano 4 mm pen needles rather than longer pen needles can significantly lower the risk of accidental intramuscular injection. Patients who use BD Nano 4 mm pen needles may be as much as 30 times less likely to accidentally inject medication intramuscularly than patients who use 8 mm needles.9 To optimize injection comfort, BD Nano 4 mm pen needles combine 2 technologies. First, the BD Nano pen needle has a PentaPoint co Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Drug for type 2 diabetes provides significant benefits to type 1 diabetic patients

Drug for type 2 diabetes provides significant benefits to type 1 diabetic patients

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- A majority of patients with Type 1 diabetes who were treated with dapagliflozin, a Type 2 diabetes medicine, had a significant decline in their blood sugar levels, according to a new study published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. The results are being presented today by the University at Buffalo researcher who led the study at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon.
Called DEPICT-1, which stands for Dapagliflozin in Patients with Inadequately Controlled Type 1 diabetes, the 24-week study was the first global multicenter investigation of dapagliflozin to test its efficacy and safety in Type 1 diabetes. The double-blind, randomized, three-arm, phase 3 multicenter study was conducted at 143 sites in 17 countries, including the U.S. It was funded by AstraZeneca and Bristol-Myers Squibb, the companies that partnered to develop dapagliflozin.
Participants were 833 patients aged 18-75 who had inadequately controlled blood sugars with a mean baseline hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) -- a measure of sugar in the blood -- level of 8.53. A1C levels for Type 1 diabetics are considered optimal when they are under seven.
Adjunct to insulin
The results demonstrate that when this drug, a sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor (SGLT-2) was administered as an adjunct therapy in addition to the insulin that patients with Type 1 diabetes need to survive, it significantly improved outcomes.
"Our paper provides the initial signal that dapagliflozin is safe and effective in patients with Type 1 diabetes and is a promising adjunct tre Continue reading

Autism risk and maternal diabetes with obesity: What you need to know

Autism risk and maternal diabetes with obesity: What you need to know

Our experts provide perspective on new research linking diabetes and obesity during pregnancy with increased risk of autism
In today’s Pediatrics, researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health report that they found a three- to four-fold higher rate of autism among children born to women who were both diabetic and obese during pregnancy.
The findings raise many questions and concerns. To provide perspective, we talked with epidemiologist Michael Rosanoff and developmental pediatrician Paul Wang. Dr. Wang is Autism Speaks’ senior vice president for medical research. Mr. Rosanoff is Autism Speaks’ director for public health research.
Q: Too often, this type of finding is taken as implying parents are somehow to blame for their children’s autism. Why would you urge against such an interpretation?
Michael Rosanoff: Autism is a complex condition caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. By environmental, researchers mean a broad range of nongenetic influences including maternal health and conditions in the womb. No one environmental factor causes autism by itself. So when we say an environmental factor increases the risk of autism, we are not saying that it causes autism. In other words, not all moms who are both diabetic and obese will have a child with autism. In fact, the vast majority will not.
Paul Wang: We welcome research that helps us identify some of the factors that increase the risk that autism will develop. But as Michael suggests, the vast majority of children exposed to these risk factors do not develop autism. Except in Continue reading

Medication Adherence and Improved Outcomes Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Medication Adherence and Improved Outcomes Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Sarah E. Curtis, MPH; Kristina S. Boye, PhD; Maureen J. Lage, PhD; and Luis-Emilio Garcia-Perez, MD, PhD
Adherence to glucose-lowering agents was associated with a significant reduction in use of acute care resources without any increased total medical costs.
ABSTRACT
Objectives: Examine the association between adherence to glucose-lowering agents (GLAs) and patient outcomes in an adult type 2 diabetes (T2D) population.
Methods: Truven’s Commercial Claims and Encounters database supplied data from July 1, 2009, to June 30, 2014. Patients 18 to 64 years with T2D were included if they received a GLA from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011. Multivariable analyses examined the relationships among 3-year patient outcomes and adherence, defined as proportion of days covered 80% or more. Outcomes included all-cause medical costs, acute care resource utilization, and acute complications.
Results: Although there was no statistically significant difference in total costs when comparing adherent and nonadherent patients ($38,633 vs $38,357; P = .0720), acute care costs ($12,153 vs $8233; P <.0001) and outpatient costs ($16,964 vs $15,457; P <.0001) were significantly lower for adherent patients. Adherence was also associated with a lower probability of hospitalization (22.71% vs 17.65%; P <.0001) and emergency department (ED) visits (45.61% vs 38.47%; P <.0001), fewer hospitalizations (0.40 vs 0.27; P <.0001) and ED visits (1.23 vs 0.83; P <.0001), and a shorter hospital length of stay (2.16 vs 1.25 days; P <.0001). Adherent patients were also less likely to be diagnosed with an ac Continue reading

Foot Care and Exercise With Diabetes

Foot Care and Exercise With Diabetes

Exercise is at the top of the to-do list for managing diabetes. But while staying active is important, so is paying attention to your feet, as diabetes complications can make your feet more susceptible to injury.
Diabetes requires extra foot care because the condition affects your blood flow and your nerves, explains foot health expert Robert Thompson, a certified pedorthist and executive director of the Institute for Preventive Foot Health in Birmingham, Ala. “Many people understand that diabetes can affect their hearts, but they don’t understand why their feet — the farthest point from the heart — are involved,” he says.
For about 40 percent of people with diabetes, complications will include peripheral diabetic neuropathy, nerve damage that affects the feet. With neuropathy, you might not feel when you develop a sore, blister, or even burn. To complicate matters, diabetes complications also include reduced blood flow, which means your body can’t heal as easily as someone without diabetes. That sets up a dangerous situation in which a tiny cut or irritation can lead to infection and even amputation.
How Exercise Can Affect Foot Care
Exercise that involves being upright and putting pressure on your feet, called weight-bearing exercise, can increase the chance of injury to your feet.
“Walking counts as a weight-bearing activity because you have the weight of the body on the soles of the feet,” explains Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, a professor of exercise science in the human movement studies department at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., and the co-autho Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • An Overview of Herbal Products and Secondary Metabolites Used for Management of Type Two Diabetes

    An Overview of Herbal Products and Secondary Metabolites Used for Management of Type Two Diabetes Department of Food Science and Technology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia Edited by: Jianbo Xiao, University of Macau, China Reviewed by: Bhekumthetho Ncube, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; Ying Wang, University of Macau, China *Correspondence: Nata ...

  • Association between consumption of dairy products and incident type 2 diabetesinsights from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer study

    Association between consumption of dairy products and incident type 2 diabetesinsights from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer study We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed ...

  • Calls to address 'staggering' number of Australians losing limbs to diabetes

    What began as a pin-hole sized lesion on the bottom of Alan Tillotson's foot quickly turned into a nasty infection, leading to the amputation of his leg. Like many people with diabetes, the 65-year-old country Victorian truck driver isn't quite sure how the wound first developed. It might have been something as minor as a small stone in his thong. But poor circulation meant the tiny ulcer would no ...

  • Mastery in Diabetes Management: New Diabetes Diagnosis Criteria Req'd for Asian Patients?

    Nina Suda, MD Nina Suda, MD, of Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in New York, spoke with MedPage Today at AACE 2017, the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, about a case study involving a young Southeast Asian woman presenting with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and advanced diabetic nephropathy. Suda's full poster may be downl ...

  • After 20 Years of Watching Diabetes Tech, Kliff Eyes Smart Insulin Pens, CGM for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    An experienced market watcher who has diabetes predicts the key to success will come down to one factor: ease of use. Although current medications can maintain healthy blood sugar levels in most patients who have type 1 (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D), most patients don’t use them correctly and therefore suffer the expensive and unpleasant complications of both hyper- and hypoglycemia. Less than ...

  • I Have Diabetes; Now What? – Guidelines For Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

    There was a time when it was considered not unusual to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at fifty. The poor lifestyle choices, processed diet and nearly thirty years of work-life stress were expected to impact us by that age. These days, people are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at forty and with every passing year, the bar is lowered further, with the millennials now being diagnosed in thei ...

  • CABG Appears Superior to PCI for Patients With Type 1 Diabetes, Multivessel Disease

    The observational findings support existing recommendations favoring surgical revascularization in patients with diabetes. BARCELONA, Spain—Over the long term, patients with type 1 diabetes and multivessel coronary disease fare better with CABG than with PCI, a population-based cohort study suggests. Those findings, reported by Martin Holzmann, MD, PhD (Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, ...

  • This Extreme Diet Reversed Type 2 Diabetes in Up to 86% of Patients

    Type 2 diabetes isn't necessarily for life, with a new clinical trial providing some of the clearest evidence yet that the condition can be reversed, even in patients who have carried the disease for several years. A clinical trial involving almost 300 people in the UK found an intensive weight management program put type 2 diabetes into remission for 86 percent of patients who lost 15 kilograms ( ...

  • A Dilemma for Diabetes Patients: How Low to Push Blood Sugar, and How to Do It?

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with Type 2 diabetes. Surely, then, the way to dodge this bullet is to treat the disease and lower blood sugar. Well, maybe. Growing evidence suggests that the method by which blood sugar is lowered may make a big difference in heart risk. That has raised a medical dilemma affecting tens of millions of people with Type 2 diabetes — and for t ...

Related Articles