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If You Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Make Sure To Avoid These Foods

If You Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Make Sure To Avoid These Foods

If You Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Make Sure To Avoid These Foods


If You Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Make Sure To Avoid These Foods
If You Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Make Sure To Avoid These Foods
Diabetes is a severe disease but luckily, you can control the level of your blood sugar if you choose to consume the right food. The main point is to avoid the food that contains high amounts of sugar. Sometimes people with diabetes consume certain food without prior knowledge about the exact level of sugar it contains. So, pay attention to these 20 kinds of food if you are a diabetic:
If you like carbs, try to eat whole grains such as barley and oats. Instead of white rice, its better to choose the brown alternative.
Also, avoid white flour and all its products like bread, pasta, etc.
Its advisable to always choose an alternative to carbs if possible.
Everyone should avoid trans fats as much as possible, especially people who suffer from diabetes. This means you should limit fried food, including fried meats, French fries, and in short, everything that is deep fried.
Processed meat is generally a bad choice because it contains high levels of sodium. Furthermore, sodium is dangerous considering it increases chances of heart attack and stroke in the case that you suffer from diabetes type 2.
For this reason, its wise to consume food with low levels of sodium. Also, avoid processed meat toppings. Instead of these toppings, use vegetables such as cucumbers, tomatoes, greens, carrots, etc.
Hamburgers are abundant in saturated fats that can contain high levels of cholesterol. You dont have to eliminate hamburgers completely, just chec Continue reading

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City of Hope's New Approach Aims to Cure Type 1 Diabetes in Six Years

City of Hope's New Approach Aims to Cure Type 1 Diabetes in Six Years


CITY OF HOPE SETS NEW GOAL FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES CURE
More than $50 million in private funding aims to cure Type 1 diabetes in six years
A recent grouping of donations totaling $50 million is outstanding, those in the trenches with diabetes said. But only six years to a cure? Really? You lost us there, some claimed.
Dr. Bart Roep, Ph.D., director of the program, now known as the Wanek Family Project at City of Hope, understands that view.
Some people give up [on hope for a cure], and I respect that, he said. He admits, too, that six years is a goal, not a promise. I cannot be confident in the six years, he said. If I knew what was needed to do that, Id do it on one year. But, he feels the pathway City of Hope has laid out thanks to the donations leads the diabetes world on a road to better outcomes, and a place that, in six years, will be significantly better than where we are today.
What the program plans to do is change the entire way we view a cure, shifting from a one-size-fits-all method of research and goals to a system of precision medicine; a way to offer individualized and personalized therapies for people with diabetes much in the same way cancer treatment does today.
The program will draw heavily from a biorepository, something Dr. Roep says will save millions of dollars and many years in helping them embrace the concept of diabetes being unique in almost every individual. Armed with that knowledge they will dig back into human clinical studies that may not have succeeded on a mass scale and look to see if they can help patients on a smaller scale.
For ins Continue reading

10 Foods To Reduce Blood Sugar Levels and Stop Diabetes

10 Foods To Reduce Blood Sugar Levels and Stop Diabetes


10 Foods To Reduce Blood Sugar Levels and Stop Diabetes
10 Foods To Reduce Blood Sugar Levels and Stop Diabetes
Blood Sugar Levels or Diabetes is a disease that can gradually affect your entire system and almost every organ in your body including your kidneys, eyes, heart and more.
Paying too much attention to your diet can make a big difference in whether you develop the disease or experience complications from it. In fact, one of the major factors behind the development of type 2 diabetes, along with many other chronic and degenerative diseases, is a poor diet.
Making some smart dietary choices can prevent or help control type 2 diabetes. Some superfoods can control diabetes by stabilizing or even lowering blood sugar levels when eaten on a regular basis in appropriate portions.
Even if you already take diabetes medications, it is essential to understand that what you eat and drink can greatly affect the way you manage the disease.
Several components in cinnamon promote glucose metabolism and reduce cholesterol. Studies have shown that in people with diabetes; only half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder per day can significantly decrease fasting blood glucose levels and increase insulin sensitivity.
There are many ways to add cinnamon to your diet. You can sprinkle some in your coffee, stir it in the morning oatmeal, or add it to chicken or fish dishes. You can also soak a medium-sized cinnamon stick in hot water to make a refreshing cup of cinnamon tea.
Sweet potatoes are a starchy vegetable that contains the beta-carotene antioxidant along with vitamin A, vitamin Continue reading

Meet the 2017 Diabetes Educator of the Year: Davida Kruger

Meet the 2017 Diabetes Educator of the Year: Davida Kruger


Meet the 2017 Diabetes Educator of the Year: Davida Kruger
Written by Mike Hoskins on August 4, 2017
Earlier this summer when the American Diabetes Association named its diabetes educator of the year, the honor fell to Davida Kruger in Detroit, who's been helping to shape diabetes care since the early 1980s.
Kruger has spent her career as a nurse practitioner (NP) at Detroit's Henry Ford Hospital working with Dr. Fred Whitehouse -- a "Historic Endo for the Ages " who once worked with the famous Dr. Elliot Joslin himself (!) -- and she's divided her time between the clinical practice and research. She was influential in the landmark DCCT study, has authored countless articles and books including the Diabetes Travel Guide in 2000, and overall has helped her profession keep pace with new diabetes technology and treatments as they hit the market.
As it happens, Kruger represents a small and under-represented portion of the 20,000 credentialed CDEs in this country, as only about 4% of them are NPs, who also have prescribing power like physicians. With the 2017 American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) annual meeting kicking off today in Indianapolis, we thought it was a perfect time to share her story here at the 'Mine.
A Chat with Award-Winning CDE Davida Kruger
DM) First off, congrats on the ADA recognition for your work. How did it feel getting that honor?
It was very humbling. Ive been in this position for 35 years and you do it for all the right reasons, for people with diabetes. You stay because youre just enjoying yourself too much to leave. Every time yo Continue reading

How pancreatic tumors could help to fight diabetes

How pancreatic tumors could help to fight diabetes


How pancreatic tumors could help to fight diabetes
New research may change how we think about treatment options for diabetes.
A new study analyzes rare tumorsin which insulin-producing beta cells are produced in excess in order to find a "genetic recipe" for regenerating these cells. And thefindingsmight change the current therapeutic practices for treating diabetes.
Beta cells play a crucial role in the development of diabetes . These tiny cells found in our pancreas produce insulin , and a loss of beta cells is known to be a cause of type 1 diabetes .
Additionally, recent studies have shown that beta cells also play a crucial role in the development of type 2 diabetes . For instance, a study thatMedical News Today reported on found that the release of pro-inflammatory proteins kills off insulin-producing beta cells in the early stages of type 2 diabetes.
But the "problem" with beta cells, medically speaking, is that they replicate in early childhood but cease to proliferate after that.
New research, however, carried out by scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, NY, uncovers a "genomic recipe" for regenerating these key cells.
The study was led by Dr. Andrew Stewart, the director of the Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine, and the findings were published in the journal Nature Communications.
For the new research, Dr. Stewart and team analyzed a very rare type of benign tumor called insulinomas. These are "pancreatic beta cell adenomas" that secrete too much of the hormone insulin.
The t Continue reading

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