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How To Prevent Prediabetes From Turning Into Diabetes

How to Prevent Prediabetes from Turning into Diabetes

How to Prevent Prediabetes from Turning into Diabetes

Jeff Novick has an interesting article on the Principles of Calorie Density which may be of help…….
CAN I EAT ALL I WANT TO AND NOT GAIN WEIGHT?
Unlimited does not
mean unlimited in the sense that you can eat all you want of anything.
What it means : If you follow the principles of the program, especially of the
Maximum Weight Loss program, you will be able to eat all you want of the
recommended foods, until you are comfortably full, NOT STUFFED and still lose
weight.
The reason is due to calorie density. Many many studies have been done in the
last few decades confirming this. If you allow people to eat “ad
libitum” or all they want till they are comfortably full, from low calorie
dense foods, they will lose weight, not be hungry and do not have to count
calories.
Of course, calories still count, but it becomes almost impossible to over
consume calories from the foods you choose if you follow these recommendations.
These are averages for each category of food.
Fresh Veggies are around 100 cal/lb
Fresh Fruits around 250-300 cal/lb
Starchy Veggies/Intact Whole Grains around 450-500 cal/lb
Legumes/Cooked Pasta around 550-600 cal/lb
Processed Grains (even if they are Whole grain) around 1200-1500 cal/lb
Nuts/Seeds around 2800 cal/lb
Oils around 4000 cal/lb
(***According to
Jeff Novick in his full Calorie Density video, cooked pasta is the only
processed flour product that is NOT a high calorie density food. Cooked Whole
Wheat pasta comes in at about 560 calories per pound. Regular pasta about 590
calories a pound.)
Food choices are based on where you are at and what
yo Continue reading

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The Rise of Juvenile Diabetes

The Rise of Juvenile Diabetes

Juvenile diabetes, long regarded as extremely rare, has recently rocketed up the list of autoimmune diseases affecting children. In fact, according to The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), the incidence of this disease increased 23% between 2001 and 2009, with no known explanation.
Juvenile diabetes, now called Type I diabetes, is unlike Adult onset or Type II diabetes in that it is completely unrelated to weight or diet. This type of disease occurs when the immune system turns on the pancreas, attacking and destroying the insulin-producing cells. This autoimmune response can begin at any age.
There is currently no known cause or cure.
Most research to date suggests that Type I diabetes likely results from the combination of genetic susceptibility and exposure to environmental triggers. However, because of the slow pace of genetic change, environmental risk factors appear to be the de facto reason behind the recent increase in disease.
One widely accepted theory is that Type I diabetes may be triggered by a viral infection, such as a stomach virus or the flu. The basis for this explanation is the ‘molecular mimicry’ theory. In the simplest terms, the virus looks like the body’s own insulin-producing cells, so the immune system attacks them along with the infection. Without those cells, no insulin is produced, and insulin-dependent diabetes is the result.
Viral infections, however, are not new to the environment, and therefore, do not fully explain the recent jump in numbers.
Another emerging hypothesis takes molecular mimicry one step further and includes Continue reading

Using Insulin to Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Using Insulin to Treat Type 2 Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, you probably already know that a healthy lifestyle -- including diet, exercise and weight control -- is a very important part of your treatment. You also may need to take oral medications, either a single drug or a combination of drugs. If your type 2 diabetes is not well-controlled on oral medications, you may need to take insulin.
How Does Insulin Work?
Insulin helps keep your blood sugar levels within a normal range by moving glucose from your blood into your body’s cells.
Your cells then use the glucose for energy. People who do not have diabetes make the correct amount of insulin on their own.
If you have type 2 diabetes, you may be able to control your levels of insulin and blood sugar with oral medication. However, some people with type 2 diabetes can't control their blood sugar with oral medications alone and need to add insulin injections to their treatment.
How Do I Take Insulin?
You will need to learn how to inject yourself with insulin, which you may need to take one or more times each day. Your doctor or a diabetes nurse can help you decide which method of taking insulin is best for you and will teach you how to inject yourself.
Taking injections. You will give yourself shots using a needle and syringe. Your doctor or nurse will show you how to get the correct amount of insulin into the syringe and how to inject it under your skin. Some people use an insulin pen, which looks like a pen but has a needle for its point and is prefilled with the correct amount of insulin.
Using an insulin jet injector. This device, which looks like a Continue reading

Surgery for weight loss: A standard treatment for type 2 diabetes?

Surgery for weight loss: A standard treatment for type 2 diabetes?

Gastric bypass procedure should be used more often, experts say
Weight-loss surgery not only leads to dramatic weight loss, it also reverses type 2 diabetes in most people who undergo these stomach-shrinking procedures. In fact, international diabetes organizations now say that surgery for weight loss should become a more routine treatment option for people with type 2 diabetes—even those who are only mildly obese.
Many of the estimated 29 million Americans with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Marked by high levels of sugar in the blood, type 2 diabetes boosts the risk of heart disease, kidney disease, eye and nerve complications, and other serious health problems.
Currently, weight-loss surgery is considered appropriate for two groups of people: those with extreme obesity (a body mass index, or BMI, of 40 or higher; see www.health.harvard.edu/bmi for a calculator) or those only with moderate obesity (BMI of 35 or higher) who also have an obesity-related health problem, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, or sleep apnea.
But even people with mild obesity (a BMI between 30 and 35) who have trouble controlling their blood sugar levels should be considered candidates for weight-loss surgery (also known as bariatric surgery). That's according to a joint statement endorsed by 45 international diabetes organizations, published in the June 2016 issue of Diabetes Care.
Weight-loss surgeries: What are they?
The two most common weight-loss procedures are the gastric bypass procedure and the gastric sleeve. Most are done through several small belly incisions.
Gast Continue reading

Fitbit has a new partnership to help wearers manage diabetes with the Ionic smartwatch

Fitbit has a new partnership to help wearers manage diabetes with the Ionic smartwatch

Image: lili sams/mashable
Fitbit is looking to expand its health monitoring capabilities beyond just fitness tracking, so the company is teaming up with a major medical device maker to help people manage diabetes directly on their wrists.
Fitbit just announced a new partnership with glucose monitoring device company Dexcom. The first initiative to come from the deal will bring Dexcom's data to the upcoming Ionic smartwatch, where glucose levels will be accessible right alongside steps, heart rate, and other stats tracked by the device.
The partnership won't give the Ionic continuous glucose monitoring capabilities on its own — patients will need to connect one of Dexcom's devices to their Fitbit app — but putting the data right on the smartwatch should make keeping track throughout the day an even more seamless experience.
The new functionality isn't just big news for Fitbit fans with diabetes — the company's shareholders have reason to be excited, too. Fitbit shares jumped up 13 percent immediately following the announcement, according to MarketWatch. The prices were the highest for the company since January, when it laid off six percent of its staff and first declared its plans to make a smartwatch.
The Ionic will be released sometime next month, but it won't launch with the Dexcom functionality. The two companies say they're "aiming for 2018" to roll out the connectivity, and more areas of collaboration are also in the works.
Fitbit isn't Dexcom's first wearable deal. The company's tech was also named as an upcoming feature for the Apple Watch at WWDC back in June. Continue reading

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