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How To Combat Heart Disease And Diabetes? Go Keto, Says New Study

How to Combat Heart Disease and Diabetes? Go Keto, says New Study

How to Combat Heart Disease and Diabetes? Go Keto, says New Study

A new study[1] indicates that when it comes to weight loss and regulating metabolic syndrome diseases like diabetes, a keto diet without exercise is more beneficial than the standard American diet (i.e., “standard American eating habits”) — with or without exercise.
Keto diet sans exercise outperforms standard American diet with exercise
The study included 30 adults previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a group of risk factors (like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol levels, and abdominal fat) that put you at risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Researchers put the adults in one of three groups: a sustained ketogenic diet with no exercise, a standard American diet (SAD) with no exercise, or a SAD with 3-5 days of exercise per week at 30 minutes a pop. Over 10 weeks, the results revealed significant changes for the keto group — particularly, as related to weight, body fat percentage, body mass index, HgA1c (a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months) and ketones. In fact, all of these variables for the keto group out-performed the other two groups. The verdict is in – a keto diet without exercise is more potent than the standard American diet with exercise when it comes to weight loss and curbing diseases.
Ketosis helps you lose weight
Ketosis occurs when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar or carbs for energy. That’s why the keto diet is low in carbs, moderate in protein, and high in fat. (Read more about the keto diet here.) For someone who can stand to s Continue reading

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Food Lists for Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Diet

Food Lists for Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Diet

Designed for people with diabetes, like himself, Dr. Bernsteins' Diabetes Diet is a popular choice for many people. It can be used by those who do not have diabetes as a way to eat healthily and lose weight.
As with most diet plans, Dr. Berstein includes a number of foods that you can and cannot eat when following his diet. The following lists provide an easy reference to the forbidden and acceptable foods the author includes in his books.
Forbidden Foods List
On Dr. Bernstein's program, foods that produce a rapid rise in blood glucose are out. Forbidden foods include the usual suspects like sweets and fruit juices, though some of the grains and starches may surprise you.
Sweets and Sweeteners:
Sugar, honey, fructose, corn syrup, molasses, etc, or foods which contain them such as candy and regular soda.
Foods containing other ingredients which are types of sugar. This includes agave nectar, dextrose, sorghum, and many other ingredients that are often "disguised" sugars.
Sugar alcohols such as maltitol, sorbitol, etc., This includes foods which contain them, including sugar-free candy and other "diet" or "sugar-free" foods
Most desserts, including pies, cakes, cookies, etc.
Powdered artificial sweeteners that add carbs (see section on artificial sweeteners in the "Allowed Foods" section).
Grains and Grain Products:
Any product made from wheat, barley, corn, rice, quinoa, rye, etc., are forbidden in the program, including:
Breads
Crackers
Other products made with flour
Cereal, including oatmeal
Pasta
Pancakes and waffles
Sweet or Starchy Vegetables:
Parsnips
Winter squash
Bee Continue reading

Relationship Between Risk Factors, Age, and Mortality in Type 1 Diabetes Patients

Relationship Between Risk Factors, Age, and Mortality in Type 1 Diabetes Patients

Management of non-glycemic cardiovascular disease risk factors may have increasing benefits in an aging type 1 diabetes patient population with long-term hyperglycemia.
The duration of diabetes and how well it is controlled are important factors for preventing type 1 diabetes complications and mortality. Evidence-based therapy and improvement in technology has led to a significantly higher life expectancy among T1D patients. As these patients live longer, risk for cardiovascular disease complications has increased. CVD is the major cause of death in patients with type 1 diabetes and accounts for approximately half of all deaths while the other half is as a result of non-CVD and other causes. Risk factors that lead to insulin resistance, such as high triglyceride, high LDL-cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, high waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and albuminuria are strong indicators of CVD in type 1 diabetes patients.
In the EURODIAB Prospective Cohort Study, 2,787 type 1 diabetes patients were studied over a 7-year period. Mortality causes were categorized as CVD, non-CVD and unknown. The analyses were adjusted for age and the length of time since diabetes was diagnosed and the most important risk factors were determined using a simultaneous and stepwise approach. Non-CVD causes had a higher annual mortality rate at 1.9 per 1,000 person-years [1.4–2.6], while mortality rate due to CVD causes was 1.4 per 1,000 person-years [1.01–2.08], and 1.7 [1.3–2.4] per 1,000 person-years for unknown causes. The results of the study showed that for younger diabetes age, non-CVD risk factors Continue reading

Risk Factors for Diabetes

Risk Factors for Diabetes

A “risk factor” is defined as anything that increases your risk—your chances—of developing a particular disorder such as diabetes. It can be important to remember that risk factors are not necessarily causal, but they are correlated. In other words, the incidence of Type 1 diabetes increases by geography—the further from the equator that you live, the greater the risk that you will have T1D. However, living in, for example, Canada, far north of the equator does not cause T1D. There is also a difference between known and possible risk factors. The known factors are backed by a large amount of evidence and a great deal of certainty in the medical and scientific communities. The possible risk factors lack the same amount of evidence and certainty, but are expected to have this in the near future, after long-term studies have been completed or after the evidence is examined and a consensus among experts is reached. Also, in possible risk factors, other influences—including known and other possible risk factors—may be involved, making the determination of the risk factor more difficult.
Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
There are some known risk factors for T1D. These include:[1]
A family history of T1D. This increases the risk because T1D has a connection to a number of genes that can be “handed down” from one generation to the next.
Genetic background. As mentioned, there are a number of genes that have been described to increase the risk of T1D. T1D is said to have a “polygenic risk” because there is not one single genetic mutation or change that ca Continue reading

Type 1 diabetes vaccine moving to human trials in Finland

Type 1 diabetes vaccine moving to human trials in Finland

It has long been hypothesized that viral infections play a significant role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Researchers in Finland have been investigating this connection for over 25 years and now believe they have targeted the particular virus group that can trigger the disease. After developing a prototype vaccine the team is now moving to human clinical trials in 2018.
Though not as common as type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes it still affects millions of people worldwide. The disease generally begins in childhood and an estimated 80,000 new cases are diagnosed worldwide every year.
Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Recent research suggests that enteroviruses could play a strong role in the onset of type 1 diabetes, with several studies showing that the presence of an enteroviral infection significantly increases the chance of a person developing the disease.
The causal relationship between an enteroviral infection and type 1 diabetes is still unknown, but one study suggests it could act as "a critical trigger to push an already dysfunctional metabolic equilibrium over the brink."
A research group at the University of Tampere initially looked at the more than 100 different enterovirus types found in humans. After pinpointing six specific viral strains that could be associated with type 1 diabetes they ultimately identified the one type that held the biggest risk. A prototype vaccine was then produced and successfully tested on animals.
"Already now it is known that the vaccine is effective and safe o Continue reading

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