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How Positive Self-Talk Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes

How Positive Self-Talk Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes

How Positive Self-Talk Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes


How Positive Self-Talk Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes
Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area.
How Positive Self-Talk Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes
The way you talk to yourself can have a big impact on how you think and feel about managing type 2 diabetes.
Medically Reviewed by Rosalyn Carson-DeWitt, MD
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Self-talk is a conversation that you have with yourself, either in your mind or out loud. Saying positive things to yourself can help boost your mood, get you through challenges, and even help you better manage type 2 diabetes .
But self-talk isnt always positive; it can be negative too. Negative thinking can start a cycle that makes diabetes management really challenging, says Alicia McAuliffe Fogarty, PhD, clinical psychologist and vice president of the Lifestyle Management Team at the American Diabetes Association (ADA).
There are many challenges associated with managing type 2 diabetes. Its common for people who have trouble managing the condition to fall into negative thinking patterns. Approximately 46 percent of people with type 2 diabetes experience negative thinking around managing the condition, according to a study published in Diabetic Medicine in June 2013.
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Reversing Diabetes Through Diet Changes: How One Woman Did It

Reversing Diabetes Through Diet Changes: How One Woman Did It


Reversing Diabetes Through Diet Changes: How One Woman Did It
After a bicycle accident, one woman was forced to change her diet, and she shares how her lifestyle tweaks helped her put diabetes in remission and how shes happier for it.
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Zelda Robinson, a radio-show host turned motivational speaker, helped put diabetes in remission by trading packaged snacks for fresh fruits and veggies.
Zelda Robinson lost two of her older siblings to type 2 diabetes and one to heart disease. But neither her familys history of diabetes nor her own prediabetes diagnosis could convince the Chicago native to make her health a priority.
In my [family] we all ate junk food and fast food. Every now and then on Thanksgiving we would have a real sit-down dinner with fresh food, says Robinson, who still lives in Chi-town and is a media consultant, author, and motivational speaker. Otherwise, I was living on Lays potato chips. And I used to eat Garretts popcorn two or three times a week I was hooked on the mixed cheddar cheese and caramel.
Constance Brown-Riggs, RD, CDE, is the owner and president of CBR Nutrition Enterprises, a nutrition consulting and counseling service in Massapequa, New York. She has not treated Robinson but regularly works with African-Americans diagnosed with diabetes, like Robinson. Brown-Riggs, who is also the author of The African American Guide to Living Well With Diabetes , points out that while di Continue reading

Leeds diabetes clinical champion raises awareness of gestational diabetes for World Diabetes Day

Leeds diabetes clinical champion raises awareness of gestational diabetes for World Diabetes Day

In the lead up to World Diabetes Day (WDD) on 14 November, Clair Ranns, a Pharmacist at NHS Leeds Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) Partnership, is raising awareness of a type of diabetes that affects pregnant women.
Clair Ranns, Pharmacist at NHS Leeds CCGs Partnership and a Clinical Champion for Diabetes UK, said: “With this year’s WDD we’re raising awareness of gestational diabetes in women. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that affects one in seven births1. It’s brought on by, and usually lasts only the duration of the, pregnancy.
“However, if gestational diabetes isn’t managed properly, it can increase the risk of complications during pregnancy and result in a child being at greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in later life. In addition, women who experience gestational diabetes are seven times more likely to develop lifelong Type 2 diabetes later in life2.
“I’d urge all women to have an annual blood test at their GP surgery if they’ve had gestational diabetes in the past, as early detection can slow down the risk of developing the long-term health condition. You should have the test even if you feel well and see your GP as soon as possible if you start to develop symptoms of high blood sugar. Things to look out for include; increased thirst, passing urine more often than usual, feeling very tired, unexplained weight loss, and a dry mouth.
“Women can reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by maintaining a healthy weight, eating a balanced diet and exercising regularly”.
Terry Banks (pictured on the left) developed Type Continue reading

Identification of novel biomarkers to monitor β-cell function and enable early detection of type 2 diabetes risk

Identification of novel biomarkers to monitor β-cell function and enable early detection of type 2 diabetes risk

Abstract
A decline in β-cell function is a prerequisite for the development of type 2 diabetes, yet the level of β-cell function in individuals at risk of the condition is rarely measured. This is due, in part, to the fact that current methods for assessing β-cell function are inaccurate, prone to error, labor-intensive, or affected by glucose-lowering therapy. The aim of the current study was to identify novel circulating biomarkers to monitor β-cell function and to identify individuals at high risk of developing β-cell dysfunction. In a nested case-control study from the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular disease (RISC) cohort (n = 1157), proteomics and miRNA profiling were performed on fasting plasma samples from 43 individuals who progressed to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and 43 controls who maintained normal glucose tolerance (NGT) over three years. Groups were matched at baseline for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), insulin sensitivity (euglycemic clamp) and β-cell glucose sensitivity (mathematical modeling). Proteomic profiling was performed using the SomaLogic platform (Colorado, USA); miRNA expression was performed using a modified RT-PCR protocol (Regulus Therapeutics, California, USA). Results showed differentially expressed proteins and miRNAs including some with known links to type 2 diabetes, such as adiponectin, but also novel biomarkers and pathways. In cross sectional analysis at year 3, the top differentially expressed biomarkers in people with IGT/ reduced β-cell glucose sensitivity were adiponectin, alpha1-antitryp Continue reading

How to make informed decisions from diabetes commercials

How to make informed decisions from diabetes commercials


How to make informed decisions from diabetes commercials
Reviewed by Natalie Olsen, RD, LD, ACSM EP-C
Memorable diabetes television commercials are often shared widely online. Staying informed about the topics they cover, and understanding key things to look out for, may help people make positive choices about how they manage their condition.
Many people have seen the diabetes commercial where Wilford Brimley, an actor with diabetes , pronounces diabetes in an unusual way.
The commercial has been parodied multiple times, which can lead to misinformation about what it is trying to say. However, it may be a useful source of information for people with diabetes.
This article explores what qualities good diabetes commercials should have. It also gives examples of some of the best adverts for people with diabetes.
The discussion that follows highlights things that people with diabetes should look out for in diabetes commercials. This is to help ensure they have the right information to make the best decisions about what they choose to buy.
Diabetes commercials must be emotive and memorable if the viewer is expected to engage with the product or service.
From a business standpoint, a good commercial needs to have an impact on the audience. It needs to inform the audience about the product or service it wants them to engage with.
From the viewer's perspective, a good diabetes commercial will be:
One of the best ways that commercials for diabetes spread awareness is through the use of celebrity endorsements.
Letting a celebrity with diabetes explain a product helps the Continue reading

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