diabetestalk.net

Highlights From American Diabetes Association 2017

Highlights from American Diabetes Association 2017

Highlights from American Diabetes Association 2017


This years American Diabetes Association (ADA) meeting took place in San Diego, California from June 9th to June 13th. The event provides the setting for physicians, industry, and academia to come together to discuss all topics type 2 diabetes (T2D)-related. Among the announcements that were of particular interest were trial results for several current and emerging therapies.
Benefits of Novo Nordisk s Xultophy compared with basal-bolus insulin: Xultophy, a fixed dose combination (FDC) of the long-acting insulin Tresiba and the glucagon-like peptide-1 ( GLP-1 ) receptor agonist Victoza , demonstrated similar HbA1c reductions as a basal-bolus insulin regimen (insulin glargine U100 and insulin aspart), but also provided significantly lower rates of hypoglycemia and a decrease in weight. Approximately two-thirds of patients on Xultophy, reached an HbA1c target of < 7% while there was an 89% reduction in severe hypoglycemic events compared with basal-bolus insulin therapy. Furthermore, the Xultophy group required a lower daily dose of insulin versus the basal-bolus treatment arm. Xultophy is competing against Sanofis long-acting insulin/GLP-1 receptor agonist FDC Soliqua , a fusion of Lantus with Adlyxin. The widespread use of Lantus over Tresiba in the United States should result in strong physician willingness to prescribe Soliqua. However, Victozas dominance in the GLP-1 receptor agonist market, combined with its cardiovascular (CV) benefit, and the new efficacy data showcased during the ADA meeting, indicates that Soliqua will struggle to overtake Xultophy as the market Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Disparities in Diabetes Deaths Among Children and Adolescents  United States, 20002014

Disparities in Diabetes Deaths Among Children and Adolescents United States, 20002014


Disparities in Diabetes Deaths Among Children and Adolescents United States, 20002014
Sharon Saydah, PhD1; Giuseppina Imperatore, MD1; Yiling Cheng, PhD1; Linda S. Geiss, MS1; Ann Albright, PhD1 ( View author affiliations )
Diabetes in children and adolescents is a serious chronic disease. Young persons with diabetes are at risk for death from acute complications of the disease.
In this first report of diabetes mortality among Hispanic persons aged 119 years and comparison with mortality among white and black children and adolescents, there were no statistically significant changes in diabetes death rates from 20002002 to 20122014. Despite the higher prevalence and incidence of reported diabetes among whites than among blacks, blacks had approximately a twofold increased risk for diabetes death compared with whites and over a threefold increased risk compared with Hispanics.
What are the implications for public health practice?
Deaths from diabetes in young persons are potentially preventable. The continued existence of racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes mortality in this age group adds information about Hispanics. Further research to identify health care factors and behaviors that contribute to diabetes mortality in children and adolescents might be helpful in understanding the reasons for disparities by race/ethnicity and focusing future prevention efforts.
Diabetes is a common chronic disease of childhood affecting approximately 200,000 children and adolescents in the United States (1). Children and adolescents with diabetes are at increased risk for death fr Continue reading

Diabetes Inequality in Canada - T1International

Diabetes Inequality in Canada - T1International


6 Oct 2017, 4:40 p.m. in Global Stories by Janet D
The one thing I know about in life is change. I was 12 turning 13 when my father got sick and died. He had been diagnosed with an enlarged heart and was awaiting a heart transplant, so we travelled from Canada down to the United States for him to say goodbye to the rest of the family. It was our last night there, and he didn't make it. I was with him as the paramedics arrived and tried to revive him.
I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes ten days before my sixteenth birthday, in April of 1996. I was rushed to the "big city" from my small town and hospitalized immediately. There I received my first shots and learned how to give them to myself. I was told I should be prepared for a short life. I now know that they were wrong, but it was a scary time. They stressed that I should not have children because I would likely not survive the pregnancy or childbirth.
I think because of the fear they imparted, I struggled a lot with my diagnosis. I spent many years rejecting the idea that I was a diabetic. I didn't want special attention, so I lived like everyone else did in my small town, drinking and taking part in other regular activities that most teenage kids do.
When I set out on my own and started to make a life for myself, I made some wrong choices and ended up in an abusive relationship. Both of us were unemployed, so instead of buying the medication I needed, I paid for rent. Still, he would blame everything on my diabetes and threatened to throw me in a psych ward. That's when the rationing started. First, it was a litt Continue reading

Understanding 30-day re-admission after hospitalisation of older patients for diabetes: identifying those at greatest risk

Understanding 30-day re-admission after hospitalisation of older patients for diabetes: identifying those at greatest risk


Understanding 30-day re-admission after hospitalisation of older patients for diabetes: identifying those at greatest risk
Gillian E Caughey, Nicole L Pratt, John D Barratt, Sepehr Shakib, Anna R Kemp-Casey and Elizabeth E Roughead
Med J Aust 2017; 206 (4): 170-175. || doi: 10.5694/mja16.00671
Objective: To identify factors that contribute to older Australians admitted to hospital with diabetes being re-hospitalised within 30 days of discharge.
Design, setting and participants: A retrospective cohort study of Department of Veterans Affairs administrative data for all patients hospitalised for diabetes and discharged alive during the period 1 January 31 December 2012.
Main outcome measures: Causes of re-hospitalisation and prevalence of clinical factors associated with re-hospitalisation within 30 days of discharge.
Methods: Multivariate logistic regression analysis (backward stepwise) was used to identify characteristics predictive of 30-day re-hospitalisation.
Results: 848 people were hospitalised for diabetes; their median age was 87 years (interquartile range, 7789 years) and 60% were men. 209 patients (24.6%) were re-hospitalised within 30 days of discharge, of whom 77.5% were re-admitted within 14 days of discharge. 51 re-hospitalisations (24%) were for diabetes-related conditions; 41% of those re-admitted within 14 days had not seen their general practitioner between discharge and re-admission. Factors predictive of re-hospitalisation included comorbid heart failure (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.032.17; P = 0.036), numbers Continue reading

Black-ish Hits a Sour Note When It Comes to Diabetes

Black-ish Hits a Sour Note When It Comes to Diabetes


Black-ish Hits a Sour Note When It Comes to Diabetes
The 'Sugar Daddy' episode is in 'collaboration' with Novo-Nordisk - maker of diabetes drugs - and minimizes the ways diet and exercise can help diabetics.
Do you like the TV show black-ish? I do. Its funny, and the acting is outstanding. But even better, every week the show uses its immense platform to educate the public on race issues. I admire the show and look forward to watching it.
Imagine my outrage when I watched the episode about type 2 diabetes entitled Sugar Daddy and realized the show had sold out to a pharmaceutical company. Oops, sorry, the TV network that carries the show, ABC, actor Anthony Anderson and the pharmaceutical company call it a collaboration. (Novo Nordisk sells multiple diabetes drugs and advertised on the episode. In addition, Novo Nordisk is the sponsor of the Get Real About Diabetes website and Facebook page . Anderson is a paid spokesperson for the company.)
The message in the episode completely overemphasizes the role of medication by suggesting that the most important aspect of diabetes care is using injectable insulin. Thats wrong, and thats harmful.
Type 2 diabetes is an excellent topic to address African Americans are twice as likely as Caucasians to get diabetes AND its one of the few diseases that can be minimized and often reversed, if caught and addressed before the pancreas stops creating insulin completely.
The writers, producers and the lead actor squandered their opportunity to help those most at risk for diabetes. Worse, so much worse, the episode mocked Dres first in Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles