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Here's How Many Heart Disease & Diabetes Deaths Are Linked To Food

Here's How Many Heart Disease & Diabetes Deaths Are Linked to Food

Here's How Many Heart Disease & Diabetes Deaths Are Linked to Food

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Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes may be due to diet, a new study finds.
In 2012, 45 percent of deaths from "cardiometabolic disease" — which includes heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes — were attributable to the foods people ate, according to the study.
This conclusion came from a model that the researchers developed that incorporated data from several sources: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which are annual government surveys that provide information on people's dietary intakes; the National Center for Health Statistics, for data on how many people died of certain diseases in a year; and findings from studies and clinical trials linking diet and disease. [7 Foods Your Heart Will Hate]
The researchers found that, in 2012, just over 700,000 people died from a cardiometabolic disease. Of these deaths, nearly 320,000 — or about 45 percent — could be linked to people's diets, according to the study, published today (March 7) in the journal JAMA.
The estimated number of deaths that were linked to not getting enough of certain healthier foods and nutrients was as least as substantial as the number of deaths that were linked to eating too much of certain unhealthy foods, according to the researchers, who were led by Renata Micha, a research assistant professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Tufts University in Boston.
In other words, Americans need to do both: Eat more healthy foods, and less unhealthy food.
The researchers focused their analysis on 10 food groups and nutrients: fruits, vegetable Continue reading

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92 Alkaline Foods That Fight Cancer, Inflammation, Diabetes and Heart Disease

92 Alkaline Foods That Fight Cancer, Inflammation, Diabetes and Heart Disease

EDITORS NOTE:
The body of knowledge is still accumulating, but there is emerging evidence from around the world that supports the benefits of pursuing a more alkaline diet. While an alkaline diet cannot influence blood pH levels, it appears the benefits of the diet stem from the large intake of nutrient dense plant-based foods such as fruits and vegetables. For example, a study undertaken by a team at Norwich Medical School in the U.K. found that an alkaline diet may help women maintain more muscle mass independent of age, physical activity and protein intake (Welch AA et al, 2013). A review article by a researcher at the University of Alberta concluded, “There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine” (Schwalfenberg, 2012). We will continue to follow the story and share the results from further studies as they become available.
With a new diet popping up what seems like every day, it can be hard to keep track or even figure out which to try. The alkaline diet may be a little difficult to get into, but the end rewards more than make up for it. If you’re looking for a diet that helps with more than just weight loss, look no further!
What Is the Alkaline Diet?
The alkaline diet (also known as acid alkaline or alkaline ash diet) is at its core based around the idea of replacing acid-forming foods with alkaline foods to improve your health. As you metabolize foods and extract their energy (calories), they leave an ash as if you were burning them.
A Continue reading

15 Effective Herbs For Diabetes

15 Effective Herbs For Diabetes

It’s a no-brainer that high sugar levels can lead to a lot of health complications. The most prominent and dangerous one is diabetes. Have you noticed how the average age for diabetes has come down to 20 years in recent times? This is due to the sedentary lifestyle we lead and stress at work and home. It is a matter of serious concern and should not be ignored. So, start taking care of your blood sugar levels before it’s too late. And the smart way to do so is to use natural remedies. These ancient remedies are now backed with scientific research that gives us the confidence to share our findings with you. So, read on and find out about these 25 herbs, spices, and supplements, how to consume them, where to buy them, and much more. Let’s begin!
1. Gymnema Sylvestre
This plant is literally called ‘sugar destroyer’ in Hindi, so you can well imagine its diabetes-busting properties. The herb is loaded with glycosides known as gymnemic acids. These essentially reduce your taste bud’s sensitivity to sweet things, thereby lowering sugar cravings in prediabetics. Even those who are already affected by type 2 diabetes can control their sugar levels with the help of this herb. It increases the enzyme activity in the cells, which results in utlization of excess glucose in the body. It can also positively affect insulin production (1).
How To Consume Gymnema Sylvestre & The Dosage
You can consume it in the powdered form, make tea with its leaves or have capsules. You can make tea by steeping the leaves in boiled water for 10 minutes. You can also add the powder to a cup of l Continue reading

New Evidence Suggests Doctors Are Misdiagnosing a Third Type of Diabetes

New Evidence Suggests Doctors Are Misdiagnosing a Third Type of Diabetes

The common understanding of diabetes mellitus includes two types: type one and type two. But there’s a third type that’s been around for a while you may not have even heard of—and some doctors think it’s being misdiagnosed.
Type 3c diabetes, or “Diabetes of the Exocrine Pancreas,” is a third type caused by pancreatic damage. But a recent study found that doctors were likely misdiagnosing this form of diabetes as type 2. But the two require different treatment.
“Several drugs used for type 2 diabetes, such as gliclazide, may not be as effective in type 3c diabetes,” Andrew McGovern from the University of Surry wrote in The Conversation. “Misdiagnosis, therefore, can waste time and money attempting ineffective treatments while exposing the patient to high blood sugar levels.”
Scientists have recognized other types of diabetes aside from type-1 (the body destroys its own insulin-producing cells) or type-2 (the body can’t make enough insulin) for a long time. Back in 2008, researchers worried that type 3c had been under- and misdiagnosed. A new study, published recently in the journal Diabetes Care, adds further evidence to that worry after a search through millions of health records in the United Kingdom.
The researchers found over 30,000 adult-onset cases of diabetes, and found 559 occurred after pancreatic disease. Despite the link between pancreatic disease and type 3c diabetes, 88 percent of those cases were still diagnosed with the more common type of adult-onset diabetes, type 2 diabetes and only 3 percent diagnosed as type 3c—implying at least so Continue reading

10 facts on diabetes

10 facts on diabetes

The number of people with diabetes has nearly quadrupled since 1980. Prevalence is increasing worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. The causes are complex, but the rise is due in part to increases in the number of people who are overweight, including an increase in obesity, and in a widespread lack of physical activity.
Diabetes of all types can lead to complications in many parts of the body and increase the risk of dying prematurely. In 2012 diabetes was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths globally. A large proportion of diabetes and its complications can be prevented by a healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use.
In April 2016, WHO published the Global report on diabetes, which calls for action to reduce exposure to the known risk factors for type 2 diabetes and to improve access to and quality of care for people with all forms of diabetes. Continue reading

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