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Hard Lessons: The American Diabetes Association Social Media Photo Ban

Hard Lessons: The American Diabetes Association Social Media Photo Ban

Hard Lessons: The American Diabetes Association Social Media Photo Ban


Hard Lessons: The American Diabetes Association Social Media Photo Ban
This past weekend, the American Diabetes Association set off a tweetstorm when it forbade the sharing of photos via Twitter during its 77th Scientific Sessions . The intention was to protect scientific research that had not yet been published but might be shared in sessions and subsequently disseminated on social media. Yet the far-reaching ban had a more deleterious effect. Their media blackout was decried as a strong arm tactic , and attendees were infuriated they couldnt share what they had learned. Others encouraged the Association to join the 21st century while others shared political cartoons and memes. It became the biggest story of the Sessionslarger than the research and progress itself.
Sandeep Thekkepat said it best: @AmDiabetesAssn disservice to professionals and people with diabetes by restrictive social media policy. This is THE story of #2017ADA
A tweet shared by Amanda Jane Saunders-Johnston regarding the decision.
As I shared on my own Twitter , it is my opinion that conference, class, and course tweets are important for engagement, learning, interaction & networking. Thats part of why the very idea of the shared conference hashtag came about, and why its so valuable. This theory has been preliminarily backed up by a recent study done by Hendrick Borgmann, MD, Sasha DeWitt, MD, and others. Conducted at two separate urological conferences, the research found that,
Among 312 total respondents, the greatest perceived benefits of Twitter among users were for networking (97%) and Continue reading

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5 Natural Diabetes Cures That You Need to Know

5 Natural Diabetes Cures That You Need to Know


5 Natural Diabetes Cures That You Need to Know
With over three million people dying annually because of diabetes complications, it is just natural that many people are curious about natural cures for diabetes. Even before the manufacture of anti-diabetes medication, primarily Metformin and Sulfonylureas, cultures all over the world relied on traditional herbal medicines to manage diabetes and avert its complications.
Weve gathered some of the most known and trusted natural cures that people have been using for centuries before the advent of the medication we use now.
A well-known superfood that has been traditionally used as an anti-diabetic for years, the bitter gourd is infamous for its bitter taste. Despite this, it is widely consumed in Southeast Asia and in India. Belonging to the Cucurbitaceae family and the genus Momordica, this vegetable is related to the watermelon, squash, cantaloupe, and cucumber. Green with warty skin, the bitter gourd turns orange and splits open at the bud end when it ripens. The most important part of the bitter gourd, though, is polypeptide-p or plant insulin . This compound can only be found in the bitter gourd and it naturally normalizes the bodys blood sugar.
Including a lot of bitter gourd in your diet might not be enough, though, to manage diabetes naturally. It would be advisable if youll also take herbal food supplements for diabetes that has bitter gourd as the main component. Since the supplements have the concentrated plant insulin, your body will be able to directly receive the p-insulin that it needs in relation to the incr Continue reading

Can Ampalaya or Bitter Melon Treat Diabetes? Or Prevent Cancer?

Can Ampalaya or Bitter Melon Treat Diabetes? Or Prevent Cancer?


Can Ampalaya or Bitter Melon Treat Diabetes? Or Prevent Cancer?
October 7, 2017 Natural Healing Comments: 1
So many diabetics are hopeful that ampalaya can cure diabetes but to put the record straight, ampalaya cannot cure diabetes, it can only control the disease.
The scientific name of ampalaya is Momordica charantia. It is known as bitter gourd or bitter melon but in the Philippines, it is called ampalaya.
Ampalaya is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family where the squashes, gourds, and melons also belong. That is why it is called bitter melon or bitter gourd. It is considered one of the most bitter fruits which also have culinary benefits.
Ampalaya has that bitter taste due to the presence of momordicin, a substance that is sometimes referred to as plant insulin which gives ampalaya its blood-sugar-lowering properties.
A number of scientific studies on the effect of ampalaya on blood sugar levels have been done.
One of these studies is a 10-year trial undertaken by the Philippine Council for Health Research and Development (PCHRD). The study compared ampalaya leaves with the anti-diabetes drug glibenclamide.
The study results showed that 100 milligrams per kilo dose per day of ampalaya could be equal to 2.8 milligrams of the anti-diabetes drug glibenclamide.
This means that the action of ampalaya on blood sugar could be the same to the action of gibenclamide.
Because of this study, the Philippine Department of Health (DoH) has raised the status of ampalaya from a nutritional supplement to a real medicine.
The clinical studies on the sugar lowering effect of Continue reading

High rates of scanning with Abbott′s FreeStyle Libre system linked to improved glucose control in diabetes patients

High rates of scanning with Abbott′s FreeStyle Libre system linked to improved glucose control in diabetes patients

Abbott today announced the results of real-world use data showing that people who scan more frequently using Abbott′s FreeStyle® Libre system spend less time in hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) or hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) while having improved average glucose levels. According to the data, more than 50,000 people with diabetes using the FreeStyle Libre system checked their glucose levels an average of 16 times per day—which is three times more than the minimum recommended U.S. and European guidelines for testing with the traditional fingerstick technique. The data show that higher rates of scanning with the FreeStyle Libre system were found to be strongly associated with improved glucose control.
"There is now substantial evidence from both real-world usage and clinical studies that reaffirms the powerful impact of the FreeStyle Libre system," said Jared Watkin, senior vice president, Diabetes Care, Abbott. "The FreeStyle Libre system is changing how diabetes has been managed for decades, with one simple swipe. Most importantly, we’re doing that by empowering patients with the information that they need to take action themselves, helping people living with diabetes live fuller, healthier lives."
Abbott′s FreeStyle Libre system consists of a small, round sensor worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 14 days, which measures glucose every minute in interstitial fluid through a small filament that is inserted just under the skin and held in place with a small adhesive pad.
The FreeStyle Libre reader is scanned over the sensor to get a glucose result in les Continue reading

Continuous glucose monitoring for pregnant women with type 1 diabetes reduces risk of complications for newborns

Continuous glucose monitoring for pregnant women with type 1 diabetes reduces risk of complications for newborns


Continuous glucose monitoring for pregnant women with type 1 diabetes reduces risk of complications for newborns
Authors say that continuous glucose monitoring should be offered to all pregnant women with type 1 diabetes to reduce risk of complications for newborn babies
For women with type 1 diabetes, monitoring blood sugar levels continuously during pregnancy via an implanted device helps better manage the disease, and improves birth outcomes compared to traditional finger-prick tests, according to a new randomized trial published in The Lancet and presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) conference.
One in two newborns of women with type 1 diabetes may face complications as a result of being exposed to maternal high blood sugar levels, and there has been limited progress, with these birth outcomes not improving in the past 3-4 decades.
Complications can include congenital anomaly, premature birth, stillbirth, need for intensive care after birth, and being larger than average at birth for the baby, and higher rates of pre-eclampsia and Caesarean section for the mother.
The authors of the international trial say that, as a result of these findings, this type of monitoring should now be offered to all pregnant women with type 1 diabetes to help improve outcomes for newborns.
In the study, researchers trialled an implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device that gives 288 glucose recordings per day, allowing users to recognise and respond to changes in blood sugar levels as they occur. They compared this with traditional monitori Continue reading

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