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Guava Leaf Tea Fights Cancer, Lowers Cholesterol And Treats Diabetes

Guava Leaf Tea Fights Cancer, Lowers Cholesterol and Treats Diabetes

Guava Leaf Tea Fights Cancer, Lowers Cholesterol and Treats Diabetes


Guava Leaf Tea Fights Cancer, Lowers Cholesterol and Treats Diabetes
Posted Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 11:08am EDT
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You probably heard about Guava which is well known tropical fruit throughout the world. However, have you heard about its leaves which show even more benefits? The young leaves of the guava evergreen tree have been used for ages in traditional medicine in tropical countries for a variety of health conditions. The leaves of guava are even more beneficial than the fruit. In fact, according to research issued in the Journal of Food and Chemistry Continue reading

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8 Facts About Cannabis and Diabetes

8 Facts About Cannabis and Diabetes


Home Page Blog Medical 8 Facts About Cannabis and Diabetes
Medical Marijuana For Diabetes Is Cutting Edge Right Now
Posted by DanaSmith on Wednesday Jan 3, 2018
Diabetes is one of the leading causes of deaths in the world, with over 5 million people dying from this condition yearly despite medical advancements and pharmaceutical drugs. Now, patients with diabetes can turn to cannabis as a natural and safe way of managing this condition, largely in part because of its potent anti-inflammatory properties.
Here are 8 facts about cannabis and diabetes read on and save a life (maybe yours):
Consuming cannabis regularly can help prevent and treat diabetes. A 2013 study published in the American Journal of Medicine analyzed the impact of cannabis on glucose, insulin resistance, and fasting insulin. The researchers found that current cannabis users had higher HDL levels as well as lower levels of insulin resistance while participants who used cannabis at some point in their lives, but not current users, had similar results. According to an interview with Murray Mittleman, lead researcher of the study: The most important finding is that current users of marijuana appeared to have better carbohydrate metabolism than non-users. Their fasting insulin levels were lower, and they appeared to be less resistant to the insulin produced by their body to maintain a normal blood-sugar level.
Cannabis users have better insulin resistance. Poor insulin resistance is the primary cause for the progression of type 2 diabetes. The same 2013 study revealed that cannabis co Continue reading

Why diabetes has made me detest clean eating even more

Why diabetes has made me detest clean eating even more


I bought a plumptious white peach on Sunday and perched it on the windowsill facing my desk so it could bask in my admiration. I tried to find pleasure in the anticipation of eating it but the important part that a delay in eating must be voluntarily self-imposed to be truly enjoyable- has gone.
I was diagnosed with diabetes six weeks ago. My days of eating peaches without care are over.
These days I have to perform carb maths, tapping on my phone with fingers sore from multiple pinpricks. (How did people in the olden days cope without apps to help?) I conduct an internal dialogue with my pancreas and liver (please let me eat this!) in front of market stalls or rammed up against a seething, hungry mass of humanity at food festivals. I hang around online food sites at 2 am in the morning when I am fitful from hypoglycemia or its hyper-odious sibling and torture myself with the Things I Cannot Have. Its a form of self harm, I know, but it serves as a necessary part of accepting what has happened to me as I push myself up against my diagnosis. I can no longer leave any room for mistakes in a body that has become as confounding and wily as an old coyote.
The immutable reality of peach carbs (14-17g) meant it would have to replace the slice of wholemeal toast I prefer for breakfast and wouldnt do at all as a mid-morning snack; I ensured I drank lots of water with it; I ate it slowly; I did ALL THE GODDAMN SENSIBLE DIABETIC THINGS.
By 11 a.m my blood sugars had shot up to ridiculous levels and what felt like a million tiny grains of sugar were needling me underneath my ski Continue reading

Messing With Our Body Clocks Causes Weight Gain And Diabetes : Shots - Health News : NPR

Messing With Our Body Clocks Causes Weight Gain And Diabetes : Shots - Health News : NPR


Research that helped discover the clocks running in every cell in our bodies earned three scientists a Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday.
"With exquisite precision, our inner clock adapts our physiology to the dramatically different phases of the day," the Nobel Prize committee wrote of the work of Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young. "The clock regulates critical functions such as behavior, hormone levels, sleep, body temperature and metabolism."
We humans are time-keeping machines. And it seems we need regular sleeping and eating schedules to keep all of our clocks in sync.
Studies show that if we mess with the body's natural sleep-wake cycle say, by working an overnight shift, taking a trans-Atlantic flight or staying up all night with a new baby or puppy we pay the price.
Our blood pressure goes up, hunger hormones get thrown off and blood sugar control goes south.
We can all recover from an occasional all-nighter, an episode of jet lag or short-term disruptions.
But over time, if living against the clock becomes a way of life, this may set the stage for weight gain and metabolic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes.
"What happens is that you get a total de-synchronization of the clocks within us," explains Fred Turek , a circadian scientist at Northwestern University. "Which may be underlying the chronic diseases we face in our society today."
So consider what happens, for instance, if we eat late or in the middle of the night. The master clock which is set by the light-dark cycle is cuing all other clocks in the body that it's night. Time t Continue reading

Diabetes & Your Feet: 5 Things You Need to Do Right Now to Prevent Ulcers, Infection, Amputation

Diabetes & Your Feet: 5 Things You Need to Do Right Now to Prevent Ulcers, Infection, Amputation

If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, your doctor has undoubtedly told you to pay special attention to your feet, since they are prone to infections, ulcers and worse. While it probably seems like enough work to track your blood sugar levels, keeping your feet healthy is crucial, too.
If you're not convinced, consider these scary statistics:
• Foot ulcers, common in those with diabetes, may heal but are very likely to reoccur.
• The risk of an uninfected diabetic foot ulcer becoming infected is about 40%.
• The Charcot foot, a condition of severe deformity linked with diabetes, can lead to amputation—and three months or more of difficult movement. Other diabetes-related foot problems can also lead to amputation.1
• Every 30 seconds, a lower limb is lost as a consequence of diabetes. 1,2
As somber as those facts are, patients can be proactive about foot health with a number of simple steps, according to podiatric specialists talking at a seminar on the Diabetic Foot at the American Diabetes Association 77th Scientific Sessions in San Diego. Here are five suggestions.
#1. Understand Neuropathy
Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is, unfortunately, common in those with diabetes. It's defined as damage to nerves in your feet, lower legs, hands and elsewhere.
However, patients often don't truly understand what neuropathy is, says Andrew J.M. Boulton, FRCP, professor of medicine at the University of Manchester. "They have a strong vascular connotation, so they think it must have to do with circulation," Dr. Boulton tells Endocrine Web. They think, ''My foot is warm, it does Continue reading

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