diabetestalk.net

Got Pre-diabetes? Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Got pre-diabetes? Here's five things to eat or avoid to prevent type 2 diabetes

Got pre-diabetes? Here's five things to eat or avoid to prevent type 2 diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk.
Diabetes Prevention Programs
Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10% and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58% over two years.
We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods. They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6% more than the group who didn't change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5kg and better blood sugar regulation.
This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, including two million Australians, who have pre-diabetes.
The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and t Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Diabetes and Diet

Diabetes and Diet

There is no one diet for all people with diabetes. There is, however, a "recipe" for eating healthfully that is similar to recommendations for heart health, cancer prevention and weight management.
To successfully manage diabetes, you need to understand how foods and nutrition affect your body. Food portions and food choices are important. Carbohydrates, fat and protein need to be balanced to ensure blood sugar levels stay as stable as possible. (This is particularly important for people with Type 1 diabetes.)
The keys to a healthy eating plan are:
Eat meals and snacks regularly (at planned times).
Eat about the same amount of food at each meal or snack.
Choose healthful foods to support a healthy weight and heart.
Put Together a Plan
You need a registered dietitian nutritionist on your team who will work with you to put together an individualized eating plan that takes into account your food preferences, level of physical activity and lifestyle.
Your RDN will work with you and your physician to strike the right balance between your eating plan and any diabetes medications you take.
Plan Healthy Meals
Good health depends on eating a variety of foods that contain the right amounts of carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats, as well as vitamins, minerals, fiber and water. If you have diabetes, a healthy daily eating plan includes:
Starchy foods including breads, cereals, pasta, rice, other whole grains and starchy vegetables such as beans, corn and peas
Non-starchy vegetables including carrots, green beans and broccoli
Fruits
Lean meat, fish, poultry, low-fat cheese and tofu
Continue reading

Managing Your Blood Glucose Ups and Downs

Managing Your Blood Glucose Ups and Downs

High blood glucose is the defining characteristic of diabetes: It’s what leads to a diagnosis of diabetes, and it’s what can lead to long-term diabetes complications if sustained over time. Consequently, the medicines prescribed to treat diabetes lower blood glucose in one way or another. Exercise, too, usually lowers blood glucose, which is one of the reasons it’s an important part of a diabetes treatment regimen. But too-low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia, is no good, either, since it can cause you to lose consciousness.
“Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other.” — Abraham Lincoln
Food raises blood glucose level, and certain other things can, too, such as illness and other forms of physical or mental stress. The challenge of managing diabetes, therefore, is to balance all of the things that can raise blood glucose (including the diabetes itself) with those that can lower it, so that your blood glucose level stays within a fairly narrow range. Staying in this range will not only help to prevent complications, but it will enable you to feel your best, both mentally and physically.
So what is that range, and how do you stay there?
Recommendations for blood glucose targets
Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have published recommendations regarding target blood glucose ranges. The ADA recommends aiming for a blood glucose level between 70 and 130 mg/dl before meals and a level lower than 180 mg/dl two hours after the start of meals. The ACE recommends a goal o Continue reading

Complications of Diabetes – A Disease Affecting All Organs

Complications of Diabetes – A Disease Affecting All Organs

We’re treating people with type 2 diabetes completely wrong – and it’s harming every organ in their bodies.
Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may be the hallmark of diabetes, but does not cause most of the morbidity (the harm of the disease). Blood glucose is fairly easily controlled by medication, but this does not prevent the long-term complications. Despite blood glucose control, damage occurs to virtually every organ system.
It would be difficult to find a single organ system NOT affected by diabetes. These complications are generally classified as either microvascular (small blood vessels) or macrovascular (large blood vessels).
Certain organs, such as the eyes, kidneys and nerves are predominantly perfused by small blood vessels. Chronic damage to these small blood vessels causes failure of these organs. Damage to larger blood vessels results in narrowing called atherosclerotic plaque. When this plaque ruptures, it triggers an inflammatory reaction and blood clots that cause heart attacks and strokes. When blood flow is impaired to the legs, it may cause gangrene due to reduced circulation.
There are other complications do not fall neatly into this simple categorization. A variety of diabetic complications are not obviously caused by injured blood vessels. These would include skin conditions, fatty liver disease, infections, polycystic ovarian syndromes, Alzheimer’s disease and cancer.
Microvascular Complications
Retinopathy
Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in the United States, according to the Center for Disease Control in 2011.
Eye dis Continue reading

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs of Diabetes

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs of Diabetes

Besides the well-known symptoms—like constant thirst and a frequent need to pee—here are a few other subtle signals that something may be wrong.
Many people who develop type 2 diabetes have no idea they’re sick until a blood test shows abnormal blood sugar levels, or until their disease progresses and serious complications start to occur. “For the most part, diabetes is silent and insidious,” says Ronald Tamler, MD, director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute. “Most of the time people have no symptoms early on.”
In some cases, though, there are sneaky signs. Some early diabetes symptoms are well-known: constant thirst, excessive urination, or sudden weight gain or loss, for example. Others, like the ones below, are more easily missed—by medical professionals and patients alike. If you’re experiencing any of these, be sure to bring them up with your doctor.
Inflamed or infected gums
Periodontitis—also known as gum disease—may be an early sign of type 2 diabetes, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. The study found that people with gum disease, especially those with severe cases, had higher rates of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) and pre-diabetes than those without.
The connection between gum disease and diabetes isn’t new, says Dr. Tamler, and it appears to go both ways: Having either condition seems to increase the risk of developing the other. “Inflammation caused by gum disease eggs on the same factors that are responsible for high blood sugar that cause diabetes,” he says. Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles