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Ginger Shows Promise As A Cancer And Diabetes Fighter

Ginger Shows Promise as a Cancer and Diabetes Fighter

Ginger Shows Promise as a Cancer and Diabetes Fighter

Ginger is one spice that I recommend keeping on hand in your kitchen at all times. Not only is it a wonderful addition to your cooking (especially paired with garlic) but it also has enough medicinal properties to fill several books.
Fresh ginger root keeps well in your freezer. If you find yourself nauseous or with an upset stomach, mince up a small amount (about the size of your fingernail) and swallow it. You’ll be amazed at the relief it provides. Yet this is only the beginning…
Therapeutic Benefits of Ginger Noted for Thousands of Years
The medicinal uses of ginger have been known for at least 2,000 years in cultures all around the world. Although it originated in Asia, ginger is valued in India, the Middle East, Africa, and the Caribbean, among other regions.
The most commonly used medicinal part of the plant is the rhizome, the root-like stem that grows underground. It’s a rich source of antioxidants including gingerols, shogaols, zingerones, and more. Ginger actually has broad-spectrum antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, and anti-parasitic properties, to name just several of its more than 40 pharmacological actions.1
Ginger Has Anti-Inflammatory Properties That May Rival Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)
For instance, ginger (like many natural plant compounds) is anti-inflammatory, which makes it a valuable tool for pain relief. In 2001, research showed that ginger extract helped reduce knee pain in people with osteoarthritis.2
In 2013, a study also found that women athletes taking three grams of ginger or cinnamon daily (that’s less than one Continue reading

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3 Things You May Not Know About Diabetes and Hot Weather

3 Things You May Not Know About Diabetes and Hot Weather

The arrival of warmer temperatures can mean a new set of concerns if you have diabetes.
Even if you don't experience any physical discomfort during hot weather, you should be aware that people with chronic conditions - and those taking medications to manage these conditions - have an increased risk of weather-related complications.
Here are three things you may not know about managing diabetes in hot weather:
1. Your supplies can be dangerously affected.
The effectiveness of your diabetes medications or insulin can be affected in warm weather. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, temperatures above 80 degrees F will pose the biggest threat to your medications or testing supplies.
Humidity should also be taken into account, the CDC advises, as conditions with over 40 percent humidity in over 80 degree heat could degrade your supplies and compromise how well they work.
Don't store your medications or supplies in direct sunlight or in the car. Try to find a cool, dark place to put them - but avoid the freezer. You can store them in a cooler, but avoid putting them directly in contact with an ice pack.
2. You may be predisposed to heat-related conditions.
Diabetics are generally more at risk for heat-related illnesses, like dehydration or heat stroke.
According to the Endocrine Society, diabetics have impaired sweating abilities, which can lead to hormonal fluctuations in heat that will cause more dire consequences for them than for others.
3. You're more prone to hypoglycemia and dehydration.
If you're taking medication to help you lower your blood suga Continue reading

How to Help a Loved One Adjust to a New Diabetes Diagnosis

How to Help a Loved One Adjust to a New Diabetes Diagnosis

Adjusting to a medical diagnosis that affects lifestyle choices and one’s sense of self can be overwhelming at first.
If someone you care about has recently been diagnosed with diabetes, you will naturally want to help them accept and make necessary changes. Knowing what to expect and about proven ways to assist your loved one can make the adjustment easier for you.
Feelings and Attitudes
Feelings. As you and your loved one adjust to the diabetes diagnosis, you may both experience a cascade of feelings including sadness, grief, anger, fear, anxiety, denial or emotional numbness. Acknowledge and accept the feelings, whatever they might be, since there is no right or wrong way to feel. Balance them by reminding yourself that diabetes management is typically overwhelming at first, but eventually becomes part of the daily routine.
Be in the Know. Help your loved one by learning about diabetes. This is important whether you are caring for a child with the diagnosis or helping an adult learn to manage it. Asking the doctor for educational materials and visiting the American Diabetes Association’s or Mayo Clinic’s websites (diabetes.org, mayoclinic.org) are good ways to get your education started.
The Tortoise Wins the Race. A diagnosis such as diabetes can send shock waves through a family. Though there may be a sense of urgency to learn and change everything right away, give yourself and others time to process thoughts and feelings, and talk about them. People tend to adjust to unwanted change more readily when feelings and concerns are shared with others.
Think Small. Sma Continue reading

Statin Scam Exposed: Cholesterol Drugs Cause Rapid Aging, Brain Damage, and Diabetes

Statin Scam Exposed: Cholesterol Drugs Cause Rapid Aging, Brain Damage, and Diabetes

Statins, the widely prescribed class of drugs said to lower “bad” cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart problems, has recently come under fire after a study revealed that they destroy human health more than they work to improve it.
Sadly, many people take statin drugs, which are commonly known by brand names including Lipitor, Crestor and Zocor. Prescription drug spending in the U.S. shot up to about $374 billion in 2014, representing the highest level of spending since 2001. Statins undoubtedly made up a significant portion of this spending, and now consumers who take such drugs have much more to worry about than the dent it’s making in their wallets.
The study, which was published in the American Journal of Physiology, states that statins’ “…impact on other biologic properties of stem cells provides a novel explanation for their adverse clinical effects.” Specifically, the study states that such adverse effects include advancing the “process of aging” and also notes that “…long-term use of statins has been associated with adverse effects including myopathy, neurological side effects and an increased risk of diabetes.” Myopathy refers to skeletal muscle weakness.
Experts involved in the study suggest that the health problems associated with statins have likely been downplayed through the years. In reality, those taking such cholesterol-lowering drugs have been experiencing cataracts, fatigue, liver problems, muscle pain and memory loss. Simply put, the drugs have been found to tamper with cells in such a way that their primary purpose of reproduc Continue reading

Family: Mumia Abu-Jamal treated for diabetes complications

Family: Mumia Abu-Jamal treated for diabetes complications

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) --
Family members and supporters of Mumia Abu-Jamal say the former death row inmate was rushed to a Pennsylvania hospital to be treated for complications from diabetes.
Abu-Jamal's wife, brother and lawyers spoke Tuesday outside Schuylkill Medical Center in Pottsville, where he was taken Monday for treatment.
They say his blood sugar was dangerously high and he could have slipped into a diabetic coma.
Abu-Jamal is a former Black Panther serving life in prison for the 1981 murder of white Philadelphia Officer Daniel Faulkner. His conviction was upheld through years of appeals, but he has gained international support for his claim that he's the victim of a racist justice system.
His family is complaining that state prison officials failed to provide him with proper medical care. Continue reading

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