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Get Well Wednesday: Diabetes 101

Get Well Wednesday: Diabetes 101

Get Well Wednesday: Diabetes 101


ARE AFRICAN-AMERICANS AT A HIGHER RISK OF DEVELOPING DIABETES? IF SO, IS IT MORE HEREDITARY OR DIET AND LIFESTYLE?
Yes, African-Americans have twice the risk of developing diabetes as white Americans. This is more likely attributed to diet and lifestyle factors. There is a higher rate of obesity in the African-American community and there is a direct link between obesity and diabetes.
Diet and exercise plays a key role in preventing and managing the onset of diabetes. Adopting a healthy lifestyle with daily activity and diets with food lower in fat and calories and higher in fiber as well as fruits, vegetables and whole grains is very important.
HOW LIKELY IS IT THAT A CHILD WILL DEVELOP DIABETES IF PARENT HAS IT?
Though there is a genetic component to developing diabetes, if a parent has diabetes, it does not necessarily mean a child will have it as well.
WHATS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 DIABETES?
Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does produce insulin but it cannot effectively use it.
Type 1 is an autoimmune disease where the bodys immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin, so therefore the body cannot produce the insulin it needs to absorb the glucose (sugar) out of the blood and bring it into the cells where it needs energy. Type 1 usually occurs early on in childhood. The exact cause is not known but it is probably a combination of the genes a person is born with and something in the environment that triggers the genes to become active.
Type 2 disease Continue reading

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Regular alcohol drinkers have lower risk of diabetes, according to a huge new study

Regular alcohol drinkers have lower risk of diabetes, according to a huge new study

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There's a new checkmark in the 'drinking isn't all bad for you' column.
According to a new study that looked at more than 70,000 Danish people, those who drink small to moderate amounts of alcohol on a frequent basis are less likely to develop diabetes than people who don't drink at all.
To be clear, these results shouldn't be seen as license or encouragement to drink freely as a health-promoting exercise.
But they do provide further evidence that, for some reason, people who drink moderately are less likely to suffer from certain illnesses, including some cardiovascular diseases and type-2 diabetes.
Regular drinking and diabetes
For the new study, researchers wanted to see how much alcohol consumption was associated with the lowest diabetes risk, and determine whether the type of alcohol or the frequency that people drank mattered.
Using data from the Danish Health Examination Survey, they looked at the drinking habits of 28,704 men and 41,847 women, and tracked whether those people developed diabetes within approximately five years. The researchers excluded anyone who already had diabetes, was pregnant at the start of the study, and didn't provide information on their alcohol consumption.
The results showed that the study participants least likely to develop diabetes drank 3-4 days a week. For men, those who drank 14 drinks per week had the lowest risk, as the chart on the left shows below. For women, those who drank nine drinks per week had the lowest risk, as the right-hand chart shows.
As the U-shaped risk curve shows, study participants who didn't drink at all se Continue reading

Twitter-derived neighborhood characteristics associated with obesity and diabetes

Twitter-derived neighborhood characteristics associated with obesity and diabetes


Twitter-derived neighborhood characteristics associated with obesity and diabetes
Scientific Reportsvolume7, Articlenumber:16425 (2017)
Neighborhood characteristics are increasingly connected with health outcomes. Social processes affect health through the maintenance of social norms, stimulation of new interests, and dispersal of knowledge. We created zip code level indicators of happiness, food, and physical activity culture from geolocated Twitter data to examine the relationship between these neighborhood characteristics and obesity and diabetes diagnoses (Type 1 and Type 2). We collected 422,094 tweets sent from Utah between April 2015 and March 2016. We leveraged administrative and clinical records on 1.86 million individuals aged 20 years and older in Utah in 2015. Individuals living in zip codes with the greatest percentage of happy and physically-active tweets had lower obesity prevalenceaccounting for individual age, sex, nonwhite race, Hispanic ethnicity, education, and marital status, as well as zip code population characteristics. More happy tweets and lower caloric density of food tweets in a zip code were associated with lower individual prevalence of diabetes. Results were robust in sibling random effects models that account for family background characteristics shared between siblings. Findings suggest the possible influence of sociocultural factors on individual health. The study demonstrates the utility and cost-effectiveness of utilizing existing big data sources to conduct population health studies.
Where we live, including the social, political, e Continue reading

4 Easy Exercises That Can Help You Manage Diabetes

4 Easy Exercises That Can Help You Manage Diabetes


4 Easy Exercises That Can Help You Manage Diabetes
Its no secret that exercise has health benefitsfrom helping to control weight to improving mood and delivering oxygen and nutrients needed for that energy boost. People who have been diagnosed with diabetes are no exception. According to Sheri Colberg, PhD , exercise physiologist and diabetes educator, the activities that are really important for people with diabetes fall into four main categories: aerobic (or cardio) fitness, resistance training, flexibility, and balance training. Each of these plays a role in helping to keep you healthy and happy.
In addition to helping with weight loss, which is especially important for those with type-2 diabetes, the American Diabetes Association ranks aerobic exercise as one of the most important activities for those who have been diagnosed with diabetes to engage in. Why? Not only does it improve heart health and blood circulation, but a erobic exercise also helps your body use insulin better . In general, the CDC recommends you aim for 30 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic exercise at least five days a week, aiming for no more than two consecutive exercise-free days. The most common activity for people with type-2 diabetes is walking, says Colberg. So start by engaging in 30 minutes of brisk walking to help you hit that magical 10,000 steps a day .
Looking for something a bit more challenging? Pick up a jump rope and hop to it. The best part: In just 15 minutes , you can get a heart-healthy workout .
While aerobic training burns more calories, resistance training Continue reading

Ginger for Diabetes: Is It Really Safe and Good?

Ginger for Diabetes: Is It Really Safe and Good?


Ginger is a spice obtained from rhizomes (underground parts of the stem) of Zingiber officinale plant.
Due to its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, people in India and China have been using it as a natural remedy for many diseases, including nausea, morning sickness, motion sickness, Alzheimer's disease, flu, and cold for over 3,000 years ( 1 , 2 ).
Besides, it also reduces cholesterol, helps in weight loss and stimulates blood circulation ( 3 , 4 , 5 )
Allegedly, it may also slow down the growth of tumor (cancer) cells.
Ginger contains some bioactive plant substances, the most important of which is gingerol.
This molecule is responsible for most anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antidiabetic effects of ginger.
There are many ways to eat ginger. You may use it as a spice or food ingredient, make some ginger tea or buy some ginger powder, oil or juice in your local pharmacy or specialized stores.
Cosmetic manufacturers also add ginger to beauty products.
Many people think that the edible part of ginger is its root, but it is not true. The piece of the Zingiber officinale plant used in medicine is called rhizome, which is an underground section of the stem.
The summary: Ginger rhizomes contain gingerol, which is a potent phytochemical with strong antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic properties. You can consume ginger in various ways, including ginger tea, powder, juice or spice.
New research suggests that ginger may have strong antidiabetic effects. Ginger has a positive impact not only on diabetes itself, but it may also help in the trea Continue reading

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