diabetestalk.net

Frequent Urinating At Night May Be Sign Of Diabetes – Doctor

Frequent urinating at night may be sign of diabetes – Doctor

Frequent urinating at night may be sign of diabetes – Doctor

A resident doctor, Dr Segun Fadare, on Tuesday said urinating frequently at night could be a warning sign of high blood sugar level, the hallmark of Type 2 Diabetes
Fadare, who works with the Babcock University Teaching Hospital Annex, Ibadan said, “Needing to go to the bathroom once at night is considered normal, however, urinating more than once at night could indicate an underlying health condition like diabetes.
“Having diabetes leads to excess sugar builds up in your blood which causes the body to excrete the excess glucose through the urine.
“This triggers more frequent urination as the body tries to get rid of the excess amount of glucose and leave the body dehydrated and need to drink more fluid and urinate even more.”
According to him, while Type 2 diabetes may not be noticed easily, other signs to watch out for include excessive thirst, unexplainable tiredness and weight loss.
“Early diagnosis of diabetes is important to prevent complications including organ damage, heart disease, stroke and kidney failure.
“It is important to watch out for the warning signs, especially if you have increased the risk for diabetes in order to control your blood sugar level and prevent complications.”
Fadare advised that people should go for regular checkups for early diagnosis.
(NAN) Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
What to Know About the ADA's 2018 Standards of Medical Care if You Have Diabetes

What to Know About the ADA's 2018 Standards of Medical Care if You Have Diabetes

Living with poorly controlled blood sugar levels may lead to potentially serious health complications for people with diabetes — including diabetic neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy, amputations, depression, sexual issues, heart disease, stroke, and even death. But luckily, if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, managing your diet, lifestyle, and treatment well can help you stabilize blood sugar and ultimately reduce the risk of these potential future health issues.
To do this, it’s crucial to stay up to date on current treatment standards in the United States — and that starts with turning to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), which releases its Standards of Medical Care each year.
What Are the ADA Standards of Care and Why Should You Care?
In the ADA’s latest guidelines, released online in December 2017, the organization lists updates in areas related to heart disease and diabetes, new health technology, and more.
The standards reflect the latest evidence available to help improve care and health outcomes in people with diabetes, says William T. Cefalu, MD, the chief scientific, medical, and mission officer at the ADA who is based in New Orleans, Louisiana. “The new evidence that has been available this year from published work has been incredible,” Dr. Cefalu says.
Although the Standards of Medical Care are primarily geared toward the healthcare community, your diabetes management can benefit if you know about them, says Robert A. Gabbay, MD, PhD, the chief medical officer of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston.
Following is everything you need to know Continue reading

How to Improve Blood Sugar Levels and Reverse Diabetes For Good

How to Improve Blood Sugar Levels and Reverse Diabetes For Good

Every 23 seconds another person is diagnosed with diabetes — one the leading causes of death in the United States.
But these people don’t have to suffer. Diabetes is preventable, manageable, and reversible.
What is Diabetes? — A Quick Overview
There are two types of diabetes — type 1 and type 2.
This is an over-simplified chart, but it gives you a good visual of the differences and similarities between the two. Now, let’s dig a little deeper into each type of diabetes.
Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance happens when blood sugar levels are so consistently high that the cells don’t respond to insulin (a hormone that helps lower blood sugar) like they used to. When the cell aren’t as sensitive to insulin, blood sugar levels raise even more. As a result, insulin levels raise and the cells become more insulin resistant. This vicious cycle is commonly caused by eating too much sugar, not moving enough, and stressing too much.
Conversely, type 1 diabetes is when the body lacks the ability to produce insulin. In some cases, this is happens because the immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Despite the lack of insulin, type 1 diabetics can still manage their blood sugar levels by taking exogenous insulin.
Although type 1 and type 2 diabetes are caused in completely different ways, they both lead to higher blood sugar levels that will destroy cells throughout the body and cause chronic inflammation. If we can improve blood sugar levels then we can manage and reverse diabetes Continue reading

Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply and Travel Case

Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply and Travel Case

Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply and Travel Case
Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Travel Cases
When you have diabetes, you know how painful it is to travel with the entire insulin supply; there are numerous things at once, and also they are fragile.
So, in that situation, you need to have good quality insulin travel cases to support the whole package you are carrying. There are several different things like test strips, medications, glucose meter and other backup items.
Hence, Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply and Travel Case.
Insulin:
Insulin is a hormone that is created by the beta cells in the pancreatic islets. It is responsible for regulating the proper metabolism of different components like Carbohydrates, Proteins, and Fats by helping the glucose in getting absorbed in the fat, muscles and liver cells from the blood.
The glucose is further then converted into glycogen or fats, and when it is the liver tissues, it is converted into both the forms.
The excessive production of glucose is controlled by the insulin present in the blood. The insulin circulation also has effects on the manufacture of proteins. Thus if the insulin levels go down in your blood, it has harsh effects on your whole body.
Types of Insulin: There are various types of Insulin’s, but there are three main types of them:
Fast-acting insulin: This insulin is very quickly absorbed into the blood from the fat tissues. This is also helpful when one wants to control or correct sugar levels in the blood while having meals or snack or even when one wants to correct high levels of sugar in the blood.
Inter Continue reading

Diabetes in Elderly Adults

Diabetes in Elderly Adults

Abstract
Diabetes is common in the elderly population. By the age of 75, approximately 20% of the population are afflicted with this illness. Diabetes in elderly adults is metabolically distinct from diabetes in younger patient populations, and the approach to therapy needs to be different in this age group. Diabetes is associated with substantial morbidity from macro- and microvascular complications. Several lines of evidence suggest that optimal glycemic control and risk factor modification can substantially reduce the risk of complications in elderly patients. In the past, treatment options were limited. However, recent studies have delineated several new and exciting therapeutic opportunities for elderly patients with diabetes.
Decision Editor: John E. Morley, MB, BCh
Epidemiology
Numerous studies have evaluated the incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the elderly population. The most recent Health and Nutrition Survey, HANES III, suggests that approximately 20% of the population develop diabetes by the age of 75 (Fig. 1) (1). At least half of these patients are unaware they have the disease (2). The prevalence of diabetes is much higher in some ethnic groups, especially Native Americans, Hispanics, blacks, and Micronesians. Because elderly patients with diabetes are living longer and are likely to use increasing amounts of scarce health care resources in the next several decades, diabetes in aged adults may ultimately prove to be the most important epidemic of the 21st century.
There are several lines of evidence to suggest that type 2 diabetes in elderly adu Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles