diabetestalk.net

FREE Diabetes Testing And Healthy Heart Screenings

FREE Diabetes Testing and Healthy Heart Screenings

FREE Diabetes Testing and Healthy Heart Screenings

Please see the schedule below for upcoming Healthcare Clinics including:
Diabetes Testing
and
Healthy Heart Screenings
• Our Diabetes Testing measures your A1C levels. Your A1C is a measure of your average blood sugar over the previous 3 months. This test requires only a small amount of blood and no fasting.
• Our Healthy Heart screenings offer a risk assessment for heart disease, a lipid-stick profile test and a blood pressure check.
All screenings are available at the pharmacy for FREE.
For people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, heart disease and their families
For people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, heart disease and their families Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Why I Told My Diabetes Doctor to Back Off

Why I Told My Diabetes Doctor to Back Off

Let me just say it. I hate diabetes. I hate it. Oh, I know that it can be managed (I do) and that you can live a good, long life (I am — 27 years with Type 1 diabetes). But still, I hate it. And one of the reasons I hate it is that, for me, it has been so difficult to find a good doctor who’s not going to judge me and make me feel bad when my numbers are not in range. Not wanting to be judged, hassled, scolded or embarrassed for my diabetes self care, literally keeps me from going to the doctor as often as I should. Period. And I’m willing to bet that many of my fellow people with diabetes agree with me. So trust me when I say that rarely ever does chastisement motivate. Not for me anyway.
And to complicate my personal diabetes management even further, I work in the diabetes industry, and because I know many of the big players in the field, it impacts my career as well. Would they look at me differently if they knew that for the last week I’ve been struggling with my blood glucose levels and I’ve been averaging around 220? Would I be viewed as any less credible or talented or capable? Would they scoff and say, “She should know better”? Well, I’ve got news for you, diabetes is its own wild animal, and just like being in the wild, it is often unpredictable and random. Diabetes shifts day to day, even moment by moment. If I was confident that every time I took one unit of insulin, my blood sugars would come down in the same exact manner, this condition would be a whole different dynamic. But it’s rarely ever the same. So I struggle on, trying to catch the wav Continue reading

Blood glucose testing offers little value to some Type 2 diabetes patients: study

Blood glucose testing offers little value to some Type 2 diabetes patients: study

When Margaret DeNobrega was first diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, she meticulously monitored her eating habits and blood sugar levels.
The 68-year-old would write down what she ate for breakfast, lunch and dinner, pricking her finger to test her glucose levels before and after each meal.
"I used to test before my meals, so I would know what my blood sugar was at, and then I would test two hours after," she says. "I did that for quite a while.
"I guess maybe I did … obsess a little about it because I didn't want to go on medication."
It's a daily ritual for many with Type 2 diabetes, aimed at helping them keep their blood sugar levels in check. But according to a new U.S. study, that common finger-prick test may have little impact on managing the chronic condition.
Type 2 diabetes is one of the fastest-growing diseases in Canada, with about 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year.
Complications associated with the disease — including kidney disease, heart disease, blindness and stroke — can range from serious to life-threatening, making proper management of blood sugar levels important.
Insulin-dependent patients will frequently test their blood sugar before delivering a shot of the hormone.
But the majority of Type 2 patients aren't treated with insulin, and can instead regulate their glucose levels through diet, exercise and sometimes medication.
Rejecting routine testing
In a paper published this week in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers found that self-monitoring of blood sugar for non-insulin Type 2 patients offers virtually no benefit.
"From the study, what we fin Continue reading

Diabetes was once a problem of the rich. Now it belongs to the poor.

Diabetes was once a problem of the rich. Now it belongs to the poor.

As the global diabetes rate soared over the past quarter-century, the affected population transformed: What was once predominantly a rich-country problem has become one that disproportionately affects poorer countries.
That's one of the many conclusions of the World Health Organization's first global report on the chronic disease. Worldwide, diabetes rates nearly doubled, from 4.7 percent in 1980 to 8.5 percent in 2014. Roughly one in 12 people living in the world today have the disease, which has spread dramatically.
“If we are to make any headway in halting the rise in diabetes, we need to rethink our daily lives: To eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain,” Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General, said in a statement. “Even in the poorest settings, governments must ensure that people are able to make these healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose and treat people with diabetes.”
Most of the 422 million adults living with diabetes are, in fact, in poorer countries, the WHO found.
The disease has spread unequally, too.
Over the past decade, diabetes prevalence rose faster in low- and middle-income countries than high-income ones.
As the chart below shows, diabetes prevalence in high-income countries rose from just over 5 percent to about 7 percent.
Low-income countries saw rates grow from just over 3 percent to more than 7 percent, overtaking high-income countries for the first time within the past decade.
That switch is likely linked to other factors, such as rising global obesity, says Etienne Krug, director of the Continue reading

Depression and Diabetes

Depression and Diabetes

By the dLife Editors
Depression can strike anyone, but people who have diabetes appear to be at greater risk. In fact, studies suggest that people who have type 2 diabetes have a much as double the risk of depression as people who don’t. The rate of depression is thought to be at least three times higher in people with type 1 diabetes than in people without diabetes.
In a vicious cycle, people with depression may be at greater risk for developing diabetes. Thus, the strong diabetes depression link.
As diabetes complications get worse, it is common for depression to increase as well, which can lead to a lack of proper self-care.
You have to live with diabetes, but you do not have to live with debilitating depression. Treatment for depression helps people manage symptoms of both diseases, thus improving the quality of their lives.
What Is Depression?
Depression isn’t just feeling “down” or being sad in response to a loss or challenge life throws at you. It’s a mood disorder that causes ongoing, persistent symptoms that disrupt your life, affecting how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating, or working.
While depression is serious, it’s also treatable. And since depression can affect nearly every aspect of a person’s well-being, it’s important to get help.
Symptoms of Depression
People experience depression differently. The severity, frequency, and duration of symptoms vary depending on the person and his or her particular illness.
Symptoms of depression most commonly include:
Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
Feelings Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles