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For The Love Of Exogenous Ketones!

For the love of exogenous ketones!

For the love of exogenous ketones!

You read that correctly. I love ketones and I am actively pursuing ways to increase my bodies ability to produce them through the use of exogenous ketone supplements. Ketones are a dirty word in the world of diabetes because of the confusion surrounding their appearance as the harbinger of doom through DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis). Unfortunately many healthcare providers actively discourage their diabetic patients from attempting to achieve nutritional ketosis because they don’t fully understand the difference between nutritional ketosis and DKA. That difference is NOT the focus of this post, other than to establish the fact that there IS a difference.
It’s important to note that the means of detecting DKA is typically the presence of ketones in the blood. Adding them through exogenous supplementation or nutritional ketosis is useful (I would even argue beneficial), but not without some risk. In case of insulin deficiency (bad pump site, occlusion, skipped dose etc) while in ketosis one would be without the means to clearly identify DKA. You’d only be able to guess based on blood glucose level to infer how insulin deficient you are. The risk can be mitigated through vigilance and attention to insulin dosing but shouldn’t be taken lightly.
I’ve recently started using exogenous ketones to help put me into nutritional ketosis more readily and I wanted to report the initial findings since I’ve been asked about them so many times. Up till this point I didn’t feel compelled to spend the time and money on exogenous ketone supplements–which are not cheap! I took the Continue reading

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Does Cannabis Help With Diabetes Treatment?

Does Cannabis Help With Diabetes Treatment?

Does cannabis help with diabetes treatment? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have two completely different causes. Yet, the same herb may be helpful for both of the conditions. Though research is in its early stages, there have even been some small human trials of cannabinoid therapies as a diabetes treatment. While evidence that that the herb may improve insulin sensitivity and help autoimmunity is still under review, cannabis may help patients cope with difficult diabetes symptoms.
Type 1 diabetes
Cannabis has a lot of potential in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, type 1 diabetes included. In type 1 diabetes, an overactive immune system decides to attack the pancreas. The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, a hormone which moves sugar out of the blood and into cells.
When the immune system attacks these cells, they can no longer produce the insulin needed to regulate blood sugar. Unfortunately, type 1 diabetics are usually on life-long insulin. When the pancreas becomes too damaged, there is not much you can do other than replace the hormone that the organ makes.
While cannabis therapy cannot create more insulin, the herb may be helpful for another reason. Active compounds in the plant called cannabinoids may help calm the immune system in type 1 diabetes. Calming the immune system stops your body from attacking itself, decreasing harm to the pancreas. Here’s how the herb seems to work:
Cannabis and autoimmune diabetes
Back in 2001, researchers put psychoactive THC to the test in mice with autoimmune diabetes. The mice were treated with 150mg/kg of THC. The sc Continue reading

Eating with Diabetes: Counting ''Net'' Carbs

Eating with Diabetes: Counting ''Net'' Carbs

Since low carbohydrate diets became popular, the phrase "net carbs" has become a fairly regular fixture on the labels of food products. But, if you are not familiar with the term you may be wondering what in the world it means!
There are three types of carbohydrates: starches, sugars and fiber. All three types of carbs are added up and listed as Total Carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts Label of a food product.
The concept of net carbs is based on the fact that, although it is considered a carbohydrate, dietary fiber is not digested the same way the other two types of carbohydrates (starches and sugars) are. While starches and sugars are broken down into glucose (blood sugar), fiber isn't treated the same way. The fiber you eat passes through the body undigested and helps add bulk to your stool (among other benefits). The indigestibility of fiber is where the idea of "net carbs" comes in. In fact, sometimes, net carbs are sometimes referred to as "digestible carbs.''
In recent years, food manufacturers have started including net carbs in addition to total carbs when labeling products. Many foods proudly display net carbs on their labels to entice both low-carb diet fans and people with diabetes.
While the concept of net carbs can be utilized in diabetes meal planning, read labels with a discerning eye. At present there are no mandated rules for calculating or labeling net carbs on food packages. The FDA does not regulate or oversee the use of these terms, and exactly what is listed as "net carbs" can vary dramatically from product to product. Some products calculate net ca Continue reading

The 10 best diabetes blogs

The 10 best diabetes blogs

Living with diabetes can be a challenging burden. But it can be helpful to share your frustrations and successes, and read about people's similar experiences. We have identified the best diabetes blogs that aim to inspire, empower, and educate readers.
Diabetes is a group of diseases that impact how the body uses blood glucose, and it affects around 29.1 million people in the United States.
Having type 1 diabetes means that the body does not produce enough insulin, and the condition is more commonly diagnosed in childhood or adolescence.
But having type 2 diabetes means that the body cannot use insulin properly, and this type is more common in individuals over the age of 40 years. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95 percent of all diagnosed diabetes cases.
Keeping on top of your diabetes treatment plan can be a round-the-clock commitment that may feature blood sugar monitoring, medications and insulin, healthy eating, and regular physical activity.
Medical News Today have rounded up the top 10 diabetes blogs, based on the quality of their information, helpful tips, recipes, fitness advice, and personal accounts.
Speaking of Diabetes
Speaking of Diabetes is the blog of the Joslin Diabetes Center. The Joslin Diabetes Center is a research and teaching affiliate of the Harvard Medical School. Their team of more than 300 scientists is dedicated to finding innovative pathways to prevent, treat, and cure type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
While in pursuit of a world without diabetes, Joslin is helping to improve the lives of individuals with diabetes through patient education programs and ca Continue reading

3 Ways Having Type 1 Diabetes Makes Me a Better Parent

3 Ways Having Type 1 Diabetes Makes Me a Better Parent

There was absolutely a time in my life when I firmly believed I shouldn’t get pregnant and give birth to my own children because of reasons like, “This body isn’t a good environment for a baby to grow inside of” or “My body is under enough stress, why would I put it through pregnancy?”
And what about after the baby was born? Surely that baby would interfere with my own self-care of the chronic illnesses I’ve been diagnosed with.
And for some, those may be very valid reasons not to become pregnant, but for me, I’m actually pretty darn healthy despite having type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and fibromyalgia. On paper, when you don’t look at those diagnoses, I’m a healthy gal at a healthy weight, healthy blood pressure, yada yada yada. No doctor had ever told me I couldn’t pursue pregnancy. If anything, the opposite was encouraged.
About two years after falling in love with my husband, it suddenly dawned on me: I can absolutely handle pregnancy and giving birth to my own children. I can do this. And I want this.
I was suddenly done letting fear stand in the way of something I genuinely wanted: creating a family with my husband.
Here are three reasons I am so grateful I didn’t let fear prevent me from pursuing pregnancy and motherhood:
1. It gave me a new appreciation for what my body can do.
My body can’t produce insulin. My body can’t digest gluten properly. My body severely overreacts with symptoms of intense pain and extreme exhaustion for reasons medical researchers still don’t understand when I use my muscles and joints for anything beyond the Continue reading

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