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Foods To Avoid For People With Diabetes

Foods to avoid for people with diabetes

Foods to avoid for people with diabetes

Taking control of what foods they eat not only helps people manage their diabetes but also influences how well they feel and how much energy they have every day.
We take a look at what foods people with diabetes should avoid and outline what they should eat instead.
Foods to avoid with diabetes
Having diabetes does not have to stop people from eating the foods they enjoy. However, it does mean that they should eat smaller portions, less often.
The Institute of Medicine recommend that carbohydrate intake for most people should be between 45-65 percent of total calories. This higher carbohydrate intake is consistent with plant-based diets, which have shown benefit for diabetes management in well-designed, long-term studies.
However, some research has shown that people can improve their blood sugar levels when their carbohydrate intake is between 5-35 percent of calories. Much of the research comes from short-term studies for higher-fat diets, such as the ketogenic diet and Mediterranean diets.
Experts are just beginning to understand the influence that the gut bacteria have on health. What is known is that high-fiber carbohydrates feed gut bacteria while a high-fat, low-carb diet often results in gut bacteria death. This is far from ideal as people with diabetes already have lower levels of gut bacteria.
Populations around the world that live the longest, known as Blue Zones, all eat a plant-based diet, rich in whole foods and carbohydrates.
The key to eating well with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthful foods from each of the food groups.
Foods to avoid within the majo Continue reading

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Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

What is the relationship between cholesterol and diabetes? How does cholesterol affect my diabetes, and how do I manage it?
Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil
When Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she had questions about her cholesterol. Though her overall number was at 180 mg/dl, and in a normal range, her LDL-C was higher than normal, although mildly elevated, and her HDL-C was low.
Her doctor had explained very little about this to Judy, and she was confused. How can her overall cholesterol number be acceptable, but her other cholesterol numbers were out of range.
What did this mean for Judy’s health? Was she more prone to heart disease and stroke due to these cholesterol numbers? Her triglycerides were a little elevated, too.
We decided to give Judy a guide that would help her to fully understand her cholesterol numbers, and how they affect her cardiovascular health. We also wanted to make sure that Judy and others like her understand how their cholesterol numbers relate to their diabetes. So let’s get started…
What is cholesterol
Cholesterol is mainly comprised of fat and lipoproteins. A lipoprotein is comprised of cholesterol, protein, and fat (triglycerides). Cholesterol comes from two sources. Our body manufactures some cholesterol on its own. In addition, cholesterol comes from animal products, such as milk, eggs, cheese, and meats. Cholesterol has the consistency similar to gum or wax. Small amounts of cholesterol are important for a healthy cell membrane (good cholesterol), and some cholesterol has been deemed, “the bad cholesterol,” due to these chole Continue reading

Diabetes Insipidus: Causes & Symptoms + 5 Natural Treatments

Diabetes Insipidus: Causes & Symptoms + 5 Natural Treatments

Diabetes insipidus, is a debilitating and rare disease, with a prevalence of 1 out of 25,000 people. Often referred to as “water diabetes,” it is a condition characterized by frequent and heavy urination, excessive thirst and an overall feeling of weakness. It’s caused by a defect in the pituitary gland or in the kidneys. (1)
The term insipidus means “without taste” in Latin, while diabetes mellitus involves the excretion of “sweet” urine. People with diabetes insipidus pass urine that is diluted, odorless and relatively low in sodium content.
Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus (which includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes) are unrelated. Both conditions do cause frequent urination and constant thirst. People with diabetes insipidus have normal blood sugar levels, but their kidneys cannot balance fluid in the body.
Although the symptoms of diabetes insipidus can be bothersome and sometimes even life-changing, the condition doesn’t increase future health risks when it is managed properly. It’s important to find the right treatment plan, which typically involves taking measures to avoid dehydration.
What is Diabetes Insipidus?
Diabetes insipidus is a condition that disrupts normal life due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes or urine, even at night. It is a part of a group of hereditary or acquired polyuria (when large amounts of urine is produced) and polydipsia (excessive thirst) diseases. It’s associated with inadequate vasopressin or antidiuretic hormone secretion.
Vasopressin, which includes arginine vasopressin (AVP) and antidiur Continue reading

Diabetes Awareness Luncheon Offers Valuable Education for All

Diabetes Awareness Luncheon Offers Valuable Education for All

Members of Hospital’s Clinical Team Will Focus on Prevention, Management of Disease
Carthage Area Hospital invites the public to attend an educational luncheon on Wednesday, Nov. 15, that will empower guests with information on the risks for diabetes, tips to prevent the disease and how those living with it can thrive.
The free luncheon is set for 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Carthage Elks Lodge, 511 Fulton St. A complimentary lunch will be served. Email [email protected] or call 315-519-5209 to reserve your seat today or register online at www.carthageareahospital.com/diabetes.
November is National Diabetes Month so individuals, health care professionals, organizations, and communities across the country can bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 1.7 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes each year. Through proper education and training people with diabetes can thrive.
“Knowing the risks for diabetes and making healthier choices can make a huge difference in preventing diabetes and living well with the disease,” said Carthage Area Hospital Nutrition Services Director Carly R. Draper, RD, CDN, CDE. Draper, a Certified Diabetes Educator, is one of three members of the hospital’s clinical team scheduled to speak during the event. She will present an overview of the disease and outline steps to manage nutrition with diabetes.
Clinical Pharmacist Christopher Bradley, PharmD, MBA, will discuss effective medication choices for Type 1 & Type 2 diabetes and Therapy Specialist William Blund Continue reading

A Craftsman Blames His Tools: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy & Long-Term Diabetes Control

A Craftsman Blames His Tools: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy & Long-Term Diabetes Control

A Craftsman Blames His Tools: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy & Long-Term Diabetes Control
Summary
After consistently receiving higher-than-expected A1c results, I tested my meter against four of the most popular meters available to see if systematic bias was at the heart of my frustration. The results were particularly damning to not only my meter, but to the landscape as a whole. I found that meter accuracy alone could be responsible for a full 1.5% difference in A1c without any change to perceived glucose control, resulting in significantly different treatment plans and emotional outcomes. This contrasts the rhetoric presented by device manufacturers, medical providers, and leading diabetes organizations, all of whom take a particularly casual approach to the question of accuracy.
Introduction
When I started using Dexcom’s G4 Platinum w/ Share continuous glucose monitor (CGM) about a year ago, I found that my average glucose was not correlating well with my periodic A1c results. Specifically, for three separate three-month periods, my A1c came in a full percentage point higher than my average glucose (as calculated from my CGM data) would predict. This was especially frustrating given how much effort I was spending tuning my homemade artificial pancreas. While there are numerous potential sources for this discrepancy, the fact that it was occurring consistently pointed me in the direction of something that could cause systematic bias: the twice-daily blood glucose meter readings used to calibrate my CGM.
For the past seven years or so, I have been using the Johnson & John Continue reading

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