diabetestalk.net

Five Rupee Herbal Pill To Treat Diabetes

Five rupee herbal pill to treat diabetes

Five rupee herbal pill to treat diabetes

Hyderabad: An anti-diabetes herbal drug that costs Rs.5 per pill, developed by two Lucknow-based Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) laboratories, has been launched in parts of north India.
The drug, branded BGR-34, is a combination of natural extracts derived from four plant species mentioned in ancient Ayurveda texts. The drug available in the form of a 500 milligram (mg) pill is a twice-a-day treatment for patients suffering from type-2 diabetes.
The drug was jointly developed by two CSIR laboratories, the National Botanical Research Institute (NBRI) and Central Institute for Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CIMAP), and was licensed to Delhi-based Aimil Pharamaceuticals Pvt. Ltd for commercialization.
Aimil will pay royalty on the drug’s sales to CSIR.
BGR-34 was approved by AYUSH—the ministry that deals with traditional Indian medicine—after testing on 1,000 patients over a period of 18 months across five states—Delhi, Himachal Pradesh, Haryana, Punjab and Karnataka—with 67% patients showing normal blood sugar levels within 3-4 days of drug usage.
The drug, to be taken as an add-on or adjuvant to existing diabetes treatment, helps in maintaining normal blood glucose levels, in addition to improving the immune system, releasing antioxidants and checking free radicals.
“The modern diabetic drugs are known for side-effects and toxicity while BGR-34 works by controlling blood sugar and limiting the harmful effects of other drugs,” said A.K.S. Rawat, senior principal scientist at NBRI, in a telephone interview from Lucknow.
To be sure, BGR-34 isn Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Are Beets Good for Diabetes?

Are Beets Good for Diabetes?

Use of the word "superfood" has grown in recent years. Many a vegetable has been given this title, often despite little evidence for the health benefits claimed for such foods.
Could the humble beet qualify as a superfood? If the potential health benefits identified in a number of studies are confirmed in further research, the answer could be yes.
Contents of this article:
What are beets?
Beets, also called beetroot, table beet, garden beet, and red beet, are one of several varieties of Beta vulgaris. Beets are grown for their edible root and leaves. Other cultivated varieties include the sugar beet, which has white flesh, and a leafy vegetable called chard.
Beets are most often deep red in color. It is possible to obtain golden, white, and stripy red and white versions of the vegetable, however.
They have been cultivated since the beginning of recorded history and were often used for medicinal purposes as well as for food. Medicinal uses included treating fevers, constipation, and skin complaints. The vegetable was also commonly used by the Romans as an aphrodisiac.
Are beets good for people with diabetes?
Lowering blood pressure
Research has suggested that eating beets, or drinking beet juice, may benefit people with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a common condition among people with diabetes, and particularly those with type 2 diabetes.
The blood pressure-lowering effect is thought to be caused by the presence of nitrates in beet juice. These nitrates improve the ability of blood vessels to widen, improving blood flow.
In a recent study published in the jour Continue reading

Girl With Diabetes and Insulin Allergy to Receive Pancreas Transplant

Girl With Diabetes and Insulin Allergy to Receive Pancreas Transplant

A 12-year old South Carolina girl with Type 1 diabetes and what her parents describe as an intense allergy to insulin therapy is set to undergo a rarely performed whole pancreas transplant at the University of Minnesota.
Jack and Tiffanie Reeves, parents of Emmy, say they will take her on a cross country trip to diabetes camp in California, including a stop at Universal Studios in Orlando to “build memories,” and then move her temporarily to Minnesota with her mother as they wait for a pancreas to become available.
The surgeon who will perform the transplant, Dr. Raja Kandaswamy, Director of the Pancreas and Intestinal Transplant Program at the University of Minnesota , says Emmy’s transplant will be the first one done at his center in the past 15 to perhaps 20 years. And while Kandaswamy points to Emmy’s situation as unique, he also says he feels that pancreas transplantation is an option too few pediatric endocrinologists consider for patients. “There is not as much enthusiasm as there should be,” Kandaswamy said. “The diabetes community is told [with a transplant] they are just trading off one set of risks for another.”
In some cases, he disagrees. “I think it can be a viable choice,” he said.
Kandaswamy said that in recent years, steroid use in transplant patients has been cut down to near zero, meaning less harsh medications after a transplant. “We are looking at a new era of transplant,” he said. “The nature of it has changed.” He added that when islet cell transplantation is approved for minors, he foresees transplantation becoming more po Continue reading

Lupin plans to bring new class of diabetes drug to India

Lupin plans to bring new class of diabetes drug to India

Mumbai: Lupin Ltd, India’s second largest pharmaceutical company, is looking to enhance its diabetes drugs offering in the domestic market by bringing in a new class of drugs through the in-licensing route, a senior company official said.
Under in-licensing, a company gets a licence to market a product of another company in one or more geographies.
Lupin’s current diabetes products’ basket includes different classes of drugs such as oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs), insulins and novel drugs like sodium glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor drug empagliflozin, and Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor drug linagliptin.
“When it comes to diabetes, we have a complete range of products. One thing, we are missing is GLP 1 analog, which we are looking to bring into our portfolio,” Rajeev Sibal, president, India Region Formulations, Lupin, told Mint.
GLP 1 or glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist helps normalise blood sugar levels.
In India, GLP 1 class of drugs is sold by Novo Nordisk, Eli Lily and Co. and Sanofi, in injectable form.
According to data from healthcare information provider QuintilesIMS, Novo Nordisk sells its drug through partner Abbott India under brand name Victoza, Eli Lily under the brand Trulicity, and Sanofi under the brand Lyxumia. The prices of these injections are in the range of Rs3,100 to Rs4,000.
In the area of diabetes, Lupin has had in-licensing deals with US-based Eli Lilly and German company Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH over the last two-three years to bring in new classes of drugs to the Indian market.
The overall market size of di Continue reading

How to Count Carbs for Diabetes Management

How to Count Carbs for Diabetes Management

Most of my clients with diabetes count carbs to help manage their blood sugar levels. It’s one of many tools to help them with meal planning.
What is carb counting?
With carb counting, you estimate the amount of carbohydrate in your food with the goal of staying within a predetermined range or allowance for each meal and snack.
Carb counting does NOT mean avoiding carbohydrates. It does NOT mean that carbs are bad. Carbohydrates are a nutrient. They are not a type of food. And many, many health-boosting, disease-fighting foods are rich in carbohydrates. Think fruit, quinoa, yogurt, milk, vegetables, black beans, chickpeas, limas, brown rice and a million more!
The beauty of carb counting is that it gives you tons of flexibility. You can choose your carbohydrates from any type of food. This is also the downfall of carb counting. I sure don’t want you to focus on carb counts without paying attention to nutrition. This is just like limiting calories to lose weight, but favoring veggie chips and diet pudding over the foods your body really needs like fruit, nuts and salmon.
Why is it a good idea to count carbs?
Don’t avoid carbs. Count them!
Eating a lot of carbohydrate at one time raises blood sugar a lot, and eating just a little carbohydrate, raises blood sugar less. Many people with diabetes aim for about 45 – 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal and 15 grams or so per snack, but the amount that’s right for you may be more or less. And that depends on your medications, activity level, blood sugar goals and other things. I like to look at my patients’ food records a Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • Researchers Make Progress on a Pill to Stop Type 2 Diabetes

    Pharmaceutical researchers are one step closer to making a pill that can reverse the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. They published their research in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. Diabetes and its complications are a major issue within the United States and abroad. In 2012, the American Diabetes Association reported that 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the population, lived with diab ...

  • Pill for diabetes that costs just £1.30 a day also cuts the risk of heart and kidney disease by 14%

    A cheap anti-diabetes drug slashes the risk of heart attacks and kidney disease, a major study has found. Experts last night said the study, carried out among 10,000 patients in 30 countries, heralds a ‘new era’ in the treatment of type two diabetes. Canagliflozin, a pill taken once a day before breakfast, is designed to lower blood sugar levels and keep weight down. But the new study, present ...

  • A Type 1 Diabetes Pill? Newest Sotagliflozin Trial Results

    Research reveals improved A1c and weight loss benefits for people with type 1 diabetes on sotagliflozin, but a slightly increased risk of DKA The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) 77th Scientific Session in June convened key leaders in diabetes research to share findings on the latest drug developments. At the conference, Lexicon Pharmaceuticals presented full results from three major trials ...

  • Prescription Broccoli in a Pill Seen as the Potential Future of Diabetes Treatment

    Prescription Broccoli in a Pill Seen as the Potential Future of Diabetes Treatment The life-changing disease Type 2 Diabetes is on the rise worldwide, and especially alarming is the fact that rates are on the rise among children and teenagers, potentially condemning them to a lifetime of dependence on pills, shots, blood-sugar testing, and doctors visits. There are many natural alternatives to ...

  • Symptoms of EARLY diabetes: Five risk factors putting YOU on course for type 2 diabetes

    Prediabetes is also referred to by medics as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which is treatable but not easily reversed. Experts said it is a ‘critical stage’ in the development of diabetes because lifestyle choices - such as changing diet and exercising - can return blood sugar levels to normal. It is th ...

  • Got pre-diabetes? Here’s five things to eat or avoid to prevent type 2 diabetes

    Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies arou ...

  • Got pre-diabetes? Here's five things to eat or avoid to prevent type 2 diabetes

    Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies arou ...

  • Suffering from diabetes? These five apps can help you manage your lifestyle better

    Diabetes requires long-term treatment, often spanning over many years. This makes adherence to a blood sugar-controlling lifestyle, such as healthy eating, regular physical activity, and timely medication, a challenge. It is common for patients to make errors in their diabetes management, by either binge eating carbohydrates on a particular day, not exercising enough, or forgetting to take their m ...

  • Sixty-five people a day in UK die early from diabetes complications – study

    Sixty five people a day in the UK are dying early from complications arising from diabetes, which is the “fastest-growing epidemic of our time”, according to a charity. The number of adults with diabetes in the UK has risen by more than 1.5 million in the past decade to more than 4.5 million, including an estimated 1 million who have type 2 diabetes but do not know it. Diabetes UK analysis of ...

Related Articles