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Fighting Sickle Cell Disease Using A Type 2 Diabetes Medication

Fighting sickle cell disease using a type 2 diabetes medication

Fighting sickle cell disease using a type 2 diabetes medication


Dr. Vivien Sheehan, assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor and Texas Childrens Cancer and Hematology Centers
Sickle cell disease and the blood disorder beta thalassemia affect more than 180,000 Americans and millions more worldwide. Both diseases can be made milder or even cured by increasing fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels, but current treatment to ramp up HbF is limited in its effectiveness. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Childrens Cancer and Hematology Centers have discovered a gene, FOXO3, involved in controlling fetal hemoglobin production and were able to target the gene and turn on fetal hemoglobin levels in patient samples in the lab using the diabetes drug metformin. This offers promising new treatments the first new drug treatment for sickle cell disease in 30 years and the first ever for beta thalassemia.
It was a major breakthrough to show that a common drug already in use for type 2 diabetes could be a treatment for sickle cell disease by inducing fetal hemoglobin, a type of hemoglobin that doesnt become sickle shaped but is usually turned off in infancy, said Dr. Vivien Sheehan , assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor and Texas Childrens Cancer and Hematology Centers and lead investigator of the research. This is an exciting example of collaborative, bench-to-bedside research that has now resulted in a clinical trial that is already enrolling patients.
Sheehan launched this research as a clinical fellow at Baylor College of Medicine in 2011 with the goal of identifying new drug targets to help sickle cell patients make more f Continue reading

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Running well with Type 2 Diabetes  a personal story

Running well with Type 2 Diabetes a personal story


Diabetes Ireland > Running well with Type 2 Diabetes a personal story
Running well with Type 2 Diabetes a personal story
Brda Cormack is running the Dublin marathon for Diabetes, having been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes at 35 years old. She is based in Canada. She recounts her personal story of Type 2 Diabetes below.
I never thought that I would become diabetic. Im young, physicallyfit and healthy. I was soupsetwhen I found out. Whats worse is that Im type two and completely different from the stereotype of a Type 2.
There is no educational support or support groups here in Canada that are applicable to my situation. All of the information on Type 2 discusses diet and exercise however I already exercise 2 4 hrs a day so my diagnosis really didnt make any sense and was incredibly disheartening
Photo:Brda at 32km in Edmonton Marathon 2015
But, Im a pretty determined person so I decided to turn a negative into a positive.To change my frame of mind,I began considering what else have I might haveput limits onor hadnt considered possible before the diagnosis. My first thought was running. My aunt in Kildare is a formermarathon runner. (22 under her belt I believe) I remember her taking me out for a 6 milerun at 16 years old with her running group and it was brutal! I admired her but never in a million years considered running one myself. So, I decided running a marathon would be a positive place to focus my energy and I signed up for my first marathon that same year.
Im not fast. Running long distances and maintaining blood sugar levelsis incredibly difficult. An Continue reading

Diabetes Mellitus Expanded Evaluation [Hot Topic]

Diabetes Mellitus Expanded Evaluation [Hot Topic]


Diabetes Mellitus Expanded Evaluation [Hot Topic]
Andrew McKeon M.D. is Co-Director of the Neuroimmunology Laboratory, Professor of Neurology, and an Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota
Hi, Im Matt Binnicker, the Director of Clinical Virology and Vice Chair of Practice in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic. Did you know that more than 29 million Americans live with diabetes, and it remains one of the leading causes of death in the United States? Well, because of the significance of this disease, its important that we identify patients as early as possible, and in this months Hot Topic, my colleague, Dr. Andrew McKeon, will provide you with valuable information regarding the utility of antibody testing for the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. I hope you enjoy this months Hot Topic, and I want to personally thank you for allowing Mayo Medical Laboratories the opportunity to be a partner in your patients healthcare.
In this Hot Topic presentation, I am going to discuss the diabetes mellitus evaluation in serum, which has been updated to include the Zinc Transporter 8 Antibody (ZnT8 Ab).
My name is Dr. Andrew McKeon. I am a Co-Director of the Neuroimmunology Lab and Professor of Neurology, Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Although we are primarily a neuroimmunology lab, we also have a long-standing commitment to serological diagnoses in type 1 diabetes.
The objective of this presentation is to describe the utility of ant Continue reading

5 Steps for Managing Diabetes on Campus

5 Steps for Managing Diabetes on Campus


Tips for making college a safe and healthy home away from home
Well before you get to college, find a diabetes care team near campus. Your current pediatrician or endocrinologist may know of nearby doctors, nurses, and diabetes educators. Or reach out to your local American Diabetes Association office for referrals, says Paul Madden, MEd, the Associations director of type1 and type2 diabetes programs.
Plan to get to know the folks at your campus health centerand make sure they get to know you, Madden says. Students, not their parents, should call ahead of their move to introduce themselves as someone with diabetes. Then, within a couple days of school starting, visit the health center and share information about your diabetes, such as medication and insulin dosages, and perhaps bring backup insulin vials or pens to store there. This serves two purposes, Madden says: If you run low on insulin in your dorm room, it may be easier to walk to the health center than get to a pharmacy. It also makes you a familiar face with your care team on campus.
The people you live withroommates, resident advisers, and resident directorsshould know you have diabetes, says Christina Roth, CEO and founder of the College Diabetes Network, an online and in-person network of college students and alumni with diabetes.
Its wise to teach your roommates to administer glucagon in an emergency. Alternatively, Madden suggests telling them, If I cant safely drink something sweetnot alcohol!please call the health center or 911. Help them understand (and remember) by printing and distributing diabetes Continue reading

New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes

New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes


New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes
New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes
The ViaCyte trial is being run at three sites in North America, including University of Minnesota Health.
Greg Romero (right) has to live with his type 1 diabetes all day, every day. But a new clinical trial offered through University of Minnesota Health could give him a functional cure for his disease.
Greg Romero cant run or hide from his type 1 diabetes .
Its the main priority I have, taking care of this disease, he said. Every minute of every day.
Romero has been diabetic since he was 11 years old, but in the past several years his disease has become more complicated. Hes developed hypoglycemia unawareness, which means hes not able to feel when his blood glucose drops to dangerously low levels. Even with new technology that routinely provides him insulin and monitors his blood glucose levels, managing his disease is an ever-present responsibility.
Now, theres a sign of hope. Romero is one of a handful of people in the world participating in a new clinical trial thats studying whether pancreatic progenitor cells, transplanted into a person with type 1 diabetes, can become cells that produce insulin naturallyeffectively curing the disease. Developed by ViaCyte, the trial is available at three sites in North America, including University of Minnesota Health.
Learn more about University of Minnesota Health diabetes care.
These pancreatic progenitor cells are a renewable resource. A single progenitor cell Continue reading

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