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Fibromyalgia And Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Fibromyalgia and Diabetes: Is There a Link?

Fibromyalgia and Diabetes: Is There a Link?

You ache all over. You’re not sleeping well. You seem to be forgetting things, and your overall mood matches the Grinch who stole Christmas. And you’ve been feeling this way for months. Is it the stress at work? Blood sugar ups and downs? Or something more chronic? While there are many reasons for your symptoms, don’t rule out a condition called fibromyalgia.
What is fibromyalgia?
Fibromyalgia is a chronic disorder that is associated with pain in the muscles and bones, areas of tenderness, and fatigue. It’s a condition that affects anywhere from 5 to 10 million Americans, but it’s also tough to diagnose because the symptoms are subjective — meaning, there are no tests that can accurately diagnose this disorder.
What are the symptoms of fibromyalgia?
As mentioned above, symptoms include:
• Areas of pain or tenderness at certain places on the body (often called trigger points or tender points
• Fatigue
• Difficulty sleeping or sleeping for long stretches at a time without feeling rested
• Memory issues (“fibro fog”)
• Depression
• Headaches
• Sensitivity to light or sound
• Anxiety
• Trouble focusing or paying attention
• Pain in the abdomen
Fibromyalgia can go hand-in-hand with other chronic conditions, too, including:
• Irritable bowel syndrome
• Interstitial cystitis
• Endometriosis
• TMJ (temporomandibular joint problems)
• Rheumatoid arthritis
• Lupus
What causes fibromyalgia?
Experts aren’t exactly sure what causes fibromyalgia. In fact, until more recently, fibromyalgia was often brushed off by the medical community bec Continue reading

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8 Best Smoothies For People With Diabetes

8 Best Smoothies For People With Diabetes

Are smoothies good for diabetes? That depends. If it’s the 32 ounce variety from a smoothie chain with a drive-through, probably not.
If you make it at home in your blender, is it then good for diabetes? That depends also. The ingredients that you put in it, specifically the amount of sugar and balance of protein and “good” fats, and the portion size matter.
For diabetes, you should be counting your carbohydrates.
You should know what a good size smoothie is for you. If you wonder what kinds of things you should put in it to make it healthier and delicious, you have come to the right place. We will help you to make nutritional sense of it all.
I enjoy collecting healthy recipes for my patients with diabetes, and for my family. I have compiled a list of the best and healthiest smoothie recipes that I can find on the internet. It is almost fall, and time for Halloween!
Autumn is one of my favorite seasons, and the first two smoothies on my list are made to gather the spices of fall into one.
If your friends are heading out for a Pumpkin Pie Latte, why not make your own healthier smoothie and invite them to try it? First, let’s see what Brenda’s been drinking.
What kind of smoothie did Brenda have?
Brenda came into clinic. She was proud of herself because she was drinking smoothies. She had heard they were healthy. Her A1C was still a 9. Her fasting blood sugar was 197 mg/dl.
“What kind of things do you put in your smoothie, Brenda,” I said.
“Well I put a banana in, and a half cup of blueberries since they’re in season,” she said. “I have to put a few spo Continue reading

5 Ways To Take Control Of Your Diabetes

5 Ways To Take Control Of Your Diabetes

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and today we’re talking about 5 Ways to Take Control of Your Diabetes.
We’ve heard so many patients and clients say that their lives are over now that they have diabetes. But if you are one of the 30 million Americans with diabetes or 80 million with pre-diabetes, know that you have the power right at your fingertips to take control your diabetes.
What is Diabetes?
Diabetes is a condition in which sugar and starch are not properly used by the body, which then causes sugar levels in the blood to rise beyond normal ranges. There are two major types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune condition where the body is not able to produce enough insulin (a hormone produced in the pancreas that helps to regulate our blood sugar). People with type 1 diabetes typically need to take insulin for life. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes often happens when you develop insulin resistance — meaning, you are making insulin, but your body doesn’t use it properly.
Now that we have an overview, let’s get into the 5 ways you can take control, now!
1. Food
Diabetes is usually associated with carbohydrate restriction but that shouldn’t be the case! All foods have their place in a healthy, balanced diet as long as we have an understanding of which foods impact our blood sugar.
Our top nutrition tip for diabetes is to eat regularly and consistently each day. When we eat regularly, our blood sugar remains leveled throughout the day. This in turn, helps with avoiding Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes Finally Explained

Type 1 Diabetes Finally Explained

Let me say this with no exaggeration. My whole life, all day, all night, every day and each night is about keeping my blood sugar between the red and yellow lines. Whether I’m wearing, or not wearing, my continuous glucose monitor (CGM), screen pictured below.
(The little white dots between the red and yellow lines are my blood sugar levels every five minutes. The 99 mg/dl (5.4 mmol/l) was my blood sugar level the moment I took this photo. The larger white dots are glare from the camera.)
I just explained this “staying between the lines” to my mother, now being able to visibly show her on my monitor what I’ve long tried to tell her: Type 1 diabetes is a tightrope walk — all day and all night taking action to anticipate, prevent and recover from my blood sugar going too high and too low.
My life is, and will forever be, staying between the lines.
I got diabetes in February 1972 when I was 18 years old. I’m now 60. I’ve had diabetes more than four decades, more than two-thirds of my life. I have no memory of what life was like before “staying between the lines.”
Type 1 diabetes is the other diabetes. The one you don’t hear about on TV commercials — that’s Type 2 diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes produce insulin but not enough or their body doesn’t use it effectively.
While people with Type 2 diabetes also must keep their blood sugar between the lines, it doesn’t require as intense effort. Even for those who take insulin, certain hormones they have that Type 1s lack, help to regulate their after meal blood sugars from rising too high and offset Continue reading

The Friends & Family Guide to Type 1 Diabetes

The Friends & Family Guide to Type 1 Diabetes

Maybe it’s the friend’s child next door or a member in the family who has Type 1 diabetes. Perhaps you’ll be in charge of care at some point or are simply interested in learning more about T1. Consider this guide to help you navigate Type 1 as a friend or family member.
What is Type 1?
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that affects a person’s pancreas. The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, a hormone people need to get energy from food. Our pancreas, for reasons that have not been identified, does not produce any insulin. As a result, we need to inject or continually infuse insulin through a pump and carefully balance our insulin doses with eating and daily activities. We must also regularly monitor our blood-sugar levels. Type 1 is a non-stop and 24/7 balancing act that we must maneuver every day. There is no way to prevent Type 1 and there is no cure (currently!).
How do you manage it?
We get by with a little help from our friends! These include our glucose meter, insulin, needles, and monitors. The glucose meter is a device that measures blood sugar. We use a device that pricks our finger and we put the blood sample onto a test strip. From there, the test strip is read by the meter and gives us a number on the meter screen.
We can get insulin into our bodies through multiple daily injections or an insulin pump.
Injections are delivered to our bodies through insulin pens and needles. There are two types of insulin that we use. Fast-acting insulin gives our bodies insulin right away and is taken with meals or to correct a high blood sugar. Fast-a Continue reading

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