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FDA Approves First "artificial Pancreas" For Type 1 Diabetes

FDA approves first

FDA approves first "artificial pancreas" for type 1 diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first automated insulin delivery system -- a so-called “artificial pancreas” -- for people with type 1 diabetes.
“This first-of-its-kind technology can provide people with type 1 diabetes greater freedom to live their lives without having to consistently and manually monitor baseline glucose levels and administer insulin,” Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in an agency news release.
The device -- Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G -- is what’s known as a hybrid closed-loop system. That means it monitors blood sugar and then delivers necessary background (also known as basal) insulin doses. The device will also shut off when blood sugar levels drop too low.
However, this device isn’t yet a fully automated artificial pancreas​. People with type 1 diabetes will still need to figure out how many carbohydrates are in their food, and enter that information into the system, the agency noted.
Medtronic said the new device will be available by Spring 2017. The FDA approval is currently only for people aged 14 and older. The company is now conducting clinical trials with the device in younger patients.
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease caused by a mistaken attack on healthy insulin-producing cells in the body, destroying them. Insulin is a hormone necessary for ushering sugar into cells in the body and brain to provide fuel for the cells. People with type 1 must replace the insulin their bodies no longer produce, through multiple daily injections or Continue reading

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Ten Foods That Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Help Prevent Diabetes

Ten Foods That Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Help Prevent Diabetes

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When it comes to protecting yourself against diabetes, heart disease, and metabolic syndrome, diet is one of the most effective tools available. By choosing foods that moderate blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity, it’s possible to prevent disease and keep your body lean and healthy.
This article provides a list of ten foods that have been shown in studies to improve insulin health and balance blood sugar. Before we get to the list, it should be noted that strength training and an active lifestyle are essential for insulin health. One of the primary predictors of diabetes is lack of physical activity.
For best results, put just as much effort into being physically active as you do into optimizing your diet.
Blueberries are packed with bioactive antioxidants that improve insulin action, possibly by lowering markers of inflammation. A recent study found that obese, insulin resistant volunteers who consumed blueberry smoothies for 6 weeks significantly improved insulin sensitivity compared to a placebo group. Take note that the subjects removed other foods from their diet to offset the calories in the blueberry smoothie so as not to gain body fat over the course of the study.
Vinegar improves pancreatic function so that your body releases less insulin in response to the carbs your eat. This is useful because when you eat high-glycemic carbs, such as bread, cookies, or fruit juice, the pancreas tends to overestimate the amount of insulin needed, releasing too much, which is associated with inflammation and blood sugar imbalances.
Similar to blueberries, leafy gre Continue reading

Healing After Surgery: Concerns and Expectations for People with Diabetes

Healing After Surgery: Concerns and Expectations for People with Diabetes

For diabetics who eat well, exercise and have excellent blood sugar control, the incidence of post-surgery problems is not much higher than for non-diabetics.
The risk of slow wound-healing and post-surgical infection increases with years having diabetes, difficult to control or poorly controlled blood glucose, and the presence of diabetes complications such as neuropathy (nerve damage).
The possibility of slow wound-healing is owed to the effects of high glucose on blood vessels and nerves, and the risk of infection is greater when healing is slow.
Slow Healing, Sensitive Nerves and Infection
Post-surgical tissue repair requires our smallest blood vessels to carry nutrients and oxygen to organs and nerves. When these blood vessels are damaged by the effects of high blood sugar, the healing process is slowed, and our nerves get stressed.
If our nerves do not receive adequate oxygen they are forced to work harder, just as we breathe harder when the atmosphere is thin. The nerves become irritated which may cause prolonged or increased post-surgery discomfort. Constant irritation can damage the nerves.
When a surgical incision is slow to heal, bacteria have increased opportunity to enter and enjoy the nutrient rich sugar buffet inside our body. Severely damaged nerves may not register the pain and swelling caused by the bacterial invasion.
The potential for an infection increases if the incision is on an extremity such as a hand or foot, where blood vessel and nerve damage can be more severe.
Infection and High Blood Sugar
Once within our body, bacteria reproduce quickly and b Continue reading

A New Paradigm for Cancer, Diabetes and Obesity in Companion Animals

A New Paradigm for Cancer, Diabetes and Obesity in Companion Animals

Our mission has always been to provide information that will help pet parents to make the best choices when deciding on how to feed their companion animals and achieve optimal wellness.
We provide foods that are often the solution to a guardian’s quest to find nutritional answers to chronic or recurring health problem. To that end, we have, for over 30 years, provided foods that help pet parents to feed their companions a daily diet that is made from fresh, safe and healthy ingredients. We have seen miraculous improvements in so many dogs, cats and birds and we have helped healthy animals to remain healthy.
In our quest to provide continuing education and cutting edge information on animal nutrition we continue to search for the newest research available.
We recently attended the 2nd Annual Conference on Nutritional Ketosis and Metabolic Therapeutics in Tampa, Florida where we were privileged to hear scientists, doctors, veterinarians and researchers from around the world discussing the benefits of a ketogenic diet for humans and animals.
There is a great deal of evidence that this diet may help certain conditions such as seizures, and other neurological conditions, cancer, obesity and diabetes in both humans and animals.
What is a Ketogenic Diet?
This diet is high in fat, supplies adequate protein and is low in carbohydrates. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body. Fat is converted in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. Another effect of the diet is that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance. An elevated level of ketone b Continue reading

Diabetes warning: THIS is why you should never go to bed drunk

Diabetes warning: THIS is why you should never go to bed drunk

Regularly missing out on sleep can lead to a number of serious conditions.
“In the long term, poor sleep has been linked to an increased risk of numerous serious illnesses such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression and even some cancers,” said Dr Neil Stanley, a sleep expert.
While traffic noise or a snoring partner will not help, certain lifestyle habits can affect our sleep quality.
These include drinking alcohol too close to bedtime.
It takes an hour to break down one unit of alcohol - the equivalent to a third of a pint of beer - which you need to take into account if you are drinking in the evening and want to sleep well.
According to the NHS, even a small amount of alcohol in your system when you fall asleep can cause a problem.
It takes an hour to break down one unit of alcohol - the equivalent to a third of a pint of beer - which you need to take into account if you are drinking in the evening.
A 24-hour sleep guide, created by Furniture Village, suggested that if you plan to fall asleep by 11.30pm it is best to have your last drink by 7pm.
Similarly, the guide recommended eating dinner no later than 8pm - or at least three hours before bed.
Fri, August 19, 2016
Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition.
Dr Stanley also warned against scrolling on your phone just before bed.
“Give yourself the best shot at switching off, by switching off. Reduce blue light and avoid looking at digital devices and Continue reading

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