diabetestalk.net

Father Devises A 'Bionic Pancreas' To Help Son With Diabetes

Father Devises A 'Bionic Pancreas' To Help Son With Diabetes

Father Devises A 'Bionic Pancreas' To Help Son With Diabetes

An alarm sounds on Ed Damiano's night stand in the middle of the night. He jumps out of bed and rushes into his son's room next door.
His son, David, has Type 1 diabetes. The 15-year-old sleeps hooked up to a monitor that sounds an alarm when his blood sugar gets too low. If it drops sharply, David could die in his sleep.
"The fear is that there's going to be this little cold limb, and I screwed up. It's all on me," Damiano says.
But when he touches David's hand, he's warm. He's OK. Damiano says, "That's the moment of relief."
The father has been doing this night after night since his son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 11 months old.
But Damiano has done more than nightly monitoring to try to protect his son. He's an associate professor of biomedical engineering at Boston University, and has shifted the focus of his career to developing a better way to care for people with Type 1 diabetes.
"It's intimidating when you start considering the list of things that influence blood sugar," he says. "Emotions and physical activity, if you're healthy. You can't possibly take into account and balance all those things. And sometimes you get it right. And often you get it wrong."
Damiano has developed a system he calls a "bionic pancreas" designed to help people better manage their blood sugar. He's racing to get it approved by the Food and Drug Administration before his son leaves for college in three years.
In tests with 52 teenagers and adults, the device did a better job controlling blood sugar than the subjects typically did on their own. The results were reported S Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Betalin Aims To End Insulin Injections By Treating Type 1 Diabetes With Cell Transplants

Betalin Aims To End Insulin Injections By Treating Type 1 Diabetes With Cell Transplants

Of the 382 million people who have diabetes, only five to 10 percent have Type 1 Diabetes. However, unlike like Type 2 Diabetes, which can be prevented with regular exercise and a healthy diet, Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease that destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Usually diagnosed in childhood, Type 1 Diabetes is traditionally treated with daily insulin injections, and though some prick-less therapies have surfaced, they have not achieved long-term insulin independence.
But Israeli biotech startup Betalin Therapeutics may change that, making insulin injections a thing of the past.
Functioning as a gatekeeper, insulin is a hormone that enables sugar from consumed food to enter cells in the body. Without insulin, sugar builds up in the bloodstream, where it can cause life-threatening complications. Anyone who has Type 1 Diabetes needs lifelong insulin therapy, administered through daily shots or a pump because insulin typically cannot be taken orally due to interfering stomach enzymes.
SEE ALSO: Israelis, Palestinians Join Forces To Explore Local Flowers To Combat Cancer, Diabetes
However, the problem with both modes of treatment is that patients must monitor their blood sugar levels and administer the correct dose of insulin throughout the day. And even the most vigilant monitoring doesn’t prevent a sudden spike or drop in blood sugar levels. In other words, patients and doctors can only treat Type 1 Diabetes reactively.
Some researchers have been looking for a more proactive and automated approach, namely through transplanting healthy pancreatic Continue reading

What About Type 1 Diabetes?

What About Type 1 Diabetes?

You hear a lot about type 2 diabetes on this and other sites in the community. It’s easy to see why: type 2 diabetes is the “lifestyle” diabetes, the preventable one, the one that “doesn’t have to happen” and that you can “fix if you just dial in the food.” All true, for the most part. Whether you’re in the camp that thinks it’s red meat or egg yolks causing it, or fatty liver from excess PUFAs and fructose, the point is that people commonly accept the idea that T2D is preventable and manageable with the right diet and lifestyle. But what about type 1 diabetes? Why don’t we hear so much about it?
First of all, it’s rarer than T2D. For better or for worse, there simply isn’t as large an audience for stuff about type 1 diabetes. Second, type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. In T1D, the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin in the body are destroyed by an autoimmune attack. Left untreated without exogenous infusions of insulin, T1D results in severely elevated blood sugar and, eventually, death. Autoimmune diseases are confusing, tricky, and hard to manage. I mean, your body is attacking itself and preventing a completely necessary physiological function – insulin release! It’s not something you want to mess around with. It’s not a subject you can tackle lightly.
And I think that’s why people have steered clear of making any absolute recommendations regarding T1D and Primal or paleo. That said, we can make some general recommendations, I think, that won’t cause many problems and can even help solve some of them (with a doctor Continue reading

How to Beat Diabetes Burnout

How to Beat Diabetes Burnout

“I felt as if I couldn't do it anymore. So I didn't,” explains Sarah Kaye, a mother of two, now 31 years old, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as a preschooler.
Sarah is talking about burnout. Diabetes burnout. The phrase can mean so many different things to anyone who lives with any type of diabetes, and it can be triggered by any number of events or by nothing more than the daily physical and mental burden of living this disease.
“In my own practice,” explains William Polonsky, MD, founder of the Diabetes Behavioral Institute and author of Diabetes Burnout. “I have met far too many people who, because of diabetes burnout, have chosen to ignore their diabetes for years or, in some cases, decades. They are male and female, young and old, new to diabetes and veterans of the disease. They are not bad, stupid, or weak people. They are normal folks who are struggling with diabetes for understandable reasons. And their struggles take many shapes.”
While some feel helpless and defeated by the disease, explains Dr. Polonsky, others’ burnout may be the result of denial an "never truly accepting the reality of diabetes in their lives."
But all forms, no matter the severity or the duration, qualify as burnout.
Checking Out
For Sarah, burnout is something she has endured at least five or six times in the past 27 years of pricking her fingers, counting carbs, taking insulin and hoping it’s somewhat close to the amount her pancreas would’ve given her in an effort to avoid frustrating high blood sugars and exhausting low blood sugars.
“I think of burnout as the Continue reading

Diabetes: Tenth of adults at risk of disease by 2035

Diabetes: Tenth of adults at risk of disease by 2035

Enable it in your browser or download Flash Player here.
Sorry, you need Flash to play this.
Professor Rubino says increasing the number of operations would save the NHS money
Health experts are warning that one in 10 adults in the UK will be at risk of developing diabetes by 2035.
For the first time, Public Health England forecasts the number of people with the disease could top five million if obesity rates continue to increase.
About 90% of patients have type 2 diabetes, which is linked to being overweight.
A separate analysis says the cost of treating the UK's "diabetes epidemic" could soar to 17% of the NHS budget.
Experts are warning the burden of treating diabetes, especially new cases of type 2, could bankrupt the NHS.
Enable it in your browser or download Flash Player here.
Sorry, you need Flash to play this.
Paul Dibbins cut off two toes when they went gangrenous.
Statisticians at Public Health England have published a new forecast for the number of people who will develop diabetes in the coming years.
Their analysis includes type one, which is an auto-immune disease and accounts for about 10% of cases in the UK.
But the remaining 90% have type 2, which can be affected by where you come from and your family history, but in most cases is associated with being overweight.
In 2015, there were around 3.8 million people living with diabetes in England alone.
If obesity rates remain stable, Public Health England predicts that by 2035 that figure could have leapt to 4.9 million.
But if obesity rates increase by 3% every five years, an extra 263,000 people will have devel Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • FDA approves 'artificial pancreas' to manage diabetes

    (Medtronic) Federal regulators have approved a first-of-a-kind "artificial pancreas," a device that can help some diabetes patients manage their disease by constantly monitoring their blood sugar and delivering insulin as needed. The device from Medtronic was approved Wednesday for patients with Type 1 diabetes, the kind usually diagnosed during childhood. About 5 percent of the nation's 29 millio ...

  • FDA approves first ‘artificial pancreas’ for diabetes treatment

    The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first so-called artificial pancreas, an out-of-body device expected to lift the burden for some diabetics on the daily grind they must go through to keep their blood sugar levels stable. It will be available next spring for patients with type 1 diabetes who are over age 14. The device, which looks like a smartphone, is designed to automati ...

  • Alabamian with diabetes built her own artificial pancreas, gives away plan for free

    Dana Lewis is a good name to remember the next time you hear somebody say Alabama's mostly good for football and barbecue. Lewis, a University of Alabama graduate who grew up in Huntsville, used social media, computer skills and mail-order parts to invent an artificial pancreas for people with diabetes. Along with co-inventor and husband Scott Leibrand, she's now giving her discovery away. The dev ...

  • A Fasting Diet Could Reverse Diabetes And Repair The Pancreas, Says New Research

    Researchers have been able to reverse symptoms of diabetes and restore pancreas functions in mice by putting them on a version of the fasting-mimicking diet. The diet tricks the body into a fasting mode for a few days a month, even while carefully selected foods are still being eaten, and it could be enough to reboot the organ's key functions and restore insulin production, scientists say. Diabete ...

  • JDRF Celebrates Historic Artificial Pancreas Success Bringing Life-changing Benefits to People with Type 1 Diabetes

    If your question was not addressed in the recording, please send it to [email protected] FDA Approves Medtronic Hybrid Closed Loop System On September 28, 2016, the type 1 diabetes (T1D) community reached a major breakthrough with the FDA's approval of the Medtronic hybrid closed loop system. The system is the first ever approved to automate the dosing of insulin to reduce high blood sugar levels. Th ...

  • Losing Just 1 Gram of Fat in The Pancreas Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

    Losing a single gram of fat could be enough to reverse the symptoms of type 2 diabetes – as long as that fat comes from the pancreas, researchers in the UK have shown. It's already known that weight loss can greatly help manage type 2 diabetes – a progressive condition where the body either stops being able to produce enough insulin, or becomes insensitive to it – but this is the first time ...

  • Artificial pancreas offers hope to diabetes patients

    An artificial pancreas developed by Boston researchers shows considerable promise to dramatically change the treatment of type 1 diabetes, potentially enabling 2 million Americans to eat what they want without counting carbohydrates or calculating insulin injections, researchers announced Sunday. Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and Boston University developed the experimental dev ...

  • What Role Does the Pancreas Play in Diabetes?

    For many of us, we first learned of the pancreas in a middle school biology class, the name sticking with us because it was kind of funny. Even in those classrooms of the past, the organ – shaped a bit like an ear of corn – was usually upstaged in those early lectures on the digestive system in favor of bigger “stars” like the stomach or the intestines. It was a disservice because the panc ...

  • Diabetes Technology Inches Closer To An Artificial Pancreas

    Every person who uses insulin to manage diabetes wants what they don't have — a replacement for their malfunctioning pancreas. And though the technology isn't yet to the point of creating an artificial pancreas, it's getting a lot closer. Just last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a mobile app-based system that can monitor a person's sugar levels remotely. Parents can monitor ...

Related Articles