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Effect Of Fructose On Glycemic Control In Diabetes

Effect of Fructose on Glycemic Control in Diabetes

Effect of Fructose on Glycemic Control in Diabetes

OBJECTIVE The effect of fructose on cardiometabolic risk in humans is controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled feeding trials to clarify the effect of fructose on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (through 22 March 2012) for relevant trials lasting ≥7 days. Data were aggregated by the generic inverse variance method (random-effects models) and expressed as mean difference (MD) for fasting glucose and insulin and standardized MD (SMD) with 95% CI for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin. Heterogeneity was assessed by the Cochran Q statistic and quantified by the I2 statistic. Trial quality was assessed by the Heyland methodological quality score (MQS).
RESULTS Eighteen trials (n = 209) met the eligibility criteria. Isocaloric exchange of fructose for carbohydrate reduced glycated blood proteins (SMD −0.25 [95% CI −0.46 to −0.04]; P = 0.02) with significant intertrial heterogeneity (I2 = 63%; P = 0.001). This reduction is equivalent to a ∼0.53% reduction in HbA1c. Fructose consumption did not significantly affect fasting glucose or insulin. A priori subgroup analyses showed no evidence of effect modification on any end point.
CONCLUSIONS Isocaloric exchange of fructose for other carbohydrate improves long-term glycemic control, as assessed by glycated blood proteins, without affecting insulin in people with diabetes. Generalizability may be limited because most of the trials were <12 weeks and had relatively low MQS (<8). Continue reading

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So You know You’re a Person with Diabetes When?

So You know You’re a Person with Diabetes When?

Living with diabetes on a daily basis is challenging as it is. From the constant pokes with a needle to the monitoring of blood sugar levels, to counting carbs and more.
It is a never ending process, even when you are sleeping, chances are you’re dreaming of something diabetes related, or get woken up from a low or high blood sugar. Every once in a while, you probably just wish for a break from it all.
While unfortunately, you can’t necessarily take a break from diabetes, as much as you want to, you can change the way you think about things in a more positive light. When we dwell on the negativity that comes with the disease, it tends to take us over. In time you will notice that you no longer wake up happy, you instead wake up to the thought of doing everything to manage your diabetes all over again, like an endless cycle.
You May not have Control over Diabetes, But You Control Your Mind
I’m not a professional by any means, nor do I live with diabetes (type 1 or type 2) myself, but I am a mother of two children with type 1 diabetes. While the effects of what is happening in their body do not directly affect my body, I am still responsible for teaching these two kids how to live a happy, full life, despite the fact they have a chronic condition that will always be with them.
This is a huge responsibility! How they manage their diabetes when they are adults will be a direct impact of what I teach them during the years they are with me. Sure teaching them all the basics and necessary skills on how to test their blood sugar, count carbs, give insulin, etc. is all VERY im Continue reading

Study Finds No Link Between Baby Formula Made From Cow's Milk And Diabetes Risk

Study Finds No Link Between Baby Formula Made From Cow's Milk And Diabetes Risk

Could babies be at higher risk of developing Type 1 diabetes from drinking formula made from cow's milk? That idea has been circulating for some time but the evidence has been scant and contradictory. A study published Tuesday makes it seem less likely.
There are two types of diabetes, and both are on the rise. It's clear that a major driving force behind the increase of Type 2 diabetes, which mainly affects adults, is the eating habits that are also driving the rise of obesity.
A much bigger mystery is what has been propelling the increase of Type 1 diabetes (once called juvenile diabetes). This disease usually strikes children and takes hold when a child's immune system starts attacking cells in the pancreas that produce insulin.
Researchers in Finland have been trying to tease apart the role of cow's milk for many years. In 2010 they published some intriguing results. They looked at antibodies that appear to be part of the Type 1 diabetes process. Studying 230 infants, they found these antibodies were more common in babies who consumed formula produced from cow's milk, compared with babies who were fed a formula in which those milk proteins had been broken down.
The results from that small study only suggested that whole proteins from cow's milk are triggering the immune reaction that leads to type 1 diabetes. But if that proved to be the case, there would be an easy way to reduce the risk of the disease: simply make sure baby formula was based on degraded milk proteins rather than whole proteins.
To find out whether that would indeed work, the scientists devised a very Continue reading

I Have Type 2 Diabetes and Here’s What I Eat to Live Better

I Have Type 2 Diabetes and Here’s What I Eat to Live Better

Managing type 2 diabetes requires a careful combination of lifestyle factors, such as regular exercise, losing weight, and taking the proper medication. But, perhaps the most important step in fighting this disease is taking control of what you eat regularly.
After all, your diet not only affects your body weight—obesity is the main cause of developing type 2 diabetes—but it also impacts your blood sugar levels, which is essential to managing this metabolic disease. Eating the right foods will help to prevent blood sugar spikes (and dips) and keep your body weight in a healthy range.
Luckily, you can help control your diabetes by adopting a healthier lifestyle and making better food choices. Diabetes patient Seavey Bowdoin, 49, was able to put his diabetes in remission by changing what he eats. After Bowdoin completed the Why WAIT (Weight Achievement and Intensive Treatment) program, a 12-week intensive program focused on weight control and diabetes management, he has adopted healthier food habits. He revealed to Eat This, Not That! what he eats on a daily basis, including meals and snacks, and how he maintains his blood sugar and weight.
To review just how well Bowdoin’s diet can help to curb his diabetes symptoms and to identify any room for improvement, we reached out to a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) and Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN), Erin Spitzberg, who is the program manager at Fit4D, for her expert verdict for each meal and snack Seavey eats. Bowdoin and Spitzberg’s tips, along with the 26 Best and Worst Foods for Diabetics, can help you take c Continue reading

Proposed fee schedule details Diabetes Prevention Program payments

Proposed fee schedule details Diabetes Prevention Program payments

The 2018 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule proposed rule recently issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) includes proposals to boost coverage of diabetes prevention and telehealth services.
The CMS proposal includes “a number of positive changes that could improve patient care and save taxpayer dollars,” according to the AMA. Chief among these are a plan for expanding the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP), and new possibilities for telehealth services.
“The annual physician fee schedule update is a chance for CMS to modify Medicare policy to ensure the best possible treatment options for patients,” said AMA President David O. Barbe, MD (@DBarbe_MD). “The AMA is encouraged by many of the proposed changes and applauds the administration for working with the AMA to address physician concerns.”
Sept. 11 is the deadline to submit comments on the document’s proposed Medicare payment rules and policies—which includes an overall positive payment-rate update of 0.31 percent.
Diabetes Prevention Program setup
Included in the proposed rule are steps that would further implement a Medicare DPP, which the CMS describes as a structured intervention aimed at preventing a progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes in at-risk individuals. Previous research has shown that evidence-based lifestyle changes resulting in modest weight loss can sharply cut the rate at which people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes.
In a news release, the AMA said it “commends” CMS for going forward to expand coverage of the DPP model the Ass Continue reading

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