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Effect Of Eating Vegetables Before Carbohydrates On Glucose Excursions In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Effect of eating vegetables before carbohydrates on glucose excursions in patients with type 2 diabetes

Effect of eating vegetables before carbohydrates on glucose excursions in patients with type 2 diabetes

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The aim of this review was to evaluate whether eating vegetables before carbohydrates could reduce the postprandial glucose, insulin, and improve long-term glycemic control in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. We studied the effect of eating vegetables before carbohydrates on postprandial plasma glucose, insulin, and glycemic control for 2.5 y in patients with type 2 diabetes. The postprandial glucose and insulin levels decreased significantly when the patients ate vegetables before carbohydrates compared to the reverse regimen, and the improvement of glycemic control was observed for 2.5 y. We also compared the postprandial glucose and glucose fluctuations assessed by continuous glucose monitoring system for 72-h in patients with type 2 diabetes and subjects with normal glucose tolerance when subjects ate vegetables before carbohydrates and carbohydrates before vegetables in a randomized crossover design. The glycemic excursions and incremental glucose peak were significantly lower when the subjects ate vegetables before carbohydrates compared to the reverse regimen. This evidence supports the effectiveness of eating vegetables before carbohydrates on glucose excursions in the short-term and glycemic control in the long-term in patients with type 2 diabetes.
Keywords: type 2 diabetes, diet, eating order, postprandial glucose, glucose excursion
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Introduction
A significant number of patients with diabetes remain poorly controlled, mainly as a result of poor diet compliance.(1–3) The important choices that affect blood glucose control in people with diabe Continue reading

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Diabetes People : Brown Rice vs White Rice Consuming Tips | Truweight

Diabetes People : Brown Rice vs White Rice Consuming Tips | Truweight


By Shobha Shastry, Post updated on 2017/11/09 at 3:45 PM
Suhasini Mudraganam is a leading food scientist who was instrumental in designing the Truweight Food plan. She has done her MS in Nutrition from University of Missouri, USA and has over 14 years of global experience
Rice is the staple grain for most Indians. In many parts of the country, eating food is synonymous with eating rice. But the big question is, can people with diabetes consume rice?
The Diabesity (diabetes and obesity) epidemic
The epidemic of diabesity (diabetes and obesity) has risen rapidly; over 60 million people reportedly suffer from diabetes and the prevalence numbers of obesity and overweight is growing too. It is a belief that rice could make them fat and eating rice can lead to diabetes or high blood sugar levels.
So in light of this current diabesity epidemic, should one banish rice from the diet?
The answer is simple, eat rice which is unpolished or minimally polished. The whole grain brown rice is a nutritious grain but the processing lowers its nutritive value and makes it undesirable for health conditions like diabetes.
Processing Difference in Unpolished and Polished rice
Different stages of rice polishing: Brown rice to polished white one
Unpolished brown rice is the whole grain of rice with just the outer cover, the hull or the husk removed. Brown rice has three layers the outer bran, germ layer and the endosperm.Traditionally rice was either hand pound or parboiled. These minimal processing techniques retained most of the nutrients.
Book a free consultation for diabetes manage Continue reading

Diabetes: The Invisible Disease

Diabetes: The Invisible Disease


Managing diabetes doesnt mean you need to sacrifice enjoying foods you crave. Diabetes Self-Management offers over 900 diabetes friendly recipes to choose from including desserts, low-carb pasta dishes, savory main meals, grilled options and more.
Ive had a brutal three weeks. Let me share it with you:
I switched from multiple daily injections to an insulin pump about three weeks ago . I had spent 23 years on injections, and my level of control was pretty consistently good with it. I have fallen into the category of tight control for most of my diabetic life. But with all of the major pump manufacturers gearing up to introduce closed-loop systems (pumps that integrate with CGMs to actually adjust insulin levels to keep the user within a specified target range), and with the advice of my doctor that a pump means a better, more flexible way to manage insulin, I took the plunge.
The troubles started with the first infusion set. On my second night with the pump, an occlusion alarm woke me up, and my CGM blood sugar was reading 381. A fingerstick showed I was actually at about 420!! So, I changed the site. The replacement lasted three days, but my numbers were running significantly higher near the end of the last day. The next infusion set worked for the first one-and-a-half days. Then, I once again saw the sudden surging of blood sugar on my CGM, unexplained and totally out of the blue. I gave myself correcting insulin doses, and they had no effect. I pulled the plug when my blood sugars reached 300 (no occlusion alarm had gone off, but it would have soon enough).
I disco Continue reading

Lilly Diabetes Brings an Extra Splash of Summertime Fun and Inspiration to Diabetes Camps with Launch of Annual Camp Care Package Speaker Tour

Lilly Diabetes Brings an Extra Splash of Summertime Fun and Inspiration to Diabetes Camps with Launch of Annual Camp Care Package Speaker Tour




Lilly Diabetes Brings an Extra Splash of Summertime Fun and Inspiration to Diabetes Camps with Launch of Annual Camp Care Package Speaker Tour
This U.S. diabetes camp support program has provided speakers, scholarships, medicines and educational materials since 2001
INDIANAPOLIS (June 27, 2017) For the 22,000 children who attend diabetes camp each year, feelings of isolation that may accompany type 1 diabetes can be overcome by fun experiences and new friends who say, you are not alone. Lilly Diabetes understands the importance of the diabetes camp experience for those taking the first steps toward self-management and increased self-confidence. For more than 15 years, Lilly has been at the forefront of support with its Camp Care Package program. This year, Lillys diabetes ambassadors, all of whom have type 1 diabetes, will attend camps and share their stories starting July 4 at the Children with Diabetes Friends for Life conference.
The tour features camp veteran and four-time Olympic cross-country skier Kris Freeman, Nashville recording artist Crystal Bowersox, and NASCAR XFINITY Series driver Ryan Reed. The Lilly ambassadors will take part in small group talks and other camp activities, plus theyll have time Continue reading

Research Links Stress Hormone to Diabetes

Research Links Stress Hormone to Diabetes

Stress has long been known as a “silent killer” for its contributing role to many chronic diseases, including the six responsible for the most American deaths each year. Yet evidence is mounting that the nation’s growing problem with high-pressure living can exacerbate conditions like diabetes, making a once-manageable disease even more challenging to live with.
Research has found that both physical and mental stress can cause a cascade of hormonal reactions in the body that directly and indirectly impact blood glucose and insulin. When under pressure, our bodies produce cortisol, commonly referred to as “the stress hormone.” Elevated cortisol levels may increase risk factors for type 1 and 2 diabetes through their relationship with the body’s ability (or inability) to process blood sugar by way of insulin. What’s more, the added stress that comes from living with these diseases — including physical complications, special dietary concerns, and the financial burden of expensive prescriptions — can worsen symptoms, causing even higher stress levels, in what can become a vicious cycle.
The unfortunate reality is that the issue of stress and its impact on our health is unlikely to dissipate, given the combination of lifestyle factors, economic and societal pressures affecting today’s American. An annual survey conducted by the American Psychological Association has found a statistically significant uptick in the nation’s stress levels — even well ahead of the hectic holiday season. And it’s definitely impacting our collective health, with stress-relate Continue reading

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