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Eating Whey Protein Every Day Could Help Stop Diabetes

Eating whey protein every day could help stop diabetes

Eating whey protein every day could help stop diabetes

Nearly three million Britons suffer from Type 2 diabetes, where the body does not produce enough insulin or it fails to work properly.
Researchers discovered that whey protein, often used by athletes and weightlifters to improve fitness, stimulates the production of a gut hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which boosts insulin.
The study, carried out by researchers in Israel and published in the journal Diabetologia, involved 15 people with controlled Type 2 diabetes who were only taking diabetes drugs sulphonylurea or metformin for the condition.
It found that those who ate whey – sold in most health stores – before breakfast saw an instant increase in insulin production.
Professor Daniela Jakubowicz, of Tel Aviv University, said: “Consumption of whey protein shortly before breakfast increased the early and late post-meal insulin secretion, improved GLP-1 responses and reduced post-meal blood sugar levels in Type 2 diabetic patients.
“Whey protein may therefore represent a novel approach for enhancing glucose-lowering strategies in Type 2 diabetes.”
Professor Jakubowicz said that such treatment would be cheap and easy to administer, with patients able to use any brand of whey protein concentrate which has no added sugar or other nutrients.
Charity Diabetes UK gave the research a cautious welcome but warned that carrying out physical exercise and maintaining a healthy diet remained crucial.
Communications manager Dr Richard Elliott said: “While interesting, these results do not provide strong evidence that eating whey protein before meals is an effective Continue reading

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People With Diabetes Can Eat Eggs

People With Diabetes Can Eat Eggs

Many people with diabetes are concerned about eating eggs because they believe they are too high in cholesterol. It was once believed that eating dietary cholesterol could increase cholesterol in the blood, but this logic is no longer thought to be true. In fact, studies have shown that dietary cholesterol, like the cholesterol found in eggs, is not linked to high levels of cholesterol in the blood.
Dietary Cholesterol Not Linked to High Blood Cholesterol
While it is not uncommon for a person with type 2 diabetes to have other conditions like high cholesterol, dietary cholesterol consumption itself has not been linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels.
As for an overall relationship between egg consumption and type 2 diabetes, a June 2010 study published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition found no such relationship. Some experts recommend limiting eggs to no more than three yolks per week. This recommendation is mainly due to the saturated fat content found in the yolk rather than the cholesterol.
It's the Added Saturated That Will Get You
Excess intake of saturated fat (found in fried foods, process meats like sausage and bacon and sweets such as cookies, cake, and candy) can raise your blood cholesterol. And while two eggs have less saturated fat than a small hamburger, if you cook your eggs in butter, top them with full fat cheese or pair them with bacon or sausage, you are bound to eat too much saturated.
In fact, some study results have shown a link between egg intake and high cholesterol or diabetes may be skewed based on the presence of other high-fat breakfast Continue reading

9 Diabetes-Friendly Grocery Shopping Tips

9 Diabetes-Friendly Grocery Shopping Tips

Walking into a grocery store unprepared can be a challenge for anyone. Throw type 2 diabetes into the mix, and shopping for food can be downright overwhelming. But by following some simple tips, you can master your grocery shopping and learn how to stock your fridge with foods for a healthy diabetes diet.
Your first tip? In general, you want to focus on fresh foods in their original form — fruits, vegetables, fish, and lean protein. “I recommend that people with diabetes eat foods with the shortest lists of ingredients possible,” says Gregory Dodell, MD, an endocrinologist at Mount Sinai St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City.
Next, use these nine strategies to get the most nutrients for your money every time you go grocery shopping.
Map out your week’s menu in advance. “A must-do before you head to the grocery store is to plan your menu for the week,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies. “After you plan what you’ll make, take inventory of what you have in stock and write out your grocery list.” She suggests designating one day a week to do your planning and shopping. “Planning ahead makes it less stressful and much easier to follow a healthy eating plan,” she explains.
Don’t shop on an empty stomach. It’s not just an old wives’ tale. “When we’re hungry, we tend to crave the most calorically dense foods as a survival mechanism,” Dr. Dodell says. “And if a person with type 2 diabetes has low blood sugar, he or sh Continue reading

Perioperative Diabetes mellitus management

Perioperative Diabetes mellitus management

1. PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS SPEAKER Dr. DHARMRAJ SINGH MODERATOR Dr. SHASHI PRAKASH
2. INTRODUCTION  Patients with diabetes have higher incidence of morbidity and mortality.  Poor peri-operative glycaemic control increases the risk of adverse outcomes.  Treatment of post-operative hyperglycaemia reduces the risk of adverse outcomes.
3. CRITERIA FOR DIAGNOSIS OF DIABETES 1. Symtoms of diabetes plus random plasma glucose level >200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) 2. Hemoglobin A1C ≥ 6.5 % 3. Fasting plasma glucose level ≥ 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) 4. Two-hour plasma glucose level ≥ 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) American Diabetes Association
4. METABOLIC SYNDROME At least three of the following  Fasting plasma glucose ≥ 110 mg/dl  Abdominal obesity (waist girth > 40 [in men], 35 [in women])  Serum triglycerides ≥ 150mg/dl  Serum HDL cholesterol < 40 mg/dl (men), <50 (women)  BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg  Insulin-resistant syndrome is a constellation of clinical & biochemical characteristics frequently seen in pt with or at risk of type 2 diabetes.
5. THE METABOLIC RESPONSE TO SURGERY AND THE EFFECT OF DIABETES Metabolic effects of starvation: 1. Period of starvation induces a catabolic state. 2. It will stimulate secretion of counter-regulatory hormones . 3. It can be attenuated in patients with diabetes by infusion of insulin and glucose (approximately 180g/day). Metabolic effects of major surgery. It causes neuroendocrine stress response with release of counter- regulatory hormones (epinephrine, glucagon, cortisol and growth hormone) and of Continue reading

Glycemic Load: The Key to a Smarter Diabetes Diet

Glycemic Load: The Key to a Smarter Diabetes Diet

Once you’ve mastered counting carbs, just a little more math will let you fine-tune your diabetes diet plan. Figuring out the glycemic load of a food can help you craft a menu that won’t put your blood sugar on a roller coaster.
Understanding Glycemic Index vs. Glycemic Load
Beyond carbohydrate counting, you might already be looking at the glycemic index (GI) number, which tells you how quickly your blood sugar might spike after eating a certain type of food. The GI of carb-based foods is a measurement of how quickly blood sugar rises after eating in comparison to a slice of white bread, which has a GI of 100. In general, the lower the GI number, the less dramatically the food will affect blood sugar. Low-GI foods are generally 55 or less.
However, calculating the glycemic load (GL) can provide an even more accurate picture of what that food will do to your blood sugar. “Glycemic load accounts for carbohydrates in food and how much each gram of it will raise your blood sugar level,” says Krista Wennerstrom, RD, food and nutrition services director at Thorek Memorial Hospital in Chicago.
To find a food’s GL, multiply its GI by the number of carbohydrate grams in a serving, and then divide by 100. A low GL is between 1 and 10; a moderate GL is 11 to 19; and a high GL is 20 or higher. For those with diabetes, you want your diet to have GL values as low as possible.
As an example, an average cake-type doughnut has a GI of 76 and 23 carbohydrate grams. Multiply 76 by 23 and then divide by 100, and you get 17.48, which is close to the top of the moderate range for glyce Continue reading

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