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Dogs Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes

Dogs Cured of Type 1 Diabetes

Dogs Cured of Type 1 Diabetes

Beagles no longer showed diabetes symptoms following a single course of gene therapy.
Gene therapy has successfully banished type 1 diabetes in dogs, the first time this treatment has worked to treat the disease in a large animal, according to a study published online in the journal Diabetes earlier this month (February 1).
For the study, Spanish researchers induced diabetes in beagles between 6 months and 1 year old. They then injected the dogs’ skeletal muscles with viruses carrying genes for insulin and glucokinase, an enzyme involved in processing glucose. Following the treatment, the researcher confirmed that the genes had been incorporated into the DNA of the dogs, which were able to regulate their own blood sugar levels without medical help. And when they exercised, they no longer had episodes of hypoglycemia.
Dogs that were injected with viruses carrying only the gene for insulin or only the gene for glucokinase continued to have symptoms of diabetes, indicating that the genes acted in concert.
Following more tests in dogs, the researchers hope to try out the treatment in humans. But sources warned New Scientist that the treatment might not work the same way in humans that it did in canines, as the dogs’ diabetes was induced by chemically destroying pancreas cells that produce insulin. In naturally occurring type 1 diabetes, on the other hand, the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells.
Still, “this work is an interesting new avenue which may give us a completely new type of treatment,” Matthew Hobbs, head of research at Diabetes UK, told New Sci Continue reading

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Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (known as type 2 diabetes) is a metabolic disorder in which the cells of the body become resistant to insulin and/or the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. Your body needs insulin to regulate the levels of sugar (glucose) in your bloodstream.
Type 2 diabetes often goes hand in hand with obesity, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. It is increasingly affecting younger people and some people with type 2 diabetes have to use insulin.
Symptoms
Type 2 diabetes often develops with no symptoms at all or the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed. For this reason, blood glucose testing is important because it can detect diabetes early and allow prompt treatment to prevent complications developing.
The symptoms of diabetes may include:
fatigue (tiredness);
feeling abnormally thirsty;
increasing hunger;
increasing urination;
blurred vision; and
frequent infections and slow healing of sores or wounds.
What causes type 2 diabetes?
Type 2 diabetes doesn’t develop overnight. It usually begins with insulin resistance, where the body’s cells can’t use insulin properly. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream, and the pancreas keeps on producing insulin to try and get the blood glucose level down. Over time, the pancreas loses its ability to secrete enough insulin. This can eventually result in the person with type 2 diabetes having to inject insulin every day.
The good news is that because it doesn’t develop overnight, if people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes are identified early enough, they may be able to take measures to avoid it.
Thi Continue reading

Pills or Paleo? Preventing and Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Pills or Paleo? Preventing and Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

The incidence of type 2 diabetes continues to skyrocket, but current drug treatments are inadequate and potentially dangerous. The Paleo diet offers a safe and effective alternative.
This article is the first in an ongoing series that compares a Paleo-based diet and lifestyle with medication for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease. Stay tuned for future articles on high blood pressure, heartburn/GERD, autoimmune disease, skin disorders, and more.
Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes have reached epidemic proportions. In the U.S. today, someone dies from diabetes-related causes every ten seconds, and recent reports suggest that one-third of people born in 2010 will develop diabetes at some point in their lives.
Find out how the Paleo diet can prevent and even reverse diabetes naturally.
What is particularly horrifying about this statistic is that many of those who develop diabetes will be kids. Type 2 diabetes used to be a disease of the middle-aged and elderly. No longer. A recent Yale study indicated that nearly one in four kids between the ages of four and eighteen have pre-diabetes. And some regional studies show that the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children and young adults has jumped from less than 5 percent before 1994 to 50 percent in 2004.
It’s clear that type 2 diabetes is one of the most significant and dangerous health problems of our times, and we desperately need safe and effective treatments that won’t bankrupt our health care system. With this in mind, let’s compare two possible ways of addressing type 2 diabetes: Continue reading

Anti-Stress Compound Reduces Obesity and Diabetes Risk

Anti-Stress Compound Reduces Obesity and Diabetes Risk

Summary: A protein associated with anxiety and depression has been found to act as a link between the stress regulatory system and metabolic processes, research report.
Source: Max Planck Institute.
For the first time, scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich could prove that a stress protein found in muscle has a diabetes promoting effect. This finding could pave the way to a completely new treatment approach.
For some time, researchers have known that the protein FKBP51 is associated with depression and anxiety disorders. It is involved in the regulation of the stress system – when the system does not function properly; mental disorders may develop. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry have discovered a new, surprising role for this protein: It acts as a molecular link between the stress regulatory system and metabolic processes in the body.
“FKBP51 influences a signaling cascade in muscle tissue, which with excessive calorie intake leads to the development of glucose intolerance, i.e., the key indicator of diabetes type 2,” project leader Mathias Schmidt summarizes. An unhealthy diet, rich in fat means stress for the body. If FKBP51 is increasingly produced in the muscle it leads to reduced absorption of glucose – as a result, diabetes and obesity may develop.
If FKBP51 is blocked, diabetes will not develop, even if too many calories are consumed or the body is still stressed. Less FKBP51 in the muscle tissue means reduced glucose intolerance and thus maintenance of normal metabolism.
If FKBP51 is blocked, diabetes wi Continue reading

The Global Diabetes Epidemic, Brought to You by Global Development

The Global Diabetes Epidemic, Brought to You by Global Development

The link between economic growth and the worldwide diabetes epidemic, explained
Diners in Shanghai eat at a Kentucky Fried Chicken outlet. (Aly Song/Reuters)
As globalization exports our culture across the world, it also spreads our health problems. For much of the 20th century, a person's likelihood to develop type-2 diabetes depended as much on the wealth of their nation as their biology. Those living in the developed world survived to old age and eventually succumbed to "diseases of affluence": cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. In contrast, undernourishment, violence, and communicable diseases ravaged the health of residents of developing countries.
And this is the way things remain in the developed world: even in poor parts of the United States, almost no one dies of tuberculosis. But in low- and middle-income countries, the distinction fades. The "diseases of affluence" have embedded themselves in communities anything but affluent. Now, cholera strikes next door to cancer; the malnourished and diabetic share a roof.
In this new landscape of health in the developing world, the impact of diabetes is momentous. Since 1980, the number of diabetics worldwide has ballooned from 152 million to between 285 and 347 million today. Of these, three-quarters live in the developing world, where diabetes afflicts more than six times as many people as HIV. Why, if infectious diseases persist and life expectancies remain low, has diabetes taken such a toll on the health of the impoverished?
One explanation relies on a trio of social forces: aging population, urbanization, a Continue reading

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