diabetestalk.net

Does Diabetes Cause Dry Eyes?

Does Diabetes Cause Dry Eyes?

Does Diabetes Cause Dry Eyes?

Dry eye syndrome (DES), also known as keratoconjunctivitis sicca, is one of the most commonly diagnosed eye conditions, and people with diabetes are at higher risk for this disorder. In fact, research shows that those of us with diabetes can have up to a 50 percent chance of suffering from dry eye. Dry eye syndrome is almost always a condition affecting both eyes. Symptoms include:
a scratchy sensation that feels like fine grains of sand are in the eyes,
burning, itching, blurred, or fluctuating vision,
light sensitivity,
redness, and
increased watering of the eyes, despite the name dry eye syndrome.
What causes dry eye syndrome?
Did you know that tears consist of three layers?
Outer oil layer: Prevents evaporation from the surface of the eye.
Middle layer: Mostly made of water.
Inner mucus layer: Allows the middle, watery layer to adhere to the naturally water repellant surface of the eye.
People with dry eyes either don’t produce enough tears or their tears are of poor quality. An abnormality in any of these three layers can result in symptoms of dry eye, and effective treatment depends upon correctly diagnosing which layer(s) are causing the problem.
Most cases of dry eye are thought to be due to an insufficient amount of the middle, watery layer, which is normally released by a large tear gland (the lacrimal gland) under the rim of the upper and outer eye socket (some small, accessory tear glands are located within the eyelids as well).
Research shows that most cases of dry eye associated with diabetes are caused by insufficient production of tears due to autonomic ne Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
How Does Fenugreek Help Cure Diabetes?

How Does Fenugreek Help Cure Diabetes?

Diet rules the life of a diabetic. The minute this becomes a part of your life, every single food item you consume requires scrutiny.
But what if I tell you that you can continue to enjoy all your favorite foods (in moderation) if you add a magic ingredient in your diet? Sounds good? Read on to find out what we are talking about.
Fenugreek—A Brief
Scientific Name—Trigonella foenum-graecum
Origin—Western Asia, Southern Europe, and Middle-East
Other Names—Methi (Hindi), Mentulu (Telugu), Ventayam (Tamil), Uluva (Malayalam)
Abundantly available in the regions of North Africa, South Asia, and Mediterranean regions, fenugreek comes in two variants—bitter-tasting seeds and leaves—that are incredibly beneficial for treating diabetic conditions.
Almost all the medicinal properties of this ingredient can be attributed to the presence of various active compounds in it. Fenugreek contains phytochemical components and essential nutrients such as trigonelline, yamogenin, chlorine, calcium, copper, potassium, manganese, iron, zinc, and magnesium (1).
Apart from its medicinal applications, fenugreek also has some culinary significance. The seeds of fenugreek are used as a spice in many of the Indian recipes.
Diabetes For Diabetes – How Is It Helpful?
With millions of people being affected by this disease every minute, diabetes is turning out to be an epidemic, particularly in India.
No, I’m not kidding!
According to WHO, India holds the record of carrying the most diabetic cases in the millennium year (about 31,705,000) and is expected to grow over 100% in twenty years. Th Continue reading

Are peanuts good for diabetes? Effect on disease risk

Are peanuts good for diabetes? Effect on disease risk

Peanuts are common in the average American diet in the form of peanut butter, candy bars, and roasted and salted peanuts. But how may eating peanuts affect people with diabetes?
People with diabetes have to carefully consider their diet. As a result, many of those with the disease wonder if peanuts are fine to eat.
This article explores a few things that people with diabetes should be aware of before making the decision to eat peanuts.
Are nuts good for people with diabetes?
There is a lot of evidence that suggests nuts, on the whole, are good for the health. According to a study posted in Nutrients, nuts and peanuts are full of nutrients. They are often also rich in healthful substances such as:
Studies have linked eating nuts to a lower risk of certain heart diseases and gallstones. They may even help with high blood pressure, cholesterol, and inflammation.
While nuts are high in fat and calories, the research suggests that they may even help with weight loss. From this point of view, they are a much healthier option than other snacks, such as a bag of chips. There are some other factors to consider as well, with peanuts specifically.
Glycemic index of peanuts
The glycemic index (GI) is used to rate foods based on how slow or fast they cause an increase in blood sugar. Foods lower on the GI scale tend to be converted to sugar slowly and steadily. High GI foods release glucose quickly into the bloodstream.
People with diabetes are usually more aware of these numbers. They can inform the person if and when they need to take insulin, and what and when they can eat.
The GI sc Continue reading

The Benefits and Risks of Peanuts for People with Diabetes

The Benefits and Risks of Peanuts for People with Diabetes

Peanuts are packed with a variety of nutritious properties that may benefit people with type 2 diabetes. Eating peanuts and peanut products may help:
promote weight loss
lower the risk of cardiovascular disease
control blood sugar
prevent people from developing diabetes in the first place
However, peanuts also carry some potential risks. If you have type 2 diabetes, read on to learn more about the risks and benefits of eating peanuts.
Adding peanuts and peanut butter to your diet may be beneficial, especially if you have type 2 diabetes. While not technically nuts, peanuts provide many of the same health benefits as tree nuts, such as walnuts, almonds, and pecans. Peanuts are also less expensive than most other nuts, which is great if you’re looking to save money but still want the nutritional rewards.
Peanuts help control blood sugar
If you have diabetes, you need to consider the glycemic content of the foods you eat. Glycemic content is based on how quickly your body converts carbohydrates into glucose, or blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) is a 100-point scale that rates foods on how rapidly they cause blood sugar to rise. Foods that cause a rapid rise in blood sugar are given a higher value. Water, which has no effect on blood sugar, has a GI value of 0. Peanuts have a GI value of 13, which makes them a low GI food.
According to an article in the British Journal of Nutrition, eating peanuts or peanut butter in the morning may help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Peanuts may also help lessen the insulin spike of higher GI foods when paired together. One Continue reading

Is Splenda Safe for Diabetes?

Is Splenda Safe for Diabetes?

Remember when those little yellow sweetener packets started showing up next to the pink and blue packets in your local restaurant? Well, since its commercial introduction in 1999, Splenda has risen in popularity to take over 62 percent of the U.S. market share for artificial sweeteners.
But, should you be using Splenda? Is it safe for people with diabetes? Read on to find out the answers to these questions and more.
What Is Splenda?
Splenda is made from the FDA-approved artificial sweetener sucralose. The FDA reviewed over 110 human and animal studies on sucralose prior to approving it safe for consumption. In its review, it included studies that looked for links to cancer and reproductive and nerological issues. None were found.
An individual 1g packet of Splenda technically has 3.3 calories, however, this number is low enough to be considered "calorie-free" under FDA labeling laws. Interestingly, the low caloric content actually comes from bulking agents used in the production of Splenda, not sucralose.
As with other artificial sweeteners, Splenda is intensely sweet. In fact, sucralose is 600 times sweeter than table sugar.
In the U.S., Splenda is used as a sweetener in many pre-sweetened beverages and foods. It can be purchased as either individual packets or larger bulk packaged granuals, in both white and brown sugar baking forms.
(If you're having tea across the pond in the UK, however, you could also find Splenda available in tablet form.)
Which Foods Use Splenda?
Many "sugar-free" and "reduced-calorie" foods use artificial sweeteners to add a sweet flavor without ad Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

    Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar either because of the inability of the body to produce enough insulin or the inability to respond to the insulin so produced. It is classified as follows: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Glucose is the primary energy source in humans and its levels are majorly regulated by pancreatic insulin. Insulin faci ...

  • Does Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

    5 Ways to Beat Bad Breath Why Orgasms Feel Good WebMD Expert Answers: Is sugar the enemy? Where does/can it fit in the diet of someone with diabetes? ...

  • Why does obesity cause diabetes? You asked Google – here’s the answer

    ‘Cause” is a strong word. It means that A results in B happening. Causality is also surprisingly difficult to prove. Most medical studies only show association between A and B, while causality often remains speculative and frustratingly elusive. Obesity and diabetes are no exception. There are many types of diabetes. All are unified by elevated levels of blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes accounts f ...

  • Does Diabetes Cause Varicose Veins? What’s The Connection

    A varicose veins is a common problem which affects both men as well as women. Around 40 million people are known to be affected by this condition in which there is an acute pain in the body and the movement of the affected area becomes a problem. It is important to treat this because if the condition is allowed to grow, it may lead to serious threats such as thrombosis, blood clotting problems, ul ...

  • Does Diabetes Cause Boils?

    Skin infection is not an unheard complication in the case of diabetes patients. In the case of diabetes patients, the immune system of the body becomes weak and as such, a number of infections in the skin develop. These infections could also take the form of boils. In this article, we analyze and study the relationship between boils and diabetes. So, join in for the article “Does Diabetes Cause ...

  • How Does Diabetes Cause Atherosclerosis?

    Diabetes is known to cause a series of complications in the human body. It is a difficult condition and these complications caused due to diabetes make the disease even more difficult to manage. In today’s article, we shall learn more about one such condition called atherosclerosis caused due to inflammation and the disruption of blood vessels hindering the smooth flow of blood in different body ...

  • Does Diabetes Cause Rashes?

    There are a variety of rashes commonly experienced by those with diabetes. Some require treatment, and some disappear on their own. There are many comorbidities to diabetes and skin issues are high on the list. Diabetes can cause nerve damage as well as impair blood flow to skin cells, which makes the skin more susceptible to damage, infection and changes in color. Some Disorders are Considered Pr ...

  • Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

    Sugar has no part of causing Type 1 diabetes. That form of diabetes has multiple causes, probably including genetics and certainly including elements we don't yet understand. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, frequently occurs in overweight patients. In fact, the most common comorbidity in diabetes is obesity. But consuming sugar is not the only cause of obesity, and consuming sugar as a limited ...

  • Does Iron Overload Cause Diabetes and Heart Disease?

    Iron plays an essential role in many physiological processes, including oxygen transport and mitochondrial energy production. However, more iron is not necessarily better! The overaccumulation of iron in the body, a condition referred to as iron overload, has been implicated in the development of several chronic diseases, including diabetes and heart disease. Read on to learn why iron overload pro ...

Related Articles