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Does Diabetes Cause Boils?

Does Diabetes Cause Boils?

Does Diabetes Cause Boils?

Skin infection is not an unheard complication in the case of diabetes patients. In the case of diabetes patients, the immune system of the body becomes weak and as such, a number of infections in the skin develop. These infections could also take the form of boils. In this article, we analyze and study the relationship between boils and diabetes. So, join in for the article “Does Diabetes Cause Boils?”
What are Boils and What are Their Symptoms?
Boils are also known as skin abscesses and are mainly a skin infection. The area of the skin which is infected due to several causes such as poor nutrition, inadequate hygiene, diabetes, etc. becomes red and is characterized by the development of a lump in the area.
It is also defined as a collection of pus in one particular area of the skin and the more common areas where such an infection develops include the face, shoulders, armpits, and buttocks, amongst other places.
The signs and symptoms of boils include the following:
A red color bump in the area.
The skin around the area becomes painful, warm, as well as swollen
The patient may end up developing a fever.
The lymph nodes may swell up.
What are the Risk factors for Boils?
There are various risk factors which could lead to the development of boils in different parts of the skin. These factors include the following:
Kidney failure or any kidney related condition
Any weakness caused in the immune system of the body
Any other reason due to which the immune system of the body becomes weak
Condition where the body produces inadequate number of antibodies
Medicines and drugs tha Continue reading

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American Diabetes Association® Releases 2018 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, with Notable New Recommendations for People with Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

American Diabetes Association® Releases 2018 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, with Notable New Recommendations for People with Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

ARLINGTON, Va., Dec. 8, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Notable new recommendations in the 2018 edition of the American Diabetes Association's (ADA's) Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes (Standards of Care) include advances in cardiovascular disease risk management including hypertension; an updated care algorithm that is patient-focused; the integration of new technology into diabetes management; and routine screening for type 2 diabetes in high-risk youth (BMI >85th percentile plus at least one additional risk factor). The Standards of Care provide the latest in comprehensive, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of children and adults with type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes, strategies to improve the prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes, and therapeutic approaches that reduce complications and positively affect health outcomes. The Standards of Care are published annually and will be available online at 4:00 p.m. ET, December 8, 2017, and as a supplement to the January 2018 print issue of Diabetes Care.
Experience the interactive Multichannel News Release here: https://www.multivu.com/players/English/8010331-american-diabetes-association-standards-of-medical-care-2018/
Beginning in 2018, the ADA will update and revise the online version of the Standards of Care throughout the year with necessary annotations if new evidence or regulatory changes merit immediate incorporation. This will ensure that the Standards of Care provide clinicians, patients, researchers, health plans and policymakers with the most up-to-date components of diabetes care, gener Continue reading

'I beat diabetes with 200-calorie drinks'

'I beat diabetes with 200-calorie drinks'

Nearly half of patients have reversed type 2 diabetes in a "watershed" trial, say doctors in Newcastle and Glasgow.
People spent up to five months on a low-calorie diet of soups and shakes to trigger massive weight loss.
Isobel Murray, 65, who had weighed 15 stone, lost over four stone (25kg) and no longer needs diabetes pills. She says: "I've got my life back."
The charity Diabetes UK says the trial is a landmark and has the potential to help millions of patients.
Isobel, from Largs in North Ayrshire, was one of 298 people on the trial.
Her blood sugar levels were too high, and every time she went to the doctors they increased her medication.
So, she went on to the all-liquid diet for 17 weeks - giving up cooking and shopping. She even ate apart from her husband, Jim.
Instead, she had four liquid meals a day.
It is hardly Masterchef - a sachet of powder is stirred in water to make a soup or shake. They contain about 200 calories, but also the right balance of nutrients.
Isobel told the BBC it was relatively easy as "you don't have to think about what you eat".
Once the weight has been lost, dieticians then help patients introduce healthy, solid meals.
"Eating normal food is the hardest bit," says Isobel.
The trial results, simultaneously published in the Lancet medical journal and presented at the International Diabetes Federation, showed:
46% of patients who started the trial were in remission a year later
86% who lost 15kg (2st 5lb) or more put their type 2 diabetes into remission
Only 4% went into remission with the best treatments currently used
Prof Roy Taylor, from N Continue reading

Mortality and Cardiovascular Disease in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Mortality and Cardiovascular Disease in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Long-term trends in excess risk of death and cardiovascular outcomes have not been extensively studied in persons with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes.
We included patients registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Register from 1998 through 2012 and followed them through 2014. Trends in deaths and cardiovascular events were estimated with Cox regression and standardized incidence rates. For each patient, controls who were matched for age, sex, and county were randomly selected from the general population.
Among patients with type 1 diabetes, absolute changes during the study period in the incidence rates of sentinel outcomes per 10,000 person-years were as follows: death from any cause, −31.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], −56.1 to −6.7); death from cardiovascular disease, −26.0 (95% CI, −42.6 to −9.4); death from coronary heart disease, −21.7 (95% CI, −37.1 to −6.4); and hospitalization for cardiovascular disease, −45.7 (95% CI, −71.4 to −20.1). Absolute changes per 10,000 person-years among patients with type 2 diabetes were as follows: death from any cause, −69.6 (95% CI, −95.9 to −43.2); death from cardiovascular disease, −110.0 (95% CI, −128.9 to −91.1); death from coronary heart disease, −91.9 (95% CI, −108.9 to −75.0); and hospitalization for cardiovascular disease, −203.6 (95% CI, −230.9 to −176.3). Patients with type 1 diabetes had roughly 40% greater reduction in cardiovascular outcomes than controls, and patients with type 2 diabetes had roughly 20% greater reduction than controls. Reductions in fatal outcomes Continue reading

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth?
Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes
your teeth
your gums
your jaw
tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks
Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath.
Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control.
What happens if I have plaque?
Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis.
When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the Continue reading

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