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Does Bovine Insulin In Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Does Bovine Insulin in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Does Bovine Insulin in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

EquaYona: You raise a point that is often raised. Some thoughts for you: I think the RDA for calcium is based on how much you eat, not how much you absorb. Yes? So, I’m not sure that the comparison here makes sense?
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Another thought is that the RDA for calcium is way higher than it needs to be based on the available evidence, especially for people who are on a plant based diet. Dr. Greger recommends about 600 mg : http://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/12/dr-gregers-2011-optimum-nutrition-recommendations/ From what I have seen, that recommendation might even be higher than necessary. “…total calcium consumption among women in China, Peru, Sri Lanka, and many other non-Western countries is only about 500 milligrams a day, yet fracture rates are very low.” (from page 9 of Building Bone Vitality) And while the authors of Becoming Vegan, Express Edition recommend the RDA, they do acknowledge, “A somewhat ambiguous and predictable relationship exists between calcium and bone health. While the evidence generally supports a positive association between calcium intake and bone health, some populations who eat less than 400 mg of calcium per day have lower rates of osteoporosis than populations who consume more than 1,00 mg per day. This is because calcium *balance* is more critical than calcium intake.” (from page 41) That point about balance is key. There are a variety of factors in play, so requirements would be different for people depending on their diet and exercise.
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Another thought is that people really do eat 12 oz or more of greens a day. For example, people who f Continue reading

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Towards a Cure for Type 2 Diabetes

Towards a Cure for Type 2 Diabetes

Over 50% of American adults are estimated to have prediabetes or diabetes. The twin cycles (hepatic and pancreatic) are not simply rare metabolic mistakes leading to disease. These responses are almost universal because they serve as protective mechanisms.
Protective? I can almost hear you gasp. Insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction are protective? Yes. Absolutely. What do they protect us from? The very name gives us the vital clue. Insulin resistance protects the liver from too much insulin. Our body is resisting the excessive insulin, which is harmful.
Imagine the liver as a balloon that can be filled with sugar and fat, the two storage forms of food energy. Normally when we eat, insulin goes up, storing some of this food energy. When we stop eating, during fasting, insulin levels fall, releasing some of the stored energy for the rest of the body.
When insulin levels stay elevated for a prolonged period, the liver fills up with sugar and fat, like an over-inflated balloon. The pressure inside the liver goes up and up, making it increasingly difficult to move sugar into this overfilled liver. This is insulin resistance. The liver simply cannot store any, so rejects the incoming sugars, becoming resistant to insulin’s normal signal. Glucose piles up outside the cell in the blood.
This provokes a compensatory hyperinsulinemia. Like trying to inflate the over-inflated balloon, it works for a time. However, it becomes more and more difficult.
Ultimately, the liver was only trying to protect itself from the damaging effects of the high insulin. The problem is not the i Continue reading

Defective, Infectious Proteins Linked to Type 2 Diabetes

Defective, Infectious Proteins Linked to Type 2 Diabetes

More than one in ten people in the US have type 2 diabetes — that's over 29 million people. It's characterized by excessive sugar (glucose) in the blood due to the development of resistance to insulin, the hormone that normally metabolizes glucose.
Deposits of folded and clumped proteins in the pancreas are also common in type 2 diabetes. There, they may impact the ability of the pancreas to function properly. But, researchers from McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center have discovered that they could play a role in causing the disease.
The configuration of protein, including how it's folded, is one factor that contributes to its ability to function properly. The scientists found the abnormally folded protein that accumulates in diabetes can induce the symptoms of the disease. What's more, the protein is similar to an infectious protein found in diseases like Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Kuru, and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (mad cow disease).
Don't Miss: New Study Unveils the True Story of Kuru, a Fatal Brain Disease Spread by the Cultural Practice of Eating the Dead
Study researcher Claudio Soto and colleagues published their findings on August 1, in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.
Type 2 Diabetes
Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include frequent infections, hunger, fatigue, increased thirst and urination, and blurry vision, but some people have no symptoms for the first several years they have the disease. Lab tests to measure blood glucose, or A1C, a test that measures the glucose average over the last three months, can confirm th Continue reading

What is Type 2 Diabetes? Its Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & Diet

What is Type 2 Diabetes? Its Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & Diet

A tough life-long disease, Diabetes is something that affects the body’s functioning. It affects body’s glucose and blood sugar levels. Although diabetes has different types, the primarily seen ones are Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational.
We here would be looking into the Type 2 Diabetes in brief and shall seek answers for the same. Join in as we dig deep into ‘Type 2 Diabetes and its Causes, Symptoms, Treatment and Diet’.
Let’s start off then.
What is Type 2 Diabetes?
On a general note, our body’s pancreas is stimulated to produce insulin for the body. The insulin helps change the glucose obtained from the food into energy for the body. However, in the Type 2 Diabetes, the pancreas still produces the insulin but the body doesn’t use it as required upon. Also known by as insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes is seen commonly among the diabetic patients, the stats revealing at 85% of all diabetic patients.
The Root Cause of Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes is caused as a result of combination of different things like DNA, obesity, metabolic syndrome, broken beta cells and more. More so over, childhood obesity is one of the grave reasons for diabetes later in the adult age.
The disease is also seen in people with high blood pressure, high level of cholesterol, extra fat layers around the body and waist. For many, the high glucose production from liver also affects the way diabetes is contracted upon.
The Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes
There are different risk factors associated with Type 2 Diabetes. A few major things that affect highly in Type 2 Diabetes are-
Gene F Continue reading

How to Lower Your A1C Levels: More Steps You Can Take

How to Lower Your A1C Levels: More Steps You Can Take

You may be familiar with the “ABCs” of diabetes: A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol. This acronym is part of a larger diabetes campaign called “Know Your Numbers,” and hopefully you’re aware of all of your numbers — what they are, what they should be, and how often to get them checked. Obviously, knowing your A1C and knowing what you can do if it’s not at goal is a big part of diabetes management.
The focus last week and this week has been on all things A1C: what it is, what the general goal is, why it matters, and ways to get it to where it needs to be.
What else does it take to lower your A1C?
Figuring out how to lower your A1C to whatever your personal goal is can sometimes seem like solving a puzzle. You try something and it may or may not help, or it helps but not enough. Then you try something else. Yes, it can be frustrating, but eventually you’ll hit on a strategy that works for you. Last week, we looked at how a healthy eating plan (including keeping carbs consistent and sticking to an eating schedule) and a physical activity program can help. Research shows that an eating plan can lower A1C levels by 1–2%; physical activity can lower A1C by 0.6–1%, according to various studies. But what if these two strategies aren’t enough? Then what?
Time for medication?
Diabetes medicines generally lower A1C levels anywhere from 0.5% to as much as 3.5%. The A1C-lowering effect of medicines can vary from person to person, however, and the effect is often dependent upon how high the A1C is to begin with.
Insulin. We know that people who have Type 1 diabete Continue reading

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