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Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Difference between Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus

Difference between Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Mellitus It is characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood sugar level), glycosuria (glucose in urine), polyuria ( increased volume of urine due to the osmotic effect of glucose), polydipsia (excessivie thirst), polyphagia (excessive appetite). It is due to the hyposecretion of insulin or lack of insulin.
It is of two types:- Diabetes Type I and Diabetes Type II.
Diabetes Type I (Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, IDDM): It is cased due to deficient insulin production by pancreas because either beta cells of islets of Langerhans are not able to produce insulin or beta cells are absent.
Diabetes Type II (Insulin Independent or Non insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, NIDDM): It is an inherited recessive autosomal disorder appearing after the age of 40 years in which the cells fail to take up insulin from blood. It results in deficient passage of glucose form blood into the cell surfaces for storage or for direct consumption. It may occur due to defective insulin receptors over cell surfaces or abnormality on plasma protein amylin. The phenomenon is called insulin resistance. This type of diabetes mellitus accounts for 80-90% of all cases of diabetes.
It is kept under control by administration of insulin in case of insulin dependent diabetes. and hypoglycaemics in case of insulin independent diabetes. Sugar free diet is a pre requisite in both the cases.
Diabetes Insipidus (Drinker’s disease): Hypo secretion of ADH (Antidiuretic hormone or Vasopressin) causes a disorder known as diabetes insipidus (Excretion of large quantity of dilute urine). ADH is released into Continue reading

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Blurry Vision and Diabetes: What's the Connection?

Blurry Vision and Diabetes: What's the Connection?

Blurry vision is being unable to see the fine details.
Another way of describing it is seeing a lack of sharpness. Blurred eyesight is similar to seeing things as if they are in the out-of-focus parts of a photograph.
The blurriness can be subtle or obvious, can change through the day, and can come on slowly or quickly. It depends on the cause.
Diabetes can cause blurry vision for a variety of reasons. Both short-term and long-term complications can affect the vision of someone with diabetes.
Contents of this article:
How does diabetes affect the eyes?
Long-term uncontrolled diabetes can lead to high blood sugar levels that cause damage to small blood vessels over time. This damage can lead to problems with part of the eye called the retina which can create blurred vision.
Short-term blurriness in people with diabetes is due to a different cause. Fluid shifts into and out of the eye due to high blood sugar levels, causing the lens of the eye to swell.
This change in its shape causes blurriness as the lens is the part that focuses light onto the back of the eye. This short-term issue will resolve once blood sugar levels are lowered.
Can diabetes treatment cause blurriness?
Diabetes can also cause short-term blurriness if blood sugar levels fall too low (hypoglycemia). This can happen due to the timing of food or a change in activity levels in people who take medication that increases insulin in the body.
Rather than being caused by changes in the eye, blurriness from low blood sugars is caused by the effects of hypoglycemia on the brain. Vision affected in this way will retu Continue reading

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends.
Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team.
Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you
keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges
prevent or delay diabetes problems
feel good and have more energy
What foods can I eat if I have diabetes?
You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes.
The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines.
The food groups are
vegetables
nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes
starchy: includes potat Continue reading

How Does Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Does Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Diabetes, one of the most prevalent, uncontrolled and life threatening diseases, affects millions of Americans daily. It is important to know that diabetes, while it affects the entire body in different ways, has many signs and symptoms that appear in the legs and feet first. Good control of diabetes is the key to avoiding many of these risk factors associated with the disease.
One of the biggest and scariest risks of uncontrolled diabetes is amputation. There are many ways to control and overcome diabetes so that something as major as an amputation can be avoided.
Below are the three most important aspects of a diabetic foot examination. A thorough examination of these factors by your foot doctor can help prevent many minor and major foot problems.
Blood Flow
Uncontrolled diabetes affects blood flow in the legs and feet. It can cause blockages of small and large vessels leading to many different problems including pain, swelling and wounds that do not heal properly.
A very quick and simple test, where your physician simply feels the pulses of your foot and ankle, can provide a lot of important information. This test can tell whether a major artery is pumping, if it’s weak or not pumping at all- just by a simple touch. Other simple tests, if necessary, are also preformed with ultrasound and other diagnostic tools to look deeper into blood flow of the legs and feet.
Nerve Function
Peripheral neuropathy, or the abnormal function of nerves in the legs and feet, is also very common among diabetic patients. Due to the excess sugar in the body, the nerves start to act up. You c Continue reading

GPs need to tell people they can get rid of type 2 diabetes through weight loss – nutrition expert

GPs need to tell people they can get rid of type 2 diabetes through weight loss – nutrition expert

GPs need to tell people they can get rid of type 2 diabetes through weight loss – nutrition expert
September 14, 2017 8.54am EDT
Every working day, GPs in the UK diagnose almost 1,000 people with type 2 diabetes. It is one of the commonest and most expensive diseases. What most people don’t know is that with a bit of hard work, it is possible to become non-diabetic again.
Formerly limited to older people, type 2 diabetes is now common in younger, fatter, people in their 40s and 50s, and even younger ones who are severely obese. Some people are spared, but the epidemic of diabetes has closely followed the epidemic of overweight and obesity. The key is where the excess fat is stored: if it can no longer be stored under the skin, and starts to accumulate in the liver and pancreas, these organs malfunction to cause diabetes.
The conventional conversation with a GP used to go: “Your blood test confirms that you have diabetes.” And then, “Don’t worry, it’s mild diabetes and we can treat it with tablets.” That advice is horribly wrong.
Patients deserve a fuller, more honest explanation: “You are right to be concerned. Type 2 diabetes is a ghastly, progressively destructive disease. It leads to disabling painful complications, as the main cause of amputations, blindness and kidney failure, and contributes importantly to heart disease and dementia. Oh, and the tablets reduce your blood glucose but allow the disease to progress, so you will still die five to eight years younger.”
We now hope to add: “But if we can help you with an evidence-based programme to los Continue reading

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