diabetestalk.net

Diagnostic Accuracy Of Resting Systolic Toe Pressure For Diagnosis Of Peripheral Arterial Disease In People With And Without Diabetes: A Cross-sectional Retrospective Case-control Study

Diagnostic accuracy of resting systolic toe pressure for diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease in people with and without diabetes: a cross-sectional retrospective case-control study

Diagnostic accuracy of resting systolic toe pressure for diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease in people with and without diabetes: a cross-sectional retrospective case-control study

Abstract
The resting systolic toe pressure (TP) is a measure of small arterial function in the periphery. TP is used in addition to the ankle-brachial index when screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower limb in those with diabetes, particularly in the presence of lower limb medial arterial calcification. It may be used as an adjunct assessment of lower limb vascular function and as a predictor of wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of TP for detecting PAD in people with and without diabetes.
This was a retrospective case-control study. Two researchers extracted information from consecutive patient records, including TP measurements, colour Duplex ultrasound results, demographic information, and medical history. Measures of diagnostic accuracy were determined by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, and calculation of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios.
Three hundred and nintey-four participants with suspected PAD were included. In the diabetes group (n = 176), ROC analysis of TP for detecting PAD was 0.78 (95%CI: 0.69 to 0.84). In the control group (n = 218), the ROC of TP was 0.73 (95%CI: 0.70 to 0.80). TP had highest sensitivity when anatomical distribution of disease was both proximal and distal (diabetes group: 79.49%, the control group: 82.61%). TP yielded highest sensitivity in mild disease (50–75% stenosis) in diabetes group, (81.82%) and moderate disease (>75% stenosis) in control group (80.77%).
Our findings indicate that TPs are useful to assist in diagnosing PAD Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Best Breakfast Tips For Gestational Diabetics

Best Breakfast Tips For Gestational Diabetics

If you are detected with diabetes while being pregnant, this is known as gestational diabetics. It occurs in 7% of women. Gestational diabetes, if not treated in the early stage can lead to complications in the later date. Women with the controlled limit in blood sugar deliver healthy babies. When the carbohydrate restriction in blood does not burn calories, then it leads to diabetes. Glucose is considered as the primary source of energy for the body. Still, it is considered as the enemy of diabetes.
What are the foods that should be avoided during the gestational period?
If you have gestational diabetes, then you should avoid some foods like- milk, yogurt, fruits, juices, rice, grains, cereals, pasta, bread, tortillas, bagels, rolls, split beans, dried beans, lentils, corn, yams, potatoes, winter squash, and peas.
What are the primary dietary considerations while opting for a diet in gestational period?
Your physician will prescribe you certain food and calculate some carbohydrates you need at meals. There are some facts which you need to keep in mind while opting for a healthy diet.
Divide your day and your meals accordingly into three main and two snacks.
The carbohydrate intake of your lunch should be reasonably small.
Drink one cup of milk a day and restrict the amount.
Limit the portion of fruit you eat.
Mind your breakfast menu and eat accordingly.
Limit the intake of sweets and desert.
Use artificial sweetener instead of natural sugar.
Some useful breakfast ideas for gestational diabetics
In case you have gestational diabetes, then you have to stress a lot of the in Continue reading

New alginate skin patch for type 2 diabetes

New alginate skin patch for type 2 diabetes


Home / Innovations / New alginate skin patch for type 2 diabetes
New alginate skin patch for type 2 diabetes
Concept illustration of microneedle device for type 2 diabetes treatment. Chen lab, NIBIB.
or millions of people with type 2 diabetes, ongoing vigilance over the amount of sugar, or glucose, in their blood is the key to health. A finger prick before mealtimes and maybe an insulin injection is an uncomfortable but necessary routine.
Researchers with NIHs National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have devised an innovative biochemical formula of mineralized compounds that interacts in the bloodstream to regulate blood sugar for days at a time. In a proof-of-concept study performed with mice, the researchers showed that the biochemically formulated patch of dissolvable microneedles can respond to blood chemistry to manage glucose automatically.
This experimental approach could be a way to take advantage of the fact that persons with type 2 diabetes can still produce some insulin, said Richard Leapman, Ph.D., NIBIB scientific director. A weekly microneedle patch application would also be less complicated and painful than routines that require frequent blood testing.
Global incidence of all types of diabetes is about 285 million people, of which 90 percent have type 2 diabetes. Many require insulin therapy thatis usually given by injection just under the skin in amounts that are calculated according to the deficit in naturally generated insulin in the blood. Insulin therapy is not managed well in half of all cases.
NIBIB researchers led Continue reading

Recommendations for management of diabetes during Ramadan: update 2015

Recommendations for management of diabetes during Ramadan: update 2015


Recommendations for management of diabetes during Ramadan: update 2015
1EDC, Center for Diabetes Education, McDonough, Georgia, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Mansura University, Mansura, Egypt
4Department of Internal Medicine, Unit of Diabetes & Metabolism, Alexandria Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria, Egypt
5Dammam Medical Complex, Dammam, Saudi Arabia
6Eastern Mediterranean Office of the World Health Organization, Cairo, Egypt
7Florence Nightingale Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
8Division of Endocrinology, University of IL, Chicago, Illinois, USA
9Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Campus Bio Medico, Rome, Italy
10Diabetic Association of Pakistan, Karachi, Pakistan
12Saudi Diabetes Group, King Abdul Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
13National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland
14Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
15Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Correspondence to Dr Mahmoud Ibrahim; [email protected]
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
Received 2015 Apr 5; Revised 2015 Jun 2; Accepted 2015 Jun 3.
Copyright Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions
This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to dist Continue reading

A Guide to HGH (Growth Hormone) and Diabetes in 2017

A Guide to HGH (Growth Hormone) and Diabetes in 2017


Certainly, you have heard of diabetes, and its no wonder. The numbers of those Americans afflicted with the condition have been rising dramatically in recent years. According to the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI), in the past decade alone, the cases of people living with diabetes jumped more than 40 percent to almost 26 million Americans.Worldwide the numbers are just as chilling. DRI estimates there are 382 million people globally, living with diabetes, and the World Health Organization believes that number will be more than double by 2030.
Did you know that diabetes claims more lives than AIDS and breast cancer combined taking the life of 1 American every 3 minutes?
But what exactly is diabetes? Diabetes, technically called diabetes mellitus by medical professionals, is not a single condition. It is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels (high blood sugar) because the person with the condition is not producing enough insulin, or because the cells of his or her body do not respond correctly to the presence of insulin or both.
To understand diabetes you must understand the very important hormone, insulin, and its role in metabolizing or processing the food that you eat. In order to work, the cells of your body require sugar, or glucose, for energy. During digestion, when the sugars are released from the food, this triggers your pancreas to release insulin. Insulin is what knocks on the doors of your cells and tells them to open up and let the glucose in. But in a person with diabetes, that either doesnt happen or the cells cant re Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles