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Diabetes, Weight Can Combine To Alter Brain, Study Says

Diabetes, weight can combine to alter brain, study says

Diabetes, weight can combine to alter brain, study says

(CNN)It's well-known that type 2 diabetes can cause medical complications in certain organs, including the brain. But overweight and obese people with early-stage type 2 diabetes have more severe abnormalities in brain structure and cognition than normal-weight people with type 2 diabetes, according to a new study in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.
Having type 2 diabetes and being overweight, then, can combine to have a greater effect on brain structures.
"There's a general agreement that type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for various types of both structural and functional abnormalities in the brain," said Dr. Donald C. Simonson, a co-author of the study and an endocrinologist specializing in diabetes. "Simple obesity also shows the same type of abnormalities ... in a milder stage. You can see where it's not quite exactly normal but not quite as bad as someone with diabetes.
"So, if you have both, will it be worse than if you have them alone? That's what we looked at in this particular study," said Simonson, who teaches at Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
Dr. In Kyoon Lyoo, lead author and a professor at the Ewha Brain Institute at Ewha Womens University in Seoul, South Korea, wrote in an email, "As obesity has been known to be associated with metabolic dysfunction, inflammation, and brain changes independently of diabetes, we expected that brain alterations might be more pronounced in overweight/obese participants with type 2 diabetes."
Lyoo, Simonson and their colleagues designed a study around 50 overweight or o Continue reading

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Honey and Cinnamon for Diabetes Treatment

Honey and Cinnamon for Diabetes Treatment

In the past several years, honey and cinnamon have become stars in the realm of complementary medicine. Both are rumored to cure or at least help manage all sorts of ailments, including diabetes. While both honey and cinnamon have properties that may benefit health, their usefulness in controlling diabetes is debatable. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), available evidence does not support the use of cinnamon or honey as a means to improve blood glucose levels. More human research is needed to understand if these items have a future role in diabetes management.
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Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes elevated blood glucose levels, so it may seem counter-intuitive to link this carbohydrate-rich food to improved diabetes control. However, there is some preliminary research that suggests honey could improve blood glucose levels. When diabetic rats were given both honey and one of two diabetes drugs -- metformin or glibenclamide -- their blood glucose levels improved more than those given only the medication, according to a study published in the March 2011 "International Journal of Biological Sciences." The authors postulate that honey's high fructose content -- a simple sugar that has a neutral effect on blood glucose -- may be one of the reasons for the noted benefits. Of interest, it's unknown if humans eating honey from the United States would have a glucose-lowering benefit, as this rat study used tualang or wild rain forest honey, which has a higher fructose content compared to U.S honey.
Honey and Human Research
For humans with Continue reading

Type 1 diabetes treatment could end need for insulin shots

Type 1 diabetes treatment could end need for insulin shots

Insulin shots could become a thing of the past for type 1 diabetes patients thanks to a technology being developed by Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult, a London-based not-for-profit organisation, and Aberdeen University.
The pre-clinical results have encouraged CGT and Aberdeen University to create a spin-out company, called Islexa. It will manufacture lab-grown islets, the organoids responsible for insulin production, by reprogramming donated pancreatic tissue.
Only 30-50 people with type 1 diabetes in the UK currently receive an islet transplant each year, owing to a lack of donors and the difficulty of extracting islets from pancreatic tissue.
Growing islets will “significantly increase the number of patients who can receive the treatment,” Keith Thompson, CGT’s chief executive, told the World Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine congress in London on Wednesday. He will run Islexa with Michael Bennet from CGT and Anne Lewendon from Aberdeen University.
If clinical trials are successful, the technology means tens of thousands more people could live without the need for frequent insulin injections, although it will take a few years until the treatment is available.
About 320,000 people in Britain have type 1 diabetes, a number set to more than double to 652,000 by 2035. Around the world, 21 million people have type 1 diabetes.
It is a lifelong condition that occurs when the pancreas does not produce any insulin, while type 2 diabetes – far more common, especially as obesity rises around the world – is a condition where the pancreas does not produce enough insulin o Continue reading

'Giant leap' to type 1 diabetes cure

'Giant leap' to type 1 diabetes cure

The hunt for a cure for type 1 diabetes has recently taken a "tremendous step forward", scientists have said.
The disease is caused by the immune system destroying the cells that control blood sugar levels.
A team at Harvard University used stem cells to produce hundreds of millions of the cells in the laboratory.
Tests on mice showed the cells could treat the disease, which experts described as "potentially a major medical breakthrough".
Beta cells in the pancreas pump out insulin to bring down blood sugar levels.
But the body's own immune system can turn against the beta cells, destroying them and leaving people with a potentially fatal disease because they cannot regulate their blood sugar levels.
It is different to the far more common type 2 diabetes which is largely due to an unhealthy lifestyle.
Perfect cocktail
The team at Harvard was led by Prof Doug Melton who began the search for a cure when his son was diagnosed 23 years ago. He then had a daughter who also developed type 1.
He is attempting to replace the approximately 150 million missing beta cells, using stem cell technology.
He found the perfect cocktail of chemicals to transform embryonic stem cells into functioning beta cells.
Tests on mice with type 1 diabetes, published in the journal Cell, showed that the lab-made cells could produce insulin and control blood sugar levels for several months.
Dr Melton said: "It was gratifying to know that we could do something that we always thought was possible.
"We are now just one pre-clinical step away from the finish line."
However, his children were not quite so im Continue reading

How To Use Manuka Honey To Fight Inflammation, Diabetes And Cancer

How To Use Manuka Honey To Fight Inflammation, Diabetes And Cancer

Honey is one of nature’s greatest gifts. As well as being a nutritious and delicious food, the golden syrup has incredible medicinal benefits.
In fact, honey has a unique set of antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, antiseptic, digestive and antioxidant properties.
Not all honeys are the same. One of the most medicinal honeys available is Manuka Honey, which is currently the only medical-grade honey on the market.
What Is Manuka Honey?
Manuka honey comes from nectar collected by honeybees foraging on the manuka tree, which grows in New Zealand. It was traditionally used by the Maori people to treat wounds and burns.
To be considered potent enough to be therapeutic, manuka honey needs a minimum rating of 10 UMF (unique manuka factor). Honey at or above that level is marketed as “UMF Manuka Honey” or “Active Manuka Honey” (1).
Manuka Honey Is Well-Known For THIS…
Manuka honey is often used by doctors to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
“The unique [antibiotic] properties of honey lie in its ability to fight infection on multiple levels, making it more difficult for bacteria to develop resistance,” says Susan M. Meschwitz, Ph.D.
That is, it uses a combination of weapons, including hydrogen peroxide, acidity, osmotic effect, high sugar concentration and polyphenols — all of which actively kill bacterial cells, she explains.
The osmotic effect, which is the result of the high sugar concentration in honey, draws water from the bacterial cells, dehydrating and killing them. It may also interfere with Quorum sensing, the way by which bacteri Continue reading

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