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Diabetes Self-Management Education And Support (DSMES)

Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES)

Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES)


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Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES)
Once the patient is educated, they should be allowed to take charge of their care.
DSMES is an important tool that helps in averting diabetes complications. With an excess of 79 million Americans being diagnosed with prediabetes or at an increased risk of developing diabetes, DSMES incorporates lifestyle changes designed for individuals with prediabetes to delay and even prevent progression to diabetes status. Participants are the ones who do the most in the daily management of their condition and the educators primary role should be to make the patients work easier.
DSMES are designed in reference to the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and support. Diabetes educators apply the DSMES standards as teaching tools for evidence-based education of diabetes patients. No single approach is identified as a solution to all problems as each patient is unique and should be treated according to their specific needs. The 10 DSMES program standards as outlined in the ADA guideline include;
All providers are expected to have an organizational structure with a mission statement and goals. DSME should be used and applied by the organization in providing diabetes care to its patients
The community and other individuals with vested interest in the DSME program such as health care professionals, and people with diabetes should be involved in order to boost its quality. This will make it more effective, useful in different Continue reading

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UCSF and Partners in Mexico Study Treatment to Prevent Diabetes

UCSF and Partners in Mexico Study Treatment to Prevent Diabetes

A medication shown to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes could make a big difference in Mexico, California, and globally through a partnership involving UCSF Institute for Global Health Sciences (IGHS) and the Center for Vulnerable Populations.
Drs. Jaime Sepulveda, IGHS executive director, and Dean Schillinger, UCSF School of Medicine diabetes expert and primary care physician, are leading the UCSF side of a partnership with Mexican health officials. The team is running a large-scale trial of metformin, a low-cost and safe diabetes medication derived from the French Lilac, in Mexico City’s health system that serves low-income patients.
“This is truly an unprecedented opportunity,” Schillinger said. “To be able to do this kind of practice-based research in the real world is exceedingly rare and will shed light onto a major global health problem.”
The partnership came about through Sepulveda’s work as co-chair of the UC-Mexico Initiative Health Working Group. The initiative was created by UC President Janet Napolitano in 2014 to encourage partnerships between the University of California and Mexico in areas of joint interest and benefit.
Diabetes has taken an increasingly large toll in Mexico in the past few decades, especially among populations of lower socioeconomic status. From 1994 to 2006, the prevalence of diabetes in Mexico doubled, according to a 2013 paper published in Globalization and Health. Diabetes is the leading cause of death and disability combined in Mexico, according to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Continue reading

Watch Out For False Advertising About Diabetes Cures

Watch Out For False Advertising About Diabetes Cures

One of my friends asked me to comment on a website claiming that insulin sensitivity can be significantly improved in only 4 days, based on an experiment with 7 diabetics.
In a controlled environment, 7 diabetic participants attended a 4-day “retreat” where they consumed a low-fat plant-based diet. In the group, 6 were Type 1 diabetics and only 1 was a Type 2 diabetic. At the end of the 4 days, all participants saw dramatic improvements in blood glucose levels and were able to lower their insulin usage. The study director claimed that the improvement was because the diet increased their “insulin sensitivity,” implying that their cells had lost their supposed insulin resistance in spite of eating more carbohydrate.
I admire these participants for achieving the results they obtained, but I am concerned about the scientific explanation of the findings. How can the director know that insulin sensitivity increased without showing that insulin resistance is actually the cause of their diabetes? And since many of the participants are Type 1 diabetics, how do their results impact Type 2 diabetics, if at all?
There are questions about this experiment that should give you pause before believing it.
First, the fact that nearly every single one of the participants were Type 1 diabetics completely negates the conclusions for this experiment as they relate to people with Type 2 diabetes. No diabetes expert has ever claimed that people with Type 1 diabetes have lower insulin sensitivity. Type 1 diabetes is the result of lack of insulin production, not reduced sensitivity of cells Continue reading

The treatment that reversed type 2 diabetes

The treatment that reversed type 2 diabetes


Easy Health Options Home Health Conditions Diabetes The treatment that reversed type 2 diabetes
The treatment that reversed type 2 diabetes
For the millions of patients who continue to go to their doctor for routine type 2 diabetes medications and care, this information is an eye opener
A new study published in the Lancet reveals that 86 percent of patients were able to completely eliminate all medications and remain diabetes-free just by doing one thing
In mainstream medicine, the entire focus of type 2 diabetes is disease management through medication.
Yes, there is sometimes mention of healthy diet and exercise, but thats about it it seldom goes much further than a brief discussion.
There are no education courses, coaching, or even detailed instructions provided for weight loss in the doctor office. The focus is clearly on which medication to take, how much to take and when.
That all needs to change because the study in the Lancet reveals that, most diabetics, technically, can reverse diabetes without medications.
In fact, in this study, the diabetic patients who took standard diabetes prescription medications fared worse (as far as diabetes control and quality of life) compared to those who safely got off their medications because they lost weight.
Ill share some interesting points regarding this study in a moment But first, have you ever heard of Gabriel Cousens, M.D.? If not, please watch this 5 minute YouTube documentary Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days Trailer. He proves that diabetes can effectively be reversed in just 30 days by adhering to Continue reading

Lack of sleep nearly triples risk of gestational diabetes | Daily Mail Online

Lack of sleep nearly triples risk of gestational diabetes | Daily Mail Online


Family of five from Oregon killed after their car plunges off a cliff along Pacific Coast Highway
Pregnant women who got less than 6.25 hours of sleep were 70 percent more likely to develop gestational diabetes than others, a new study shows
The pregnancy-related form of diabetes usually subsides after the mother delivers, but puts her at about seven times greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life
Gestational diabetes also increases the odds that the baby will be larger than average, which can complicate delivery
It is also a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and obesity later in the baby's life
Pregnant women who got less than 6.25 hours of sleep each night were 70 percent more likely to develop gestational diabetes than others, according to a new meta-analysis of two sets of studies.
Thepregnancy-related form of diabetes is marked by elevated blood sugar levels.
It can lead to higher birth weights and can put both mother and baby at higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes and obesity later in life.
The University of Illinois at Chicago study adds to a body of research linking insufficient sleep - which is more common among women, than men, and especially common in pregnant women - to other complications like postpartum depression .
Pregnant women may need slightly more sleep than the seven hours recommended for adults. A new study links not getting enough sleep to an increased chance of gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes is common among pregnant women, but rarely comes with any symptoms besides high blood sugar, only detectable with a blood Continue reading

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