diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Results That Can Make A Difference

Diabetes Results That Can Make a Difference

Diabetes Results That Can Make a Difference

Diabetes runs in my family. Three of my four grandparents had type 2 diabetes, which is where your body doesn’t use insulin properly, and your blood sugar levels get too high. I also have an uncle with type 1, where your body doesn’t make insulin at all.
I knew I had multiple risk factors for type 2 diabetes. I had gestational diabetes when I was pregnant with both my boys. My body mass index is high; I’ve tried to lose weight but haven’t been as successful as I’d like. In my early 40s, I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.
I knew a lot about the condition I had developed because at that time, my work was around diabetes control and prevention in North Carolina. In the past few years, my role has expanded to include heart disease. I have served as a staff liaison to the statewide Diabetes Advisory Council, a coalition of diabetes stakeholders, for many years. A couple of years ago, a researcher from the University of North Carolina told the council about a study on finger sticks they were planning. I joined the PCORI-funded study as a stakeholder who had a personal interest in the topic and could talk about the results of the study with our council to share the results statewide.
Avoiding Finger Sticks
The results are important. Our study found that the finger sticks people like me use to check our blood sugar levels don’t help much if we have type 2 diabetes and aren’t using insulin.
Why is this important? Testing supplies are expensive, and the process is painful—you’re sticking yourself and you’re bleeding! Now we know that people like me can manage j Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
A Type 1 Diabetes Pill? Newest Sotagliflozin Trial Results

A Type 1 Diabetes Pill? Newest Sotagliflozin Trial Results

Research reveals improved A1c and weight loss benefits for people with type 1 diabetes on sotagliflozin, but a slightly increased risk of DKA
The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) 77th Scientific Session in June convened key leaders in diabetes research to share findings on the latest drug developments. At the conference, Lexicon Pharmaceuticals presented full results from three major trials looking at the safety and effectiveness of sotagliflozin, a new kind of type 1 diabetes therapy (a pill!) currently undergoing clinical trials that is taken in addition to insulin.
Two studies Lexicon presented at ADA (called inTandem1 and inTandem2) investigated how different doses of sotagliflozin affect measures such as A1c and weight. Trial participants either got 400 mg of sotagliflozin, 200 mg of sotagliflozin, or placebo (a “nothing” pill). A third study not presented at ADA (called inTandem3) compared 400 mg of sotagliflozin to placebo.
Results from inTandem1 found a significantly greater proportion of people taking sotagliflozin benefitted from the new therapy – defined as reducing A1c to less than 7% with no instances of severe hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) or diabetic ketoacidosis (known as DKA – read more about it here). Specifically:
44% of people taking 400 mg sotagliflozin benefitted, compared to 34% of those taking 200 mg of sotagliflozin and only 22% in the placebo group.
People taking 400 mg of sotagliflozin (the highest dose) lost an average of 6 pounds over 6 months, versus 3.5 pounds lost in those taking 200 mg of sotagliflozin and 1.8 pounds gained i Continue reading

Curcumin Extract for Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes

Curcumin Extract for Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract
OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of curcumin in delaying development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the prediabetic population.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This randomized, double-blinded, placebo- controlled trial included subjects (n = 240) with criteria of prediabetes. All subjects were randomly assigned to receive either curcumin or placebo capsules for 9 months. To assess the T2DM progression after curcumin treatments and to determine the number of subjects progressing to T2DM, changes in β-cell functions (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]-β, C-peptide, and proinsulin/insulin), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), anti-inflammatory cytokine (adiponectin), and other parameters were monitored at the baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 9-month visits during the course of intervention.
RESULTS After 9 months of treatment, 16.4% of subjects in the placebo group were diagnosed with T2DM, whereas none were diagnosed with T2DM in the curcumin-treated group. In addition, the curcumin-treated group showed a better overall function of β-cells, with higher HOMA-β (61.58 vs. 48.72; P < 0.01) and lower C-peptide (1.7 vs. 2.17; P < 0.05). The curcumin-treated group showed a lower level of HOMA-IR (3.22 vs. 4.04; P < 0.001) and higher adiponectin (22.46 vs. 18.45; P < 0.05) when compared with the placebo group.
CONCLUSIONS A 9-month curcumin intervention in a prediabetic population significantly lowered the number of prediabetic individuals who eventually developed T2DM. In addition, the curcumin treatment appeared to improve overall function of β-cells, with very minor advers Continue reading

Prepping With Type 1 Diabetes

Prepping With Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes — also called Juvenile Diabetes — shook our prepping plans to their foundations. While I was stockpiling food, learning to make cheese, and writing the occasional post for the Survival Mom, my 9 year-old daughter’s body was attacking itself and she was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes.
Just a short time later I found myself trying to find answers for prepping with Type 1 Diabetes.
A T1D diagnosis is a life sentence of finger pokes and insulin administration. And because it’s genetic, we now know our other children are at risk.
What’s a survival mom to do? I didn’t even wait for the shock to wear off before I took to the internet seeking advice from the preparedness community…and was extremely disappointed with the meager information available. (I’ve included the links to those I found even a little bit helpful to save you time.) Even expert Mormon preppers who have so much information and resources had little to offer.
NOTE: This post is specific to Type 1 Diabetes, NOT Type 2. Please keep the differences in mind when you post comments and suggestions. Finding ways to prepare for a serious disease like this is scary. Suggestions that simple adjustments, like changing the food we have stored, as if we wouldn’t have already done that if it would resolve the issue, are more hurtful than helpful.
*Disclaimer: I am not a doctor, attorney, engineer, moralist, spiritual adviser, survivalist, or millionaire. Use the attached links and their information at your own risk. I’ve simply put together what’s on the net and what I’ve personally experie Continue reading

Are Microbiome Changes a Cause or Symptom of Type 1 Diabetes?

Are Microbiome Changes a Cause or Symptom of Type 1 Diabetes?

Two years ago, I interviewed Alex Kostic, who was then a postdoctoral fellow at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard exploring the microbiome’s connection to type 1 diabetes. His work studying children in Finland and parts of neighboring Russia showed that the microbiomes of children with type 1 diabetes were drastically different from the microbiomes of those without the disease. Now Kostic is running his own lab at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, and investigating questions such as whether or not the changes in the microbiome are causing disease or are merely a symptom of it. He is also looking at the microbiota of the Joslin medalists—those who have lived with type 1 diabetes for more than fifty years. About 20-30 percent of those medalists still produce a trace amount of insulin, and Kostic is trying to understand whether that insulin production can be explained by differences in those medalists’ microbiomes.
Jessica Dunne, director of discovery research at JDRF, which is funding Kostic’s study of the medalists commented on the new lens that Kostic is bringing to the study of T1D. “We’re often thinking about how the microbiome is affecting the immune system. He took a different tack that we haven’t seen anyone take: what’s the role of the microbiome on beta cells? To me, it’s a completely novel approach; it’s very out of the box thinking in terms of how the microbiome can affect residual insulin production in type 1.” The question is, she continued, “can we reawaken those sleeping beta cells by modifying the microbiome?” Dr. George King Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles