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Diabetes Rates Rise Among US Youth, Especially Minorities

Diabetes Rates Rise Among US Youth, Especially Minorities

Diabetes Rates Rise Among US Youth, Especially Minorities

The gap in disease incidence among ethnic groups demands a policy response, say experts who weighed in on the SEARCH data.
Results from the first decade a major study by the CDC and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) show diabetes incidence is rising rapidly among US youth, but especially among racial and ethnic minorities.
The findings from the Search for Diabetes in Youth Study (SEARCH), which began in 2000 and will continue until at least 2020,1 were published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) in mid-April,2 and were consistent with a claims study reported by FAIR Health earlier this year.
The study is the first to analyze trends in new cases of both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) among US youth younger than age 20 across 5 ethnic groups: non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans.
While the findings were not quite a surprise, the gap in disease incidence among ethnic groups, and the trends in the Hispanic population in particular, demand policy responses and increased levels of research, according to several experts who contacted Evidence-Based Diabetes Management™ (EBDM™).
The current findings report data from 2002-2003 to 2011-2012, and found the unadjusted incidence of T1D cases rose significantly by about 1.4% per year, but rates varied by demographic characteristics. For instance, new cases increased much more among boys than girls. After adjusting for age, sex, and race or ethnic group, the researchers found a 1.8% relative annual increase in T1D incidence. They Continue reading

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Controlled Diet for Dog Diabetes

Controlled Diet for Dog Diabetes

Dog diabetes usually surfaces between ages 7 and 9 and one out of every 10 dogs will suffer from diabetes. It is known that female dogs are more susceptible to diabetes than males because of changes in their hormones. The most common type of diabetes in dogs is diabetes Mellitus.
Insulin is produced in the pancreas and helps to control the level of glucose in the blood. When your dog has diabetes, there is not enough natural insulin produced to slow the glucose production to the bloodstream.
If the level of glucose in the blood gets too high (hyperglycemia), it can reach the kidneys and cause frequent urination. Because your dog is urinating so much, he is likely drinking a lot. It is an annoying cycle that needs to be caught right away.
There is no cure for dog diabetes but it can be managed. If diabetes is left untreated it can lead to serious illness and even death.
Symptoms of diabetes in dogs need to be caught early on to help prevent serious side effects and provide relief for your dog. Remember that your dog cannot tell you what is wrong with him. It is up to you to watch out for abnormal behavior in your dog. Diabetes is very common in dogs, and if it is not treated properly it can lead to coma, paralysis and even death.
There are three different forms of dog diabetes: diabetes Mellitus, diabetes Insipidus and Gestational Diabetes. The most common of the three is diabetes Mellitus, often referred to as the sugar diabetes.
All three forms of diabetes display similar symptoms — with the most common symptoms listed below.
Urinating Noticeably More than Usual
If your Continue reading

Monitoring Blood Glucose Level: How It Can Help You to Manage Diabetes?

Monitoring Blood Glucose Level: How It Can Help You to Manage Diabetes?

Diabetes is a very complicated disease and the main cause that contributes to most of the complications include the increased levels of blood glucose in the patient’s body. As a result, blood sugar monitoring forms a very and perhaps the most important part of diabetes care. In this article, we shall explore more about the importance of blood glucose monitoring in diabetes. So, come and join in for the article “Monitoring Blood Glucose Level: How it Can Help You to Manage Diabetes?”
Why Should You Monitor Your Blood Glucose Levels?
As we know, diabetes is known to elevate the levels of glucose in the blood which gives rise to several unwanted complications. Hence, blood sugar monitoring is an important way of dealing with the same:
Blood sugar monitoring forms the most important part of managing diabetes. When you manage it, you are in a better position to deal and even avoid the complications that are associated with diabetes.
Eating a proper and balanced meal, regular physical exercise all form a very important part of diabetes management. However, not everything affects the different individuals in a similar fashion. Thus, in order to understand how a particular food or a particular form of exercise is affecting you, it is important to monitor blood glucose levels
When you monitor blood glucose regularly, you will be in a better position to detect when you are more susceptible to getting affected by either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. You can thereby take the necessary steps and avoid all unwanted complications
Similarly, when you are monitoring the glucose, you Continue reading

Diabetes Incontinence: What You Should Know

Diabetes Incontinence: What You Should Know

Oftentimes, having one condition can increase your risk for other issues. This is true for diabetes and incontinence, or the accidental release of urine or fecal matter. Incontinence can also be a symptom of an overactive bladder (OAB), which is the sudden urge to urinate.
One Norwegian study found that incontinence affected 39 percent of women with diabetes and 26 percent of women without diabetes. Another review suggested that type 2 diabetes may affect incontinence, but more research is needed. In general, lots of people deal with various types of incontinence and levels of severity. The common types include:
stress, leakage is due to pressure on the bladder
urge, uncontrolled leakage due to a need to void
overflow, leakage due to full bladder
functional, nerve, or muscle damage causes leakage
transient incontinence, a temporary side effect from a condition or medication
Read on to learn how diabetes contributes to incontinence and what you can to do manage the condition.
The exact link between diabetes and incontinence is unknown. The four possible ways that diabetes can contribute to incontinence are:
obesity puts pressure on your bladder
nerve damage affects the nerves that control the bowel and the bladder
a compromised immune system increases the risk for urinary tract infections (UTIs), which can cause incontinence
diabetes medication may cause diarrhea
Also, high blood sugar levels seen with diabetes can cause you to become thirstier and urinate more. The excess sugar in your blood triggers thirst, which then leads to more frequent urination.
Other factors that ma Continue reading

Reversing Diabetes 101: The Truth About Carbs, Blood Sugar and Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Reversing Diabetes 101: The Truth About Carbs, Blood Sugar and Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

You may have heard a lot about type 2 diabetes – but do you know what it actually does to your body?
In this video series, we’ll explore the causes of type 2 diabetes and how to reverse it.
How does food affect the blood sugar?
1: How does food affect blood sugar?
What happens when we eat carbohydrates, protein and fat?
Your blood sugar responds very differently to different macronutrients. Fat does not impact blood sugar levels. Carbs have a high impact, protein impacts them moderately, but fat? No impact!
Carbs and fats provide energy for the body. When carbs are limited in the diet, fat becomes the preferred and efficient fuel source. When you reduce your intake of one macronutrient, you have to increase your intake of at least one other macronutrient—otherwise you’ll feel hungry and not have enough energy. The low-fat craze started with flawed science that incorrectly stated that fat was dangerous. In a low carb, high-fat diet, fat provides you with the energy your body needs, and also helps knock out hunger and cravings.
2: Carbohydrate intolerance and insulin resistance
Type 2 diabetes is a disease of high blood sugar. It can also be thought of as carbohydrate intolerance or insulin resistance. That means when someone with type 2 diabetes eats carbohydrates, it causes their blood sugar to rise above what is healthy.
Everyone has a different carbohydrate tolerance. One person may be able to eat a carb-heavy diet with no problem, and another may get blood sugar spikes and gain weight from eating very few carbohydrates. Both people can be healthy, as long as they Continue reading

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