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Diabetes Mellitus Expanded Evaluation [Hot Topic]

Diabetes Mellitus Expanded Evaluation [Hot Topic]

Diabetes Mellitus Expanded Evaluation [Hot Topic]


Diabetes Mellitus Expanded Evaluation [Hot Topic]
Andrew McKeon M.D. is Co-Director of the Neuroimmunology Laboratory, Professor of Neurology, and an Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota
Hi, Im Matt Binnicker, the Director of Clinical Virology and Vice Chair of Practice in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic. Did you know that more than 29 million Americans live with diabetes, and it remains one of the leading causes of death in the United States? Well, because of the significance of this disease, its important that we identify patients as early as possible, and in this months Hot Topic, my colleague, Dr. Andrew McKeon, will provide you with valuable information regarding the utility of antibody testing for the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. I hope you enjoy this months Hot Topic, and I want to personally thank you for allowing Mayo Medical Laboratories the opportunity to be a partner in your patients healthcare.
In this Hot Topic presentation, I am going to discuss the diabetes mellitus evaluation in serum, which has been updated to include the Zinc Transporter 8 Antibody (ZnT8 Ab).
My name is Dr. Andrew McKeon. I am a Co-Director of the Neuroimmunology Lab and Professor of Neurology, Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Although we are primarily a neuroimmunology lab, we also have a long-standing commitment to serological diagnoses in type 1 diabetes.
The objective of this presentation is to describe the utility of ant Continue reading

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5 Steps for Managing Diabetes on Campus

5 Steps for Managing Diabetes on Campus


Tips for making college a safe and healthy home away from home
Well before you get to college, find a diabetes care team near campus. Your current pediatrician or endocrinologist may know of nearby doctors, nurses, and diabetes educators. Or reach out to your local American Diabetes Association office for referrals, says Paul Madden, MEd, the Associations director of type1 and type2 diabetes programs.
Plan to get to know the folks at your campus health centerand make sure they get to know you, Madden says. Students, not their parents, should call ahead of their move to introduce themselves as someone with diabetes. Then, within a couple days of school starting, visit the health center and share information about your diabetes, such as medication and insulin dosages, and perhaps bring backup insulin vials or pens to store there. This serves two purposes, Madden says: If you run low on insulin in your dorm room, it may be easier to walk to the health center than get to a pharmacy. It also makes you a familiar face with your care team on campus.
The people you live withroommates, resident advisers, and resident directorsshould know you have diabetes, says Christina Roth, CEO and founder of the College Diabetes Network, an online and in-person network of college students and alumni with diabetes.
Its wise to teach your roommates to administer glucagon in an emergency. Alternatively, Madden suggests telling them, If I cant safely drink something sweetnot alcohol!please call the health center or 911. Help them understand (and remember) by printing and distributing diabetes Continue reading

New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes

New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes


New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes
New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes
The ViaCyte trial is being run at three sites in North America, including University of Minnesota Health.
Greg Romero (right) has to live with his type 1 diabetes all day, every day. But a new clinical trial offered through University of Minnesota Health could give him a functional cure for his disease.
Greg Romero cant run or hide from his type 1 diabetes .
Its the main priority I have, taking care of this disease, he said. Every minute of every day.
Romero has been diabetic since he was 11 years old, but in the past several years his disease has become more complicated. Hes developed hypoglycemia unawareness, which means hes not able to feel when his blood glucose drops to dangerously low levels. Even with new technology that routinely provides him insulin and monitors his blood glucose levels, managing his disease is an ever-present responsibility.
Now, theres a sign of hope. Romero is one of a handful of people in the world participating in a new clinical trial thats studying whether pancreatic progenitor cells, transplanted into a person with type 1 diabetes, can become cells that produce insulin naturallyeffectively curing the disease. Developed by ViaCyte, the trial is available at three sites in North America, including University of Minnesota Health.
Learn more about University of Minnesota Health diabetes care.
These pancreatic progenitor cells are a renewable resource. A single progenitor cell Continue reading

Genetic Association of Waist-to-Hip Ratio With Cardiometabolic Traits, Type 2 Diabetes, and Coronary Heart Disease

Genetic Association of Waist-to-Hip Ratio With Cardiometabolic Traits, Type 2 Diabetes, and Coronary Heart Disease


Assumptions of a Mendelian Randomization Analysis
Genetic variants, which are assigned at birth and largely randomly assorted in a population, can be used as instrumental variables to estimate the causal association of an exposure (eg, waist-to-hip ratio [WHR] adjusted for body mass index [BMI]) with an outcome of interest (eg, coronary heart disease). This approach rests on 3 assumptions. First, the genetic variants must be associated with the exposure (assumption 1). Second, the genetic variants must not be associated with confounders (assumption 2). Third, the genetic variants must influence risk of the outcome through the exposure and not through other pathways (assumption 3). Mendelian randomization can be extended to estimate the association of exposure with outcome that is mediated by a given a mediator (eg, triglycerides).
A polygenic score of 48 single-nucleotide polymorphisms was used as an instrument to estimate the causal association of waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) adjusted for body mass index (BMI) with cardiometabolic quantitative traits, type 2 diabetes, and coronary heart disease; sources of data for analysis included the UK Biobank and publicly available genome-wide association studies. CARDIOGRAMplusC4D indicates Coronary Artery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis plus the Coronary Artery Disease Genetics Consortium 11 ; CKDGen, Chronic Kidney Disease Genetics Consortium 12 ; DIAGRAM, Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis 13 ; GIANT, Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits 14 , 15 ; GLGC, Global Lipids Genetics Consortium 16 Continue reading

Diabetes: How to spot the signs before it’s too late

Diabetes: How to spot the signs before it’s too late

Sometimes the hustle and bustle of life distract us so much that we can’t see the signs our bodies give us about the condition of our health, especially with diseases like diabetes at an all-time high in this country. I know this to be true because there have been times that I’ve worn myself down by ignoring what my body was trying to tell me and I’d become sick for weeks at a time. In the midst of getting things done and being a “boss” too many people let their health decline; sometimes to the point of no return.
I have been dealing with a diabetic mother for a long time now. There are good days and not so good days. I can gauge the seriousness of her condition daily based on the signs, but it was not always like that. When she was first diagnosed with the autoimmune disease (type 2 diabetes) about 12 years ago, there were a lot of scary trips to the hospital and a lot of days not knowing what to expect next. Take it from me that it’s true you become a kind of “expert” about a disease when faced with it personally. That’s why knowing what to look for is so important. It can literally be the difference between life and death.
So here are some tips on knowing the signs of type 2 diabetes so that you can better manage, maintain and deal with it.
Know Your Family History
This is a key component of knowing the signs. Due to genes, people are predisposed for certain types of diseases, just like they can be predisposed for certain body types. Having an understanding of where the disease falls in your family, if at all, is a great start because it will give you a Continue reading

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