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Diabetes Insipidus (DI) Vs SIADH Syndrome Of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone NCLEX Review

Diabetes Insipidus (DI) vs SIADH Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone NCLEX Review

Diabetes Insipidus (DI) vs SIADH Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone NCLEX Review

SIADH vs Diabetes Insipdius! Are you studying diabetes insipidus and SIADH and find it very confusing discerning between the two disease processes? You are not alone!
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In this article, I am going to easily break down the differences between diabetes insipidus (DI) and SIADH (Syndrome of Inappropriate Anti-diuretic Hormone). I addition, I provide a lecture on how to remember the differences between the two!
Don’t forget to take the SIADH vs Diabetes Insipidus Quiz.
What is Diabetes Insipidus and SIADH?
This is where the body has a problem producing ADH (either too much or not enough). What is ADH? It is anti-diuretic hormone. This hormone is produced in the hypothalamus, and stored and eventually released in the posterior pituitary gland. In order to understand diabetes insipidus and SIADH, you MUST understand how ADH works because ADH plays an important role in both DI an SIADH.
Lecture on SIADH and DI
Key Points to Remember about SIADH and DI
Each condition is related the secretion of ADH (anti-diuretic hormone also called vasopressin) which plays a major role in how the body RETAINS water.
Each condition presents oppositely of each other (ex: in SIADH the patient retains water vs. DI where the patient loses water)—-Remember they are opposite of each other!
Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mel Continue reading

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New Diabetes Products for 2017: Glucometers and CGMs

New Diabetes Products for 2017: Glucometers and CGMs

For the last year, Diabetes Self-Management has been following all the new innovations and products aimed at helping to improve the lives of those living with diabetes. From the latest glucometers and monitoring systems to insulin pumps, pens, and treatments, several major advancements made their impact on the diabetes community in 2016.
When selecting some of the new products, we first talked to Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. Scheiner, known as the MacGyver of diabetes products, has lived with Type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years. He tries out new products before recommending them to patients. “It’s important to see new products from the user’s point of view, not just from the [health-care practitioner’s] side of things,” said Scheiner.
In 2016, the pace of innovation continued to race ahead with unbelievable technology right out of a Star Trek episode. The growing use of smartphone technology and mobile applications has led to better access to blood glucose readings, general health information, and much more. Read on to learn about the newest products. We guarantee you there’s something here for everyone, whether you live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes.
In this installment, we look at glucometers and CGMs that have recently hit the market.
Glucometers and CGMs
With the FDA’s approval of Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G, people with Type 1 diabetes will have the option of the first hybrid closed-loop insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring system. According to study results, the MiniMed Continue reading

Cancer Drug Gleevec Might Slow Type-1 Diabetes

Cancer Drug Gleevec Might Slow Type-1 Diabetes

Gleevec, the daily pill that turned a killer type of leukemia into a manageable disease, may also help slow the worsening of diabetes, researchers reported Monday.
In a follow up to a 2008 study in which diabetic mice were cured by the drug, a team reports “modest” effects in adults with type-1 diabetes. This is the type of diabetes often called juvenile diabetes and it’s caused when the immune system mistakenly destroys insulin-producing cells called beta cells.
Tests done in 67 adults with type-1 diabetes showed the drug appeared to boost their body's own production of insulin, Dr. Stephen Gitelman of the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine told a meeting of the American Diabetes Association.
“On average the people that got the medicine used less insulin,” Gitelman told NBC News.
He stressed that it is a small trial meant to show the drug can safely do in people what it did in mice.
“We just wanted to get a sense if this showed some benefit in adults so we could get to the target population in kids,” Gitelman said.
“The conservative estimate is that beta cell function was maybe 19 percent better at one year. So it’s not a slam-dunk home run.”
The team will have to get Food and Drug Administration permission to test the drug in children.
About 5 percent of the 29 million Americans with diabetes have Type-1 diabetes.
It’s an autoimmune disease, caused when the body mistakenly destroys pancreatic cells that produce hormones like insulin and glucagon that control blood sugar. High glucose levels damage tiny blood vessels, which in t Continue reading

When Goals Are Not Met in Diabetes Care

When Goals Are Not Met in Diabetes Care

A presentation at the fall live meeting of the ACO & Emerging Healthcare Delivery Coalition® focused on the clinical and economic consequences of not meeting glycemic goals in patients with type 2 diabetes.
Clinical and economic burdens are placed on the US healthcare system when target goals are not met in diabetes care. In 2012, total costs (direct and indirect) associated with diabetes in the United States were $245 billion dollars.1 In a presentation at the 2017 Fall ACO & Emerging Healthcare Delivery Coalition®, hosted by The American Journal of Managed Care® on October 26th, 2017, Kari Uusinarkaus, MD, discussed the economic impact of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This presentation focused on the prevalence, costs, and consequences of not meeting glycemic goals in patients with T2D.
Approximately 16.5 million people in the United States have T2D.2 The majority of adult patients (90%-95%) with diabetes have T2D.1 Risk factors associated with the occurrence of T2DM include ethnicity (eg, American Indians, African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Asians, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders), male gender, older age, obesity, family history, gestational diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, and physical inactivity.
Diabetes increases the risk of developing complications (eg, neurological, peripheral vascular, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine/metabolic, ophthalmic).3 More than 60% of patients with T2D die from cardiovascular disease.4 From 1998 to 2011, the overall death rate among patients with T2D was 38.64 per 1000 person-years.5 The risk of death in patients with T2D increase Continue reading

Diabetes life expectancy 'improving'

Diabetes life expectancy 'improving'

Life expectancy for diabetes patients in Scotland has improved, a Dundee University study has found.
A major study carried out by the university and the Scottish Diabetes Research Network showed that people with type 1 diabetes die significantly younger than the general population.
Men with the condition live about 11 years less than those without it, while women live about 13 years less.
However, previous research had reported a gap of between 15 and 27 years.
Major advances have occurred in the treatment of type 1 diabetes over the last 30 years, and scientists said the life expectancy study could help future care plans and in the setting of insurance premiums.
Diabetes is an incurable condition which leaves the body unable to control blood sugar levels, with type 1 causing the pancreas to stop producing insulin, a hormone which regulates the amount of glucose in blood.
Diabetes charities such as Diabetes UK generally cite losses of life expectancy of between 15 and 20 years for type 1 patients, while estimates from the United States in the 1970s reported a loss of 27 years.
However, the study run by Prof Helen Colhoun and Shona Livingstone at the university, shows contemporary life expectancy has improved.
Life expectancy
They studied the cases of more than 24,000 individuals with type 1 diabetes who were aged 20 or older between 2008 and 2010.
They found that 47% of men and 55% of women with the condition survived to age 70, compared to 76% of men and 83% of women without it.
On average, men with diabetes lived for 46.2 further years after turning 20, compared to 57.3 y Continue reading

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