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Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs: Symptoms & Treatments

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs: Symptoms & Treatments

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs: Symptoms & Treatments

Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus are two different types of diabetes in dogs, and both can be serious if left untreated. Diabetes insipidus is also known as “water diabetes” and is the more rare form. It affects water metabolism and prevents the body from conserving water, which results in increased urination and diluted, almost clear urine. It is not related to diabetes mellitus in canines, which is also known as “sugar diabetes.” Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas that affects the body’s ability to convert food into fuel. Here is what you should know about the symptoms and treatments for diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus.
Symptoms Of Diabetes In Dogs
Diabetes insipidus comes in two forms in canines, and both are related to the pituitary gland and result in similar symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus happens when the pituitary doesn’t release enough of a hormone called vassopressin, an anti-diuretic. This can be caused by birth defect, head injury, or tumor. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is the other form. It happens when the kidneys don’t respond to the vassopressin that the pituitary produces. It can be caused by birth defect, exposure to drugs, metabolic disorders, or renal failure. Both types will result in the following symptoms in dogs.
Excessive urination
Excessive drinking and thirst
Weight loss
Decreased urination due to dehydration
Poor coat health
Accidents in the house
Diabetes mellitus is a pancreatic condition that also comes in two forms in canines. Insulin-deficiency diabetes mellitus is when the body doesn’t pro Continue reading

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Omega-3s may help to treat type 1 diabetes

Omega-3s may help to treat type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an incurable autoimmune disorder of unknown origin. New research, however, may pave the way for novel, more efficient therapies for type 1 diabetes, as omega-3 fatty acids are found to reduce the autoimmune responses typical of the disease.
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that affects approximately 1.25 million adults and children in the United States.
In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system does not recognize its own beta cells, so it attacks and destroys them. Beta cells are responsible for creating insulin.
The body needs insulin to transport glucose into cells, where it is needed for producing energy. Without insulin-producing beta cells, the glucose builds up in the blood stream, and the body cannot use it for energy.
It is not yet known what causes type 1 diabetes, and there is currently no cure for the illness. The most common treatment option is administering insulin, but the ultimate goal of the medical research community is to stop the body's immune system from attacking its own beta cells, or reversing this process.
New research, published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, investigates the benefits of adding omega-3 fatty acids to the diet of mice with type 1 diabetes.
Omega-3s are a class of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). They are typically found in fish, seafood, and some vegetable oils, as well as in dietary supplements.
These fatty acids are important for the good functioning of several organs, as these beneficial fats improve the activity of muscles, prevent blood clotting, help digestion, and aid the division Continue reading

The Global Diabetes Epidemic

The Global Diabetes Epidemic

Twelve years ago, my husband and I packed up all of our belongings and moved to Trivandrum — a steamy, tropical town at the southern tip of India in Kerala. At the time, I was a medical student interested in studying stroke. For the next six months I dressed in a sari and walked to work on jungle roads. At the hospital, I immediately began seeing a steady stream of young patients affected by strokes, many of whom were so severely disabled that they were unable to work. I initially suspected the cause was tuberculosis or dengue fever — after all, this was the developing world, where infections have long been primary culprits for disease. But I soon learned that my hunch was wrong.
One of my first patients was a woman in her mid-30s who came in with a headache, vomiting and an unsteady gait. Her scan showed a brainstem stroke. Her blood sugars were very high. The underlying cause of her stroke was most likely untreated Type 2 diabetes. Here I was, halfway around the globe, in a vastly foreign culture, but I was looking at a disease — and the lifestyle that fostered it — that was startlingly familiar.
Today, I am an endocrinologist, and diabetes has become a full-blown epidemic in India, China, and throughout many emerging economies.
In the United States, diabetes tends to be a disease that, while certainly not benign, is eminently manageable. Just this month, federal researchers reported that health risks for the approximately 25 million Americans with diabetes had fallen sharply over the last two decades. Elsewhere on the globe, however, diabetes plays out in a drama Continue reading

When the Diabetes Honeymoon Ends

When the Diabetes Honeymoon Ends

A D-mom feels guilt over her son’s increased insulin needs.
My son’s honeymoon phase was like diabetes with training wheels, a seemingly manageable level of uncertainty. His body was still producing some insulin, and that made dosing somewhat of a guessing game, but his A1C was great and I felt like I had gotten the hang of being a D-mom.
Then he caught a cold. It was a year after his diagnosis and he slowly started requiring more insulin. Before, he could go a long time without injections, but now he really needed them to keep his sugars down. He went from using half a unit of long-acting insulin a day to requiring that in one hour.
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I felt guilty every time I had to increase his basal rate. No matter how many times his care team told me this would happen, I was still caught off guard. A part of me secretly believed that since his insulin requirements were so minimal and his blood sugars were close to normal, he didn’t really have Type 1 diabetes. When reality set in, I felt like I should have stopped it somehow.
At our next appointment, the endocrinologist noted the increased insulin usage and higher A1C. The honeymoon was over, he said. He asked our son if he knew what the honeymoon period was and why he was using more insulin. Our son said he had no idea. To him, it was just diabetes. While I felt like I was failing him and that he was getting sicker, he hadn’t even noticed. I realized I needed to shift my attitude on diabetes to follow his lead.
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The honeymoon was over, insulin therapy has become a big part in daily life, and that is somewhat sad. Continue reading

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I am on two different types of insulin, NovoLog and Levemir (insulin detemir). Can diabetes have any bearing on mood swings or sudden “bad mood episodes”? Continue reading

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