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Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

To date, 2016 has been the hottest year ever, and it’s getting hotter. From now on, coping with heat will be an important part of managing diabetes.
Some knowledge that might help you:
1. High body temperatures can lower blood sugar. Mayo Clinic writers Nancy Klobassa Davidson, RN, and Peggy Moreland, RN, CDE, say you should check your sugars more often in the hot weather.
2. Sunburn can raise blood sugar. The Mayo Clinic advises wearing a good sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat while out in the sun.
3. Warm skin absorbs insulin faster, while dehydrated skin absorbs insulin more slowly. The closer you can keep your injection site to normal temperature and hydration, the better.
4. Dehydration from sweating can raise blood sugar and can lead to heat exhaustion. According to the Cleveland Clinic, people with diabetes are more likely than others to be admitted to hospitals for dehydration and heat exhaustion, and to die from it.
High glucose levels lead to urinating more, which increases risk for dehydration. This may be especially true if you’re on an SGLT-2 inhibitor drug. Keep drinking water with a bit of salt if you are blessed to live in an area where water is available. Have a bottle with you and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
Learn to check yourself for dehydration by pinching up some skin on your arm and letting it go. It should snap right back into place. If it goes more slowly, you are getting dehydrated. Don’t drink alcohol or caffeine in super-hot weather, as they are dehydrating.
5. Heat can damage insulin, other medications, and test strips. Th Continue reading

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10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes
When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb.
Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading

7 Mobile Apps to Help Manage Diabetes

7 Mobile Apps to Help Manage Diabetes

Nearly 26 million people in the United States have diabetes, a metabolic disease in which the body can't effectively produce or use glucose for energy. That's more than 8% of the total population, and an additional 5,200 Americans over the age of 20 receive a new diagnosis every day.
App developers have focused on catering to people with diabetes for quite some time, creating tools to help track blood glucose levels, set medication reminders and even find quick nutritional information to avoid carb-heavy foods.
Below, we've rounded up some of the most useful and popular apps out there today to help connected folks manage diabetes. Continue reading

12 Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

12 Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

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Diabetes is at epidemic proportions across the globe and most people know someone living with this condition. The serious physical and mental health complications associated with all types of diabetes however, are less widely known.
Here are 12 things you might not know about diabetes.
1. The personal and social costs of diabetes are enormous
If you live with diabetes you will know that it is not just about sugar. Most people associate diabetes with the sweet stuff, but it is far more complicated than that. Many people experience significant impact on their social and emotional wellbeing.
2. There are a number of types of diabetes, and while they have similar impacts on your body, they are very different diseases
There are three basic types - type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (pregnancy diabetes). They have similar problems in relation to lack of insulin, but have different causes and management regimes. Type 2 diabetes never turns into type 1 diabetes, but many people with type 2 diabetes will eventually need some insulin injections to manage due to the progressive nature of the condition.
3. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and nothing to do with lifestyle or eating too much sugar
In type 1 diabetes the pancreas does not make insulin at all because the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by the body’s own immune system. While we are getting closer, we still don’t understand why this happens, but some kind of trigger sets of an autoimmune attack. It is usually diagnosed in people under 40, but ca Continue reading

Body temperature regulation in diabetes

Body temperature regulation in diabetes

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Introduction
Diabetes mellitus, commonly known as diabetes, refers to a group of metabolic disorders which are associated with an impaired ability to regulate glycemia. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the most prevalent forms of the disease representing ~10 and ~90% of cases, respectively.1 Type 1 diabetes was formerly known as juvenile diabetes due to its common presentation in children and adolescents, and is characterized by the endocrine pancreas ceasing to produce insulin following the immune-mediated destruction of β-islet cells.2 Therefore, management of type 1 diabetes always requires exogenous delivery of insulin. Although the causes of type 1 diabetes remain to be elucidated, it is probably caused by a combination of genetic predisposition (with >40 loci known to affect susceptibility)3 and various environmental factors including stress and viruses.4 On the other hand, type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in adults and typically involves a combination of insulin resistance and relative (rather than absolute) deficiency of insulin.5 While the causes of type 2 diabetes are also incompletely understood, a plethora of studies have found associations with excessive abdominal adiposity,6 sedentary lifestyle, and poor dietary habits7 along with genetic factors. In contrast to type 1, type 2 diabetes may be treated in several ways including non-insulin pharmaceuticals, lifestyle modifications as well as exogenous insulin administration.
Diabetes is becoming a worldwide public health issue, with the global prevalence in 2014 estimated at 9% among adults.8 By 2035 Continue reading

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