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Diabetes: How To Spot The Signs Before It’s Too Late

Diabetes: How to spot the signs before it’s too late

Diabetes: How to spot the signs before it’s too late

Sometimes the hustle and bustle of life distract us so much that we can’t see the signs our bodies give us about the condition of our health, especially with diseases like diabetes at an all-time high in this country. I know this to be true because there have been times that I’ve worn myself down by ignoring what my body was trying to tell me and I’d become sick for weeks at a time. In the midst of getting things done and being a “boss” too many people let their health decline; sometimes to the point of no return.
I have been dealing with a diabetic mother for a long time now. There are good days and not so good days. I can gauge the seriousness of her condition daily based on the signs, but it was not always like that. When she was first diagnosed with the autoimmune disease (type 2 diabetes) about 12 years ago, there were a lot of scary trips to the hospital and a lot of days not knowing what to expect next. Take it from me that it’s true you become a kind of “expert” about a disease when faced with it personally. That’s why knowing what to look for is so important. It can literally be the difference between life and death.
So here are some tips on knowing the signs of type 2 diabetes so that you can better manage, maintain and deal with it.
Know Your Family History
This is a key component of knowing the signs. Due to genes, people are predisposed for certain types of diseases, just like they can be predisposed for certain body types. Having an understanding of where the disease falls in your family, if at all, is a great start because it will give you a Continue reading

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10 diabetes superfoods

10 diabetes superfoods


People whose diets include large amounts of nuts put on less weight than those that do not. Weight loss can help to reduce blood sugars.
Add crushed walnuts to yogurt, oats, or salad.
Make a trail mix treat with walnuts, pumpkin seeds, and dark chocolate chips.
Avocados are a good source of healthy fats and vitamins.
The avocado is the only fruit that is a good source of healthy fat. Avocados also provide about 20 different vitamins and minerals, and are especially high in potassium , vitamins C, E, and K, lutein, and beta-carotene .
Eating foods that contain healthy fats may help increase fullness. Eating fat slows the digestion of carbohydrates, which helps to keep blood sugar levels more stable.
Avocado is high in fiber too, with half a fruit containing 6-7 grams. According to the Department of Internal Medicine and Nutritional Sciences Program of the University of Kentucky, high fiber intake is associated with a significantly lower risk for diabetes .
Eating high-fiber foods can also reduce blood pressure and cholesterol levels, improve weight loss, and make insulin more efficient.
Spread avocado on toast in the morning instead of butter.
Use avocado instead of mayonnaise in chicken or egg salad.
Ezekiel bread is one of the healthiest types of bread as it contains less processed ingredients.
Ezekiel bread and other sprouted grain breads are less processed than standard white and whole wheat bread.
The grains in Ezekiel bread are soaked and sprouted, allowing for higher protein and nutrient content.
Bread made from sprouted grains tends to contain more B v Continue reading

The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus

The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus


The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus
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The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus
Khanh vinh quoc Luong and Lan Thi Hoang Nguyen
Thiamine acts as a coenzyme for transketolase (Tk) and for the pyruvate dehydrogenase and -ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes, enzymes which play a fundamental role for intracellular glucose metabolism. The relationship between thiamine and diabetes mellitus (DM) has been reported in the literature. Thiamine levels and thiamine-dependent enzyme activities have been reduced in DM. Genetic studies provide opportunity to link the relationship between thiamine and DM (such as Tk, SLC19A2 gene, transcription factor Sp1, -1-antitrypsin, and p53). Thiamine and its derivatives have been demonstrated to prevent the activation of the biochemical pathways (increased flux through the polyol pathway, formation of advanced glycation end-products, activation of protein kinase C, and increased flux through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway) induced by hyperglycemia in DM.Thiamine definitively has a role in the diabetic endothelial vascular diseases (micro and macroangiopathy), lipid p Continue reading

Why diabetes increases burn risk, and tips to stay safe

Why diabetes increases burn risk, and tips to stay safe

Burns can happen to anyone, but people with diabetes may be more susceptible than others. In fact, between 10 and 15 percent of patients admitted to our Burn Center have diabetes.
High or unstable blood sugar levels, the hallmark of diabetes, can damage your nerves and blood vessels. This can cause poor circulation, which can leave you feeling cold, particularly your feet.
We often see patients who were burned trying to warm their legs and feet using hot water and heating pads or by propping them up against heaters and radiators. In the summer, we see people who burn their feet walking barefoot on very hot concrete.
Damaged nerves cause you to lose feeling, so you may not be aware you're being burned. And it also leaves your body less able to fight infection and heal from a burn.
Even a small burn can quickly get out of control, and one in 10 patients with diabetes who burn their feet requires amputation. But by following a few simple tips to prevent burns and seeking immediate treatment when one occurs, we can better thwart these types of outcomes.
Tips to prevent burns when you have diabetes
There are a few simple things you can do to avoid burn injuries:
Set a timer when using a heating pad. This will ensure you don’t accidentally leave it on too long or fall asleep with it on. It’s also a good idea to put a piece of cloth/clothing between the pad and your skin.
Avoid sitting too close to a warming device, such as a heater, radiator or fireplace. They can be hotter than you think and cause mild or severe burns.
Check water temperature with a thermometer or your elbow Continue reading

Glu : The New Complication: Aging with Type 1 Diabetes

Glu : The New Complication: Aging with Type 1 Diabetes


Update: You can now listen to our Diabetespeaks podcast episode of this event by clicking here: https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-ny8f7-7e17c9
With incredible breakthroughs in diabetes technology, therapy and clinical care, people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are living longer than ever. But as people age, they take on a whole separate host of challenges that are compounded by T1D. Many fear they will not have the self-reliance, care, support, or financial resources necessary to manage their blood sugar and continue to live well with diabetes in their golden years.
Last month, this concerning issue was presented at T1D Exchanges Annual Meeting. Four individuals currently or soon facing this dilemma spoke on a patient panel, bringing to light a new complication of type 1 diabetes rarely discussed in a public forum.
This is a new problem, based on our recent success in treating T1D, said Dr. Nick Argento , an endocrinologist and person with diabetes (PWD). The Joslin 50-year survivors used to be sort of an elite group. Thats not true anymore. Now, its expected, not the exception.
Joining Argento on stage was Paul Madden, Bunny Kasper, and Sandy Brooks, each with a different diabetes experience, but all in their later stages of life.
Bunny Kasper , who is in her mid-seventies and has lived with diabetes most of her adult life, volunteers as a support group leader for families with children who have T1D. She shared that this group of parents recently commented that she should find diabetes management easier because shes been doing it for so long. But what they didnt u Continue reading

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