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Diabetes Has Become One Of The Most Expensive And Lethal Diseases In The World

Diabetes Has Become One of the Most Expensive and Lethal Diseases in the World

Diabetes Has Become One of the Most Expensive and Lethal Diseases in the World

Recent research shows life expectancy has declined in the U.S. for the first time in two decades. A follow-up study suggests type 2 diabetes is a factor in this declining life expectancy
About half of all American adults are either pre-diabetic or diabetic. Between 1990 and 2013, diabetes rates rose by 71 percent in the U.S.
While death certificates suggest diabetes is involved in about 3.5 percent of deaths in the U.S., the real number is likely around 12 percent; among the obese it may be 19 percent, suggesting diabetes may be the third leading cause of death
By Dr. Mercola
Late last year, research1,2,3 showed life expectancy has declined in the U.S. for the first time in two decades, leaving researchers searching for clues as to the cause.
While drug overdoses appear to have contributed to the decline, obesity also plays a major role. Now, a follow-up study4 suggests type 2 diabetes is a major factor. As reported by Vox:5
"[R]esearchers have long known that diabetes is an underreported cause of death on death certificates, the primary data source for determining life expectancy trends.
That's because people with diabetes often have multiple health conditions, or "comorbidities," such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity and even cancer …
[According to] Andrew Stokes, assistant professor of global health at Boston University's School of Public Health … '[T]o some extent, deaths that should be attributed to diabetes go to other causes.'"
Indeed, the links between diabetes and other lethal conditions such as heart disease and cancer Continue reading

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Diabetes and eye disease: How diabetes affects vision and eye health

Diabetes and eye disease: How diabetes affects vision and eye health

One of the complications associated with diabetes is eye disease. Diabetes can wreak havoc on your vision and eye health, in some cases leading to vision loss. If you have diabetes, it’s important that you keep your condition well managed. If you don’t, you should take the necessary preventative measures to reduce your risk and protect your vision along with overall health.
Regardless of the type, diabetics have a 25 percent higher risk of vision loss, compared to the general population without diabetes. In diabetes, your body cannot store sugar properly. This fluctuation in blood sugar levels can damage your blood vessels, especially those that supply blood to your eyes. As a result, diabetes means an increased risk for eye complications, including cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy.
Diabetes-related eye diseases
Diabetic retinopathy: High blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels. Too much sugar can also cause blockages to the blood vessels in the retina, obstructing the flow of oxygenated blood. The new blood vessels that are being produced do not develop properly, so they leak.
There are two types of diabetic retinopathy: early diabetic retinopathy and advanced diabetic retinopathy.
Early diabetic retinopathy: In this form of diabetic retinopathy, new blood vessels are not produced. The walls of the blood vessels going to the retina become weak and tiny bulges begin to protrude. This can cause blood and fluid to leak into the retina. Large blood vessels can also assume an irregular diameter, and more blood vessels become blocked.
Nerve fibers in the ret Continue reading

Diabetes and mood swings: Effects on relationships

Diabetes and mood swings: Effects on relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood.
Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion.
It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience.
Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship.
Contents of this article:
How do diabetes and mood swings go together?
Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low.
Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression.
Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per dec Continue reading

Reversing Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Reversing Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

The drugs that are approved to reduce the pain of diabetic peripheral neuropathy are expensive. But your doctor can prescribe much less costly drugs that might save you thousands of dollars and may work equally well.
No drugs do anything more than cut the pain. To reverse the neuropathy, you have to act.
A pair of articles that the American College of Physicians published in its November 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine compares our choices and recommends our options. The first of these articles is a review of the "Pharmacologic Interventions for Painful Diabetic Neuropathy" by nine doctors, most of whom work at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. The second article is an editorial, "Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: Many Similarly Effective Therapies With Widely Dissimilar Costs," by two doctors at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
The review concluded that several different types of drugs can reduce the pain of peripheral neuropathy, but nobody knows which ones work best. The editorial took the analysis one step further: since the prices of these drugs are vastly different, start with those that cost less.
The lead author of the editorial, Brian C. Callaghan, M.D., sent me the full-text of both articles. "Because current evidence does not suggest that the effectiveness of these agents substantively differ," he wrote, "cost considerations should be a prominent part of clinicians’ decision making."
According to drugstore.com, pregabalin (brand name Lyrica) is the most expensive, $2,279.76 per year. Duloxetine (brand name Cymbalta) follows at $2,051.88. Mu Continue reading

Drinking alcohol three to four days a week 'could reduce risk of diabetes'

Drinking alcohol three to four days a week 'could reduce risk of diabetes'

Drinking alcohol three or four days each week can significantly protect against developing diabetes, a study has found.
Going for a drink or consuming alcohol at home most days was associated with a reduced risk of 27 per cent in men and 32 per cent in women, compared with abstaining.
Wine had the biggest effect, probably because it contains chemical compounds that improve blood sugar balance, said researchers.
But there was a warning to women to stay clear of the gin bottle. A daily tipple of “mothers' ruin” or other spirits increased the diabetes risk to women by 83 per cent.
Previous studies had already suggested that light to moderate alcohol consumption can cut the risk of diabetes, but the new research is the first to focus on drinking frequency.
Scientists studied data on 70,551 men and women taking part in a large Danish health survey who were quizzed about their drinking habits and monitored for five years.
The authors, led by Professor Janne Tolstrup from the University of Southern Denmark, wrote in the journal Diabetologia: “Our findings suggest that alcohol drinking frequency is associated with the risk of diabetes and that consumption of alcohol over 3 to 4 weekdays is associated with the lowest risks of diabetes, even after taking average weekly alcohol consumption into account.”
During the follow-up period, a total of 859 men and 887 women from the study group developed diabetes. The investigation did not distinguish between the two forms of diabetes, Type 1 and the much more common Type 2.
In terms of the amount of alcohol consumed, men who downed 14 Continue reading

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