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Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth?
Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes
your teeth
your gums
your jaw
tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks
Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath.
Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control.
What happens if I have plaque?
Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis.
When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the Continue reading

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How to Build Muscle with Diabetes?

How to Build Muscle with Diabetes?

This article is suitable for anyone interested in improving the look of their body right through to the professional bodybuilder, and athlete looking to improve performance.
How do you build muscle?
Lift weights?
Consume enough protein?
Get enough rest?
{Repeat}
^ Yes, Pretty much!
Everyone has the potential to build muscle over the course of their lifetime.
Some people are happy with the level of muscle mass they have while others desire more for performance and aesthetic related reasons.
The ability to gain muscle is highly specific to an individual’s genetics, baseline hormone levels and day to day activity. Many of these factors change as we age, reducing our capacity to gain muscle as we age. In other words, Muscle mass increases as we age up until a certain point.
The effect of age on work capacity and muscle growth is a complex and lengthy subject. In fact, there is an hour long video module on the topic on the member’s site (coming soon).
Anyhow,
The best way to stimulate muscle growth is regular weights resistance training or loaded body movement.
Even though we perform loaded movements daily, such as
Squatting down to pick up our pets,
Carrying the groceries to the car,
Pushing annoying people ‘out the way.’
Pulling the kids around,
Picking things up (hip-hinge) of the ground
Day to Day Movement Isn’t Enough. None of these movements load our muscles heavily or frequently enough to stimulate gains in muscle mass.
Weights resistance training is an incredibly useful tool for increasing muscle mass, especially with diabetes.
The intensity (load) and frequenc Continue reading

Lowering Cardiovascular Disease Risk for Patients With Diabetes

Lowering Cardiovascular Disease Risk for Patients With Diabetes

BACKGROUND
Pharmacists are in the unique position to not only educate patients about diabetes but also discuss the preventable complications that can stem from diabetes. Specifically, pharmacists can help to address risk factors that contribute to cardiovascular disease, such as hypertension, lipid levels, and antiplatelet agents and offer lifestyle modifications when reviewing medications and counseling their patients about this chronic health disease.
The CDC 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report estimated that over 30 million individuals, or 9.4% of the US population, have diabetes.1 Of these 30 million people, about 25% do not have a diabetes diagnosis.1 In 2015, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death, with heart disease as the leading cause.2 The contributing factors to these statistics include the complications that accompany diabetes, such as heart disease and stroke; eye problems that can lead to blindness; and kidney disease and amputations. There is a strong correlation between diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes.3 In fact, at least 68% of adults >65 years with diabetes die from some form of heart disease, and adults with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without the condition (figure 14).5,6
Pharmacists should ensure that patients have access to all the resources needed to control blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin and should edu- cate patients to ensure they take the steps necessary to minimize risks for complications. Even when glucose i Continue reading

Opinion Losing weight is hard but not any harder if you have type 2 diabetes

Opinion Losing weight is hard but not any harder if you have type 2 diabetes

Losing weight is an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes but beliefs that it's harder to shed kilos when diabetic are unfounded, write Andrew Brown, Mike Lean and Wilma Leslie.
OPINION: A study has found weight loss could reverse type 2 diabetes. The UK clinical trial showed that 46% of people who followed a low-calorie diet, among other measures, for 12 months were able to stop their type 2 diabetes medications.
This confirms a position outlined in a previous paper that people can beat diabetes into remission if they lost about 15 kilograms. Another study showed that prediabetes (a blood sugar level that is high, but lower than necessary for diabetes diagnosis) can be prevented by losing as little as 2kg.
If weight loss isn’t already hard enough, many people think it’s more difficult if you have diabetes. One small study perhaps sowed the seed for this defeatist idea. A dozen overweight diabetic subjects and their overweight non-diabetic spouses were treated together in a behavioural weight-control program. After 20 weeks, the diabetic group lost 7.4kg on average while their non-diabetic spouses lost 13.4kg.
But there’s more to this story than meets the eye. In fact, losing weight with type 2 diabetes is no harder than it is without it.
Where does this idea come from?
Type 2 diabetes triples the risk of heart attack and stroke, and is the leading cause of blindness, amputations and kidney failure. Treatment with modern drugs improves the outlook, but complications still develop and life expectancy is substantially reduced, especially for younger people. So beating Continue reading

Prediabetes: A high-risk state for developing diabetes

Prediabetes: A high-risk state for developing diabetes

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Introduction
Prediabetes, typically defined as blood glucose levels above normal but below diabetes thresholds, is a risk state that defines a high chance of developing diabetes. Diagnostic criteria for prediabetes have changed over time and currently vary depending on the institution (table 1).
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), high risk for developing diabetes relates to two distinct states, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of 6.1–6.9 mmol/L (in the absence of impaired glucose tolerance – IGT) and IGT defined as postload plasma glucose of 7.8–11.0 mmol/L based on 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or a combination of both.1 The American Diabetes Association (ADA), although applying the same thresholds for IGT, uses a lower cut-off value for IFG (FPG 5.6–6.9 mmol/L) and has additionally introduced haemoglobin A1c levels of 5.7–6.4% as a new category of high diabetes risk.2
The term prediabetes itself has been critised on the basis that (1) many people with prediabetes do not progress to diabetes, (2) the term may imply that no intervention is necessary as no disease is present, and (3) diabetes risk does not necessarily differ between people with prediabetes and those with a combination of other diabetes risk factors. Indeed, the WHO used the term ‘Intermediate Hyperglycaemia’ and an International Expert Committee convened by the ADA the ‘High Risk State of Developing Diabetes’ rather than ‘prediabetes’.1,3 For brevity, we use the term prediabetes in this seminar to refer to IFG, IGT and Continue reading

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