diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's

A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action.
The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes.
Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease."
Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer's Society, who part- funded the research.
Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society, said: ""With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them."
Although the benefits of these 'triple agonist' drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with existing diabetes drugs such as liraglutide have shown real promise for people with Alzheimer's, so further development of this work is crucial."
This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in multiple ways to protect the brain Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Diabetes Drug ‘Significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ in Mice With Alzheimer’s

Diabetes Drug ‘Significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ in Mice With Alzheimer’s

A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer’s after scientists found it “significantly reversed memory loss” in mice through a triple method of action.
The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes.
Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment “holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.”
Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer’s Society, who part-funded the research.
Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer’s. It’s imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them.”
Although the benefits of these ‘triple agonist’ drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with existing diabetes drugs such as liraglutide have shown real promise for people with Alzheimer’s, so further development of this work is crucial.”
This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in Continue reading

THE MINIMUM AGE FOR DIABETES IS DECLINING

THE MINIMUM AGE FOR DIABETES IS DECLINING

Watch out if your child drinks too much water and urinates too frequently!
Diabetes is encountered not only in adults but also in children. Professor Serap Semiz, head of the Pediatric Endocrinology Department in the Faculty of Medicine of Acıbadem University and a pediatrician at Acıbadem Kadıköy Hospital, states that while Type 1 diabetes, which is the type usually diagnosed in children, is encountered only very rarely in children under the age of 2, most children diagnosed with the disease in recent years are under the age of 5. In this article, Professor Semiz shares with families the ways of coping with Type 1 diabetes.
Stating that 90% of the patients who developed diabetes during childhood or adolescence have Type 1 diabetes and that the disease occurs most frequently at age 5 or 6, as well as during adolescence, Professor Serap Semiz notes that, in recent years, the rate of incidence in children below age 5 has increased.
Type 1 diabetes, which is usually triggered by environmental factors, is an autoimmune disease. In other words, our autoimmune system, which protects us from diseases, can sometimes misguidedly attack the healthy cells in our body as if they are foreign cells. When such an attack is against the beta cells of the pancreas which produce insulin, the resulting insulin deficiency causes diabetes to develop. In such cases, the insulin needed by the body has to be given externally.
The symptoms that give away the disease
It is important for the symptoms of diabetes to be recognized early in order to cope with diabetes. Professor Serap Semiz, who urge Continue reading

Diabetes breakthrough? New skin patch could end misery of daily insulin injections

Diabetes breakthrough? New skin patch could end misery of daily insulin injections

Scientists have created the special patch which stimulates the body’s own insulin production - and is completely pain-free.
The new device could revolutionise treatment of the condition, which affects around four million people in the UK.
Researchers say the game-changing invention delivers a natural substance extracted from brown algae - completely removing the need for painful and unpleasant daily injections.
They claim the pain-free weekly ‘smart’ patch only releases the active ingredients when needed.
It stimulates the body’s own insulin production and control blood sugar levels.
The biochemically formulated treatment does this by delivering a natural substance, which is extracted from brown algae and mixed with therapeutic agents, through dissolvable microneedles which penetrate the skin.
Dr Richard Leapman, scientific director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in Maryland, US, where the patch has been developed, said: “This experimental approach could be a way to take advantage of the fact that persons with type 2 diabetes can still produce some insulin.
“A weekly microneedle patch application would also be less complicated and painful than routines that require frequent blood testing.”
About four million people in the UK now have diabetes, with 90 per cent suffering from Type 2.
Type 1 is an auto-immune disease which cannot currently be cured.
Type 2 can be avoided by making lifestyle changes such as taking more exercise and eating a healthy diet.
An estimated 549,000 people have it but are unaware.
The condition Continue reading

How to Eat a Low Glycemic, Plant-Based Diet

How to Eat a Low Glycemic, Plant-Based Diet

Diabetes affects millions of people every single day. It may run in your family, leading to Type 1 diabetes, which is genetically disposed and irreversible, however, Type 2 diabetes is a whole other story. Type 2 diabetes develops due to poor blood sugar, usually influenced by lifestyle factors. Red meat, fatty foods, processed sugars, a diet high in refined carbohydrates, a lack of exercise, and poor weight management can all lead to Type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors include women with past histories of PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) and other hormonal disorders that affect insulin levels.
How Does Diabetes Happen in The First Place?
Diabetes occurs due to poor insulin function in the body. Normally, when a carbohydrate is consumed, the hormone insulin releases glucose from foods into the bloodstream where it helps turn the sugars into energy by helping glucose to enter the cells. All excess glucose is stored in the liver (which usually leads to excess fat storage.) However, in someone with diabetes, cells don’t properly absorb glucose, which results in consistently high blood sugar. This sugar cravings leading to more sugar intake, and the cycle happens all over again. Over time, this consistent poor glucose response leads to insulin resistance where the body keeps producing excess insulin but since it never works properly, so the muscles, liver, and cells aren’t able to use it for energy. Over time, the pancreas stops producing insulin.
Should We Avoid All Carbs?
A carb-free diet is not necessary, nor helpful, for improving diabetes. Many carbs such as non-star Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles