diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Drug Could Help Those Living With Parkinson's Disease, Research Reveals

Diabetes drug could help those living with Parkinson's disease, research reveals

Diabetes drug could help those living with Parkinson's disease, research reveals

A drug commonly used to treat diabetes could help those living with Parkinson’s disease, research has revealed.
By 2020 it is predicted that 162,000 individuals in the UK will be living with the condition. While existing drugs help to control its symptoms, there are currently none available which slow or halt its progression.
But now scientists say they have found that a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes appears to improve movement-related issues.
The benefit persisted even when the drug had not been taken for 12 weeks, suggesting it might be helping to slow the progression of the disease.
“It is not ready for us to say ‘well, everyone needs to start this drug’,” said Thomas Foltynie, professor of neurology at University College London and co-author of the study. “[But] if we can replicate these findings in a multicentre trial, especially with longer follow-up, then this can change the face of our approach to treating Parkinson’s.”
Writing in the Lancet, Foltynie and colleagues in the UK and US describe how they tested the impact of the drug, known as exenatide.
With recent studies suggesting problems with insulin signalling in the brain could be linked to neurodegenerative disorders, hopes have been raised that diabetes drugs could also be used to tackle Parkinson’s, with previous research – including in cell cultures and animals, as well as a recent pilot study on humans by Foltynie and colleagues – backing up the notion..
But the latest study is the first robust clinical trial of the drug, randomly allocating 60 people with Parkinson’s t Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
The Alarming Rise of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Teens

The Alarming Rise of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Teens

Having lived with type 1 diabetes since the age of four, I can say with certainty that, while it doesn’t stop me from living a full life, it gets in the way and adds stress and anxiety to what should be normal daily activities. A 20 minute walk can send my blood sugars plummeting on some occasions, while a 30 minute walk on another day might not impact my blood sugar levels at all. I have learned to fine tune and predict as much as possible, but diabetes is still a major obstacle that I have to contend with not only daily, but hourly, sometimes even many times an hour. If I had to calculate the time I spent managing diabetes each day, month or year, it wouldn’t be much less than the same as the amount of time I spend breathing. Diabetes is always on my mind and I’m constantly making decisions based on it, so to read the results of a 10 year study about increasing rates of diabetes in young people is a tough pill to swallow.
The study, recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, shows that the annual rate of newly-diagnosed cases of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in young people increased considerably from 2002-2012.
Why is this happening?
In the case of type 2 diabetes, weight is often a contributing factor. But there are unknowns at play. And no one knows what causes type 1 diabetes, let alone why it’s increasing. What I do know is I wouldn’t wish this burden on anyone, even if it’s manageable, so I hope we figure out why rates of are increasing and put a stop to it.
Over the course of a decade the SEARCH study looked at 11,245 youths (0 to 19 y Continue reading

Managing the Cost of Diabetes

Managing the Cost of Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most common and costly chronic diseases, affecting more than 30 million Americans, with a total annual cost of $245 billion.1
Prevalence continues to increase as obesity rises, with the highest rates of diabetes found in minorities and older Americans. Consequences of diabetes include hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, and blindness.2 Despite significant medical advancement in treatment, diabetes remains the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.3 As a result, health care providers must consider the impact of financial and educational barriers in outcomes associated with diabetic management.
Diabetes is associated with a significant financial burden both to the patient and to the health care system. In 2012, the estimated cost of direct med- ical care in diabetes was $176 billion.1 The cost of prescription medications accounted for 18% of that cost, while diabetic supplies accounted for 12%.1
Individuals with diabetes had more than double the cost of annual medical expenditures compared with those without, with an average annual cost of $13,700.1 Although government and private insurance provide patient assistance in managing these costs, financial barriers may still pose a significant obstacle to patients in optimizing diabetic management. Patients who are unable to afford their medications and diabetic supplies will have less than optimal control of their blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin, putting them at increased risk for diabetic complications.
Current guidelines provide detailed stepwise recomme Continue reading

Study: Most U.S. Adults with Diabetes are Properly Diagnosed

Study: Most U.S. Adults with Diabetes are Properly Diagnosed

The proportion of diabetes cases that go undiagnosed in the U.S. may be just 11%, much lower than previous, widely accepted estimates of one-quarter to one-third, a new study suggested.
The previous estimates were based on an analysis of national survey data that used only a single test to identify undiagnosed diabetes, but the new study used a second confirmatory test, as per guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), explained Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues.
The proportion of undiagnosed diabetes cases has also decreased over time, from 16% in 1988-1994 to the 11% figure in 2011-2014, they reported online in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
"Establishing the burden of undiagnosed diabetes is critical to monitoring public health efforts related to screening and diagnosis," Selvin's group wrote. "When a confirmatory definition is used, undiagnosed diabetes is a relatively small fraction of the total diabetes population; most U.S. adults with diabetes (about 90%) have received a diagnosis of the condition."
"If we're thinking about screening programs, these findings suggest that healthcare providers are doing a good job at diagnosing people when they're coming in contact with the healthcare system," Selvin said in a statement. "It's those people who are not coming in contact with the healthcare system that need to be a focus of our efforts to ensure cases of diabetes are not missed."
Selvin's group analyzed the same data that was used for the previous estimates, which were published by the CDC: the National Healt Continue reading

Lowering A1C Levels Naturally

Lowering A1C Levels Naturally

Call it what you will: hemoglobin A1C, glycosylated hemoglobin, HbA1c, or just “A1C,” this number plays a huge role in how your diabetes is managed. It’s also used to diagnose diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Your A1C is a blood test that provides information about your average blood sugar levels over the past three months. Your provider and diabetes care team use this number to gauge how things are going and if and how to tweak your diabetes treatment plan. For most people who have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends an A1C of less than 7%. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) advises a tighter goal of 6.5% or lower. Your goal may be completely different, and that’s OK (just make sure you know what it is!).
Why lower your A1C?
A1C goals aren’t decided upon out of thin air. The targets that the ADA, AACE, or your provider advise for you are based on clinical research, as well as other factors, such as your age, your overall health, and your risk of hypoglycemia. Landmark clinical trials, such as the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC), for example, have correlated lowering A1C with a decrease in diabetes-related complications. So, for every one point that you lower your A1C, you’ll lower your complication risk as follows:
• Eye disease by 76%
• Nerve damage by 60%
• Heart attack or stroke by 57%
• Kidney disease by 50%
It’s important to realize that your A1C reflects an average of your blood sugar numbers. Your A1C might be Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • 7 Ways You Can Help Someone Living with Type 2 Diabetes

    Approximately 29 million Americans live with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Type 2 diabetes is the most common, making up about 90 to 95 percent of all cases. So chances are, you know at least one person living with this disease. Type 2 diabetes is very different from type 1 diabetes. A person diagnosed with type 1 doesn't make any insulin, whereas peo ...

  • How service dogs help Canadians living with diabetes

    Trained noses help diabetes service dogs sniff out their owners’ low blood sugar – and even save their lives. That’s dogged determination. Ukita is a 2-year-old yellow Labrador retriever who loves hitting the golf course with her owner, Cory Carter, an electrician from Langley, B.C. Off the golf course, she follows Carter from site to site, joyfully wagging her tail and occasionally carrying ...

  • A cure for diabetes: Crash diet can REVERSE Type 2 in three months... and Isobel and Tony are living proof that you CAN stop the killer disease

    A crash diet lasting just three months can reverse Type 2 diabetes, a landmark study has shown. Nearly half the people who underwent the diet saw their condition go into remission — providing the strongest evidence yet that diabetes can be eradicated by simply losing weight. The patients had struggled with their condition for up to six years, using drugs to control their blood sugar levels. But ...

  • Blood Sugar Throughout the Day - for Normal People and Those with Diabetes

    Most of us have heard the term blood sugar bandied around enough that we think we know what it means, but few of us really understand the complexity of the system that makes a steady supply of fuel available to our cells around the clock. The basic facts are these: All animals have a small amount of a simple sugar called glucose floating around in their bloodstream all the time. This simple sugar ...

  • 47 Podiatrists Share Tips On Good Foot Care For Those With Diabetes

    Here is exactly what we asked our panel of experts: What tips would you give to someone who is newly diagnosed? Why do you think a lot of people ignore their foot care when it comes to diabetes? Featured Answer Dr. Ira H. Kraus, President, American Podiatric Medical Association A1: The most important tip I would give to anyone newly diagnosed with diabetes is to include a podiatrist in your care t ...

  • Effects of intermittent fasting on health markers in those with type 2 diabetes: A pilot study

    Go to: Abstract To determine the short-term biochemical effects and clinical tolerability of intermittent fasting (IF) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We describe a three-phase observational study (baseline 2 wk, intervention 2 wk, follow-up 2 wk) designed to determine the clinical, biochemical, and tolerability of IF in community-dwelling volunteer adults with T2DM. Biochemical, a ...

  • Chinese Medicine Promising In Preventing Diabetes Among Those At-Risk

    A combination of Chinese herbal medicines could help to keep pre-diabetes from becoming full-blown Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. Plus, the effects the herbal mixture — called Tianqi — on reducing diabetes risk was similar to that of the diabetes drugs metformin and acarbose, noted researchers from the University of Chicago. “Patients often struggle to make the necessary lifestyl ...

  • Tree Nut Benefits For Those With Diabetes

    You need to heed your doctor’s dietary advice and make diabetes management a priority, but do not avoid eating nuts just because you think they cause weight gain. Research indicates the opposite is true, that consuming nuts regularly promotes weight loss, and is associated with heart health and a reduced risk for diabetes. Pecans, walnuts, Brazil nuts, almonds, and hazelnuts contain an amino aci ...

  • Water Aerobics For Those With Diabetes: Benefits and Tips

    Water buoys us up, helps us move, and simultaneously provides the resistance necessary to tone muscle and get our heart pumping. This is why participating in water aerobics is beneficial for almost everyone, including people with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Water aerobics are the performance of cardio-boosting exercises in water, typically a swimming pool. The workout is usually done while standing in w ...

Related Articles