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Diabetes Drug And Aspirin Boosts Cancer Drug Effectiveness | Daily Mail Online

Diabetes drug and aspirin boosts cancer drug effectiveness | Daily Mail Online

Diabetes drug and aspirin boosts cancer drug effectiveness | Daily Mail Online


Metformin may slow breast cancer growth and reverse treatment resistance
Adding aspirin to a cancer drug could help combat tumors resistant to therapies
These include pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers, as well as melanomas
A widely-used diabetes drug and over-the-counter aspirin could help boost the effectiveness of cancer treatments, two studies suggest.
Research has found that metformin used to improve the way your body handles insulin may slow breast cancer growth and reverse treatment resistance.
Another study discovered adding aspirin to a cancer drug could make it more powerful in combating a group of tumors that are highly resistant to therapies.
These include some pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers, as well as a small percentage of melanomas.
Together, the findings offer hope for people with certain difficult-to-treat forms of the disease.
A widely-used diabetes drug and over-the-counter aspirin could help boost the effectiveness of cancer treatments, two studies suggest (stock image)
1 in 5 NBA players have heart scans that appear abnormal, study reveals
Canadian scientists found that metformin, used to treat type 2 diabetes, reduced the rapid reproduction of tumor cells in the laboratory.
It also prevented or delayed resistance to the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin.
Other laboratory experiments and tests on mice showed that metformin reversed protein markers associated with multiple drug resistance (MDR).
This meant the drug might help resistant breast cancers to start responding to treatment again, said the researchers.
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Manitoba First Nations get $19 million to fight diabetes

Manitoba First Nations get $19 million to fight diabetes


WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
A podiatry room in the Saul Sair Health Centre in the Siloam Mission.
This article was published 19/9/2017 (203 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.
Ottawa will pump $19 million over the next four years to combat the province's soaring diabetes epidemic on First Nations under a new health care deal that will focus on foot care.
Health Canada approved the funding and the lead Manitoba agency, Nanaandawewigamig, the First Nations Health and Social Secretariat of Manitoba, announced it in Portage la Prairie Tuesday.
It is believed to be the first ever regional program designed for and delivered by Indigenous people in their own communities to stem rising rates of amputation, one of the most tragic complications of diabetes
"We recognized the need and we have been working on obtaining funding to support these services for nearly 20 years," said Pimicikamak Chief Catherine Merrick, Nanaandawewigamig board chair, in a statement Tuesday.
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ADA: Oral Insulin May Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset

ADA: Oral Insulin May Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset


Home / Conditions / Type 1 Diabetes / ADA: Oral Insulin May Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset
ADA: Oral Insulin May Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset
In adults with two or more antibodies predicting the development of type 1 diabetes, treatment with daily oral insulin therapy did not prevent development of the disease, but a small subset experienced a 31-month delay in clinical diabetes development.
Close relatives of people with type 1 diabetes who had certain autoantibodies that put them at high risk of progression to clinical type 1 diabetes did not benefit from taking oral insulin vs placebo, according to a new trial. The participants were mostly children and adolescents, with a median age of 8. However, surprisingly, among a small subset of participants with the same autoantibodies against islet cells but with low insulin secretion, those who received insulin tablets were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 2.5 years later than those who got placebo.
This was the largest trial ever performed using oral insulin and even though the results were not a homerun, a pre-specified secondary hypothesis was met and there were no significant adverse events. The results showed an incremental advance as it was able to delay type 1 diabetes for 2.5 years in a subset.
Dr. Carla J. Greenbaum, who presented the results, stated that people with close relatives with type 1 diabetes have a 15-fold increased risk of developing the disease themselves.
An earlier study had suggested that if such individuals also had high levels of micro insulin autoantibodies (mIAA), taking oral insulin might buy tim Continue reading

The Big Interview – Charlotte Summers

The Big Interview – Charlotte Summers

We caught up with Charlotte Summers at this year’s Diabetes Professional Care (DPC2017) conference. She is the chief operating officer of Diabetes.co.uk, the world’s largest online diabetes forum, and here she tells The Diabetes Times all about the pioneering Low Carb Program.
What is the Low Carb Program?
The Low Carb Program is a structured, evidence-based digital therapy helping address the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes and obesity. What’s even more exciting is that it’s helping to demonstrate type 2 diabetes and prediabetes don’t have to be chronic, progressive diseases as once understood to be.
Why have more than 250,000 people joined the Low Carb Program, has it filled a void?
We have been astounded by the global impact that the Low Carb Program is having on redefining the understanding of type 2 diabetes. It’s metabolic underpinning and the opportunity to put it into remission. The Diabetes.co.uk forum has been talking about low carb for well over a decade, and it’s been described as a grassroots movement. It truly has been.
In August this year the DT reported that seven out of 10 forum members improved their knowledge of diabetes within six months of joining the online community, have you got any other metrics that you can share?
A recent empirical research study published by Royal Holloway University on the Diabetes.co.uk Forum concluded that being a member of the community was empowering – they went further with this to explain what this meant for someone living with diabetes. It meant they had a better relationship with their hea Continue reading

World Diabetes Day 2017: Important Facts And Significance

World Diabetes Day 2017: Important Facts And Significance


World Diabetes Day 2017: Important Facts And Significance
On account of the celebration of World Diabetes Daythis November 14th, lets try and understand this extremely widespread lifestyle disease that we are dealing with and look into how we might just escape its grasp.
World Diabetes Day is celebrated in order to create awareness about the disease and give the general population an idea about the extreme prevalence of diabetes in todays world. The attention is given to type two diabetes given that it is preventable while explaining the ways by which it can be prevented by anyone.
Every year on November 14, The International Diabetes Federation along with the World Health Organisation celebrates the World Diabetes Day to propagate the above-mentioned features for public benefit.
November 14th is the day chosen to celebrate this because it is the birthday of one of the founders for the treatment of the disease- the co-founder of insulin- Frederick Banting. This day was first initiated in 1991.
On this day every year, various programs including campaigns via different media- television, radio and newspapers, screening programs free of charge, marathons and other awareness methods such as skits, street plays, flash mobs, etc take place worldwide to ensure maximum knowledge is created about the disease.
Every year, a different theme is focused upon so as to cover every aspect of this disease. This year the theme is Women and Diabetes- our right to a healthy feature. Previous themes have covered healthy eating, care for the eyes and so on.
Diabetes is a chronic (long-l Continue reading

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