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Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes doctors: Which specialists treat diabetes?

Diabetes doctors: Which specialists treat diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that affects a person's blood sugar levels and can require various treatments. Understanding which doctors help treat diabetes can simplify the process, making it less stressful.
This article helps people with diabetes to understand the key differences between the various diabetes specialists.
It also covers some common guidelines to follow for visiting each of these experts, to ensure you get the most out of your treatment.
Which doctors help with treating diabetes?
There are a number of diabetes specialists who may be involved in treating someone with this common condition.
As each of these specialists has a slightly different role, there are some key things to be aware of before seeing each one.
General care physicians
A general care physician will often help in the treatment of people with diabetes. Regular check-ups will usually be carried out once every 3 to 4 months.
If there is anything outside their area of expertise, a general care physician will frequently send an individual to an endocrinologist first of all.
Endocrinologists
The most common specialists in the field of diabetes are endocrinologists.
Endocrinologists specialize in the glands of the body, and the hormones that are produced from those glands.
The pancreas is a gland that comes under the spotlight when managing diabetes. It produces insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. In the case of people with diabetes, insulin is either not produced or does not work properly.
People with type 1 diabetes are put under the care of an endocrinologist most of the time. People with type 2 d Continue reading

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Diabetes in Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes in Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes can’t be cured, it can be managed very successfully.
Diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes,” is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy.
To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process.
The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the body’s cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things:
• Glucose: essential fuel for the body’s cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body.
• Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a “gatekeeper” that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel.
What is diabetes?
With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isn’t working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms:
• Insulin-deficiency diabetes—This is when the dog’s body isn’t producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is Continue reading

High Cost Of Diabetes Drugs Often Goes Overlooked

High Cost Of Diabetes Drugs Often Goes Overlooked

When it comes to treating chronic conditions, diabetes drugs aren't nearly as sexy as say, Sovaldi, last year's breakthrough hepatitis C drug that offers a cure for the chronic liver infection at a price approaching six figures.
Yet an estimated 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes — about 10 times the number of people with hepatitis C — and many of them will take diabetes drugs for the rest of their lives. Cost increases for both old and new drugs are forcing many to scramble to pay for them.
"Every week I see patients who can't afford their drugs," says Dr. Joel Zonszein, an endocrinologist who's director of the clinical diabetes center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City.
Although some of the top-selling diabetes drugs like metformin are modestly priced generics, new brand-name drugs continue to be introduced that act in different ways to control blood sugar. They may be more effective and have fewer side effects, but the advances come at a price.
For the fourth year in a row, per person spending on diabetes drugs in 2014 was higher than it was for any other class of traditional drug, according to the Express Scripts 2014 drug trend report. Fewer than half of the prescriptions filled for diabetes treatments were generic.
"The cost of diabetes treatment has been increasing pretty rapidly," says Dr. Glen Stettin, senior vice president for clinical, research and new solutions at Express Scripts, which manages the pharmacy benefits for many companies.
An analysis of per capita health care spending in 2013 for people with diabetes found average costs were Continue reading

6 Emergency Complications of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes.
Heart Attack
Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately:
Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning
Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms
Shortness of breath
Nausea or lightheadedness
Stroke
If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include:
Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body
Feeling confused
Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination
Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason
Nerve Damage
People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss Continue reading

Blood sugar spikes: Causes, symptoms, and prevention

Blood sugar spikes: Causes, symptoms, and prevention

Diabetes is a disease that causes a person's blood sugar to become too high. This can lead to various complications. A person with diabetes must be careful to keep their blood sugar levels under control.
Glucose comes from the food we eat. It is the main source of energy for the body.
The pancreas secretes substances, including the hormone insulin, and enzymes. Enzymes break down food. Insulin makes it possible for body cells to absorb the glucose we consume.
With diabetes, either the pancreas is unable to produce insulin to help the glucose get into the body cells, or the body becomes resistant to the insulin. The glucose stays in the blood instead.
This is what raises blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is known as hyperglycemia.
Contents of this article:
Causes of blood sugar spikes
People with diabetes have to be especially careful about keeping their blood sugar levels under control.
There are several reasons why blood glucose levels may spike. These are:
Sleep: A lack of sleep can be especially bad for people with diabetes, because it can also raise blood sugar levels. One study performed on Japanese men found that getting under 6.5 hours of sleep each night increases a person's risk for high blood glucose levels. Prioritizing healthy sleep and promoting sleep hygiene are good habits for everyone, but especially for people with diabetes.
Stress: When under a lot of stress, the body produces hormones that make it difficult for insulin to do its job, so more glucose stays in the bloodstream. Finding a way to keep stress levels down, such as yoga or meditation, is essen Continue reading

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