diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends.
Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team.
Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you
keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges
prevent or delay diabetes problems
feel good and have more energy
What foods can I eat if I have diabetes?
You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes.
The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines.
The food groups are
vegetables
nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes
starchy: includes potat Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
How Does Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Does Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Diabetes, one of the most prevalent, uncontrolled and life threatening diseases, affects millions of Americans daily. It is important to know that diabetes, while it affects the entire body in different ways, has many signs and symptoms that appear in the legs and feet first. Good control of diabetes is the key to avoiding many of these risk factors associated with the disease.
One of the biggest and scariest risks of uncontrolled diabetes is amputation. There are many ways to control and overcome diabetes so that something as major as an amputation can be avoided.
Below are the three most important aspects of a diabetic foot examination. A thorough examination of these factors by your foot doctor can help prevent many minor and major foot problems.
Blood Flow
Uncontrolled diabetes affects blood flow in the legs and feet. It can cause blockages of small and large vessels leading to many different problems including pain, swelling and wounds that do not heal properly.
A very quick and simple test, where your physician simply feels the pulses of your foot and ankle, can provide a lot of important information. This test can tell whether a major artery is pumping, if it’s weak or not pumping at all- just by a simple touch. Other simple tests, if necessary, are also preformed with ultrasound and other diagnostic tools to look deeper into blood flow of the legs and feet.
Nerve Function
Peripheral neuropathy, or the abnormal function of nerves in the legs and feet, is also very common among diabetic patients. Due to the excess sugar in the body, the nerves start to act up. You c Continue reading

GPs need to tell people they can get rid of type 2 diabetes through weight loss – nutrition expert

GPs need to tell people they can get rid of type 2 diabetes through weight loss – nutrition expert

GPs need to tell people they can get rid of type 2 diabetes through weight loss – nutrition expert
September 14, 2017 8.54am EDT
Every working day, GPs in the UK diagnose almost 1,000 people with type 2 diabetes. It is one of the commonest and most expensive diseases. What most people don’t know is that with a bit of hard work, it is possible to become non-diabetic again.
Formerly limited to older people, type 2 diabetes is now common in younger, fatter, people in their 40s and 50s, and even younger ones who are severely obese. Some people are spared, but the epidemic of diabetes has closely followed the epidemic of overweight and obesity. The key is where the excess fat is stored: if it can no longer be stored under the skin, and starts to accumulate in the liver and pancreas, these organs malfunction to cause diabetes.
The conventional conversation with a GP used to go: “Your blood test confirms that you have diabetes.” And then, “Don’t worry, it’s mild diabetes and we can treat it with tablets.” That advice is horribly wrong.
Patients deserve a fuller, more honest explanation: “You are right to be concerned. Type 2 diabetes is a ghastly, progressively destructive disease. It leads to disabling painful complications, as the main cause of amputations, blindness and kidney failure, and contributes importantly to heart disease and dementia. Oh, and the tablets reduce your blood glucose but allow the disease to progress, so you will still die five to eight years younger.”
We now hope to add: “But if we can help you with an evidence-based programme to los Continue reading

America is Number 1 - in Diabetes Costs

America is Number 1 - in Diabetes Costs

Everyone likes being #1, and Americans are no exception. However, few Americans will be celebrating that they have the world’s highest out of pocket costs for insulin and other life-saving diabetes supplies.
T1International Survey: Out-Of-Pocket Costs
Without accounting for average monthly income, the USA ‘won’ first place in our cost survey by a wide margin. It even ‘beat’ war-torn Syria, a place where access to diabetes supplies is disrupted by bombings and blockades.
Our US respondents told us they paid, on average, $571.69 per month on diabetes costs. This included an average:
$90.84 per vial on rapid-acting insulin
$120.55 per vial on long-acting insulin
$31.95 on one pod of 50 test strips
$30.47 on one pot of ketone strips
$81.67 on a glucagon emergency shot
Insurance Doesn’t Cut It
Even with insurance, many Americans are spending around half their after tax income on insulin and other supplies they need to stay alive: “Insurance helps but it is 9k a year for a 30k year salary.”
That is, when your insurance company allows you to get what you need. For many respondents, insurance companies actively stop them from getting more diabetes supplies. All of this has consequences.
“Insurance companies do not care if I use all of my insulin or strips before they can refill it for me. It puts me in a struggle of blood sugars versus insurance.”
The situation is so out of control many Americans with type 1 diabetes would save thousands by moving to a comparatively less wealthy country with lower costs, such as Argentina or Chile. Even in countries with no out Continue reading

History of diabetes: Past treatments and new discoveries

History of diabetes: Past treatments and new discoveries

Diabetes is a condition characterized by high blood sugar levels. It affects millions of people around the world. Research into diabetes is ongoing but diabetes is simple to manage for most people.
Since diabetes was first discovered, there have been huge improvements in the way it is treated. This article looks at the history of diabetes and how these treatments developed.
Contents of this article:
Diabetes affects blood sugar levels
The body gets energy from sugar (glucose), which is broken down from the food people eat. Diabetes affects insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas that helps in the process of using this sugar efficiently.
People with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin. People who have type 2 diabetes do produce insulin, but their body is unable to use it efficiently.
When a person has diabetes, the lack of insulin or the body's inability to use it properly, causes sugar to stay in the blood rather than entering the cells to be used for energy. This excess sugar in the blood results in higher than normal blood sugar levels.
Having high blood sugar levels for an extended period can cause serious and even life-threatening problems. However, there are many ways the condition can be managed so that these problems are avoided.
Early science around diabetes
Understanding the history of diabetes and how it was first treated can help us to appreciate how well it is understood and managed today.
Discovery of diabetes
The full name for diabetes is diabetes mellitus. This term comes from the Greek word "diabetes" (to siphon or pass through) and the Lat Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

    Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn ...

  • Can eating too much sugar cause type 2 diabetes?

    Olivia Yang was stunned when she learned she had type 2 diabetes six years ago, when she was 19. Her doctor was shocked, too. In fact, her physician tested her twice to be sure there wasn’t some mistake. Yang was young, had a normal weight for her 5-foot-2-inch frame, and didn’t consider herself a particularly bad eater. She certainly didn’t seem like someone at risk. Now a new study may hin ...

  • Can you get diabetes from eating too much sugar?

    Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ong ...

  • Eating with Diabetes: Desserts and Sweets

    I’d be willing to bet that most everyone has been told—and therefore believes—that people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, hone ...

  • Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

    Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar either because of the inability of the body to produce enough insulin or the inability to respond to the insulin so produced. It is classified as follows: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Glucose is the primary energy source in humans and its levels are majorly regulated by pancreatic insulin. Insulin faci ...

  • If I Have Diabetes, Will I Have to Stop Eating Sugar?

    What is that saying? Everything is good but only in moderation? Well this rings true when it comes to eating sugar with diabetes too. You probably already know that eating a lot of sugar is not great for your body. The problem is that sugar comes in a natural form and in an added form, so sometimes you have no idea that you are consuming it. Also, it is in many foods that you don’t even think to ...

  • 9 Foods You Should Be Eating for Type 2 Diabetes

    1 / 10 Healthy Food Choices for Type 2 Diabetes Paying attention to what you eat is essential for controlling your weight and blood glucose levels when you have type 2 diabetes. While this means knowing which foods to limit or avoid, it’s just as important to know which foods are the most beneficial to you — and how to include them in your meal planning. “When it comes to eating a healthy di ...

  • Eating with Diabetes: What About Fruit?

    The Best Fruit Choices for People with Diabetes Packed with vitamins, minerals, and fiber, fruit should be part of any healthy diet. As a diabetes educator, some of the most frequent questions from my clients have to do with fruit. Can I still eat fruit? How much fruit should I eat? What are the best fruits for someone with diabetes? Most people with diabetes are worried about eating fruit because ...

  • Type 2 diabetes IS reversible: Eating just 600 calories a day for 8 weeks can save the lives of millions of sufferers

    Type 2 diabetes can be reversed by going on a low calorie diet, new research shows. Consuming just 600 calories a day for eight weeks can save the lives of millions of sufferers of the preventable condition. Newcastle University scientists said that excess calories lead to a fatty liver, which causes the liver to produce too much glucose. The excess fat is then passed to the pancreas, which causes ...

Related Articles