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Diabetes Caregiver's Daily Care Checklist

Diabetes Caregiver's Daily Care Checklist

Diabetes Caregiver's Daily Care Checklist


Helping someone take care of her diabetes doesn't just make her feel better. It helps her avoid common diet, foot, and mouth problems. Use this checklist for top-notch daily care.
Most people with diabetes already have their own daily routines. Some dont need any help at all -- some need reminders and prompts. But if youre a new caregiver or family member, these are good things for you to know.
She is in charge of keeping her blood sugar levels healthy. She might already be keeping a daily record of her blood glucose readings, medicine schedule, exercise , meals, and how she feels. She might be working with her doctor to look for patterns from month to month and let her doctor know about them.
When she wants to exercise , note that she should wait an hour or so after eating, when blood sugar is likely higher. Its always a good idea to pack glucose tablets or a carbohydrate snack, plenty of water, and a diabetes ID tag or card when she exercises away from home. She should also check her blood glucose before, during, and after exercise.
Stress can affect her blood sugar. Some daily activities that might help her ease stress: walking, deep breathing exercises, gardening, meditation , listening to music, or working on a hobby.
If she has problems being able to do any of these things herself -- from monitoring blood sugar to taking medications -- you might be able to help.
People with diabetes are more likely to have problems in their mouths -- like gum disease , fungus, and dry mouth . That's why mouth care is so important. They should brush with a soft-bristled brush a Continue reading

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Bloating, Constipation and Diabetes: How I Fixed My Stomach Problems

Bloating, Constipation and Diabetes: How I Fixed My Stomach Problems


Bloating, Constipation and Diabetes: How I Fixed My Stomach Problems
Do you ever feel like the food you eat is working against you? Ive been suffering from severe bloating and constipation for years. It got so bad it was significantly impacting my health and happiness.
Ive seen an amazing amount of doctors and gastroenterologists. Ive been put through a lot of tests and prescribed all sorts of medication without any of it truly helping. It wasnt until recently I finally found the root cause of my problems and my symptoms (mostly) disappeared.
I tell you: its a brand new, happier, and more comfortable world for me!
After all the specialists I have seen, it ended up being my hubby who found the right diagnosis though Google searching my symptoms. Usually, I REALLY dont recommend this approach, but the medical system had quite frankly failed me this time.
It turns out I have a FODMAP intolerance. By doing a 6-week elimination of specific foods and a 4-week reintroduction, Ive been able to identify the foods my body disagrees with and eliminate or reduce them in my diet.
Now almost all of my digestive issues have been resolved (!).
FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides, And Polyols.
In simpler terms, FODMAPs are carbohydrates (sugars) found in some foods. The issue for people intolerant to FODMAPs is that these sugars can be poorly absorbed in the small intestine and start fermenting with bacteria creating gas (here comes the bloat). They can also give other symptoms like constipation or diarrhea.
The tricky part is that not a Continue reading

Effect of medicinal mushrooms on blood cells under conditions of diabetes mellitus

Effect of medicinal mushrooms on blood cells under conditions of diabetes mellitus


Effect of medicinal mushrooms on blood cells under conditions of diabetes mellitus
Taras Vitak , Borys Yurkiv , Solomon Wasser , Eviatar Nevo , and Natalia Sybirna
Taras Vitak, Borys Yurkiv, Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, Faculty of Natural Science, University of Haifa, Haifa 3498838, Israel
Solomon Wasser, Institute of Evolution and Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, Faculty of Natural Science, University of Haifa, Haifa 3498838, Israel
Eviatar Nevo, Institute of Evolution, Faculty of Natural Science, University of Haifa, Haifa 3498838, Israel
Natalia Sybirna, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Lviv 79005, Ukraine
Author contributions: Vitak T and Yurkiv B wrote the manuscript; Wasser S, Nevo E and Sybirna N reviewed and edited the manuscript.
Correspondence to: Taras Vitak, PhD, Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, Faculty of Natural Science, University of Haifa, Abba Khoushy Ave 199, Haifa 3498838, Israel. [email protected]
Received 2016 Oct 28; Revised 2017 Feb 13; Accepted 2017 Mar 12.
Copyright The Author(s) 2017. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.
This article is an open-access article which was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on dif Continue reading

The Worst Myth about Diabetes

The Worst Myth about Diabetes

Will your type 2 diabetes get progressively worse? It will if you follow the advice of most doctors.
But you don’t have to go there.
People believe many diabetes myths, so many in fact that Riva Greenberg wrote a book on the subject, “50 Diabetes Myths That Can Ruin Your Life.” Yet she missed the most pernicious one: that diabetes is a progressive disease. It’s the worst one that people with type 2 diabetes face because it can be a self-fulfilling prophecy. So when HealthCentral.com deemed the first week in April as myth-busting week, I jumped at the chance to write about it.
Some basis in truth
Like many myths, this one has some basis in truth. Ever since the findings of the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) appeared 22 years ago, we have known that diabetes medication eventually fails to keep us well. This landmark study is the best known and longest prospective trial, accumulating almost 20 years’ worth of data.
A subsequent study, A Diabetes Outcome Progression Trial (ADOPT), summarized the key UKPDS findings this way:
The study found that when people took their prescribed glucose-lowering therapies — including metformin, any of the sulfonylureas, or insulin — they usually were able to improve their blood glucose control in the short term. But they didn’t stop a progressive failure of the islet cells of the pancreas that produce the body’s insulin. The result was a progressive failure in maintaining blood glucose control.
Based on an assumption
The myth that type 2 diabetes gets progressively worse as we age is based entirely on an assu Continue reading

What causes type 1 diabetes? Lessons from animal models

What causes type 1 diabetes? Lessons from animal models


What causes type 1 diabetes? Lessons from animal models
From Bartholin Instituttet, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen and Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark
Karsten Buschard, MD, Bartholin Instituttet, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. e-mail: [email protected]
Re-use of this article is permitted in accordance with the Terms and Conditions set out at http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/onlineopen#OnlineOpen_Terms
Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer
Re-use of this article is permitted in accordance with the Creative Commons Deed, Attribution 2.5, which does not permit commercial exploitation.
To study type 1 diabetes (T1D), excellent animal models exist, both spontaneously diabetic and virus-induced. Based on knowledge from these, this review focuses on the environmental factors leading to T1D, concentrated into four areas which are: (1) The thymus-dependent immune system: T1D is a T cell driven disease and the beta cells are destroyed in an inflammatory insulitis process. Autoimmunity is breakdown of self-tolerance and the balance between regulator T cells and aggressive effector T cells is disturbed. Inhibition of the T cells (by e.g. anti-CD3 antibody or cyclosporine) will stop the T1D process, even if initiated by virus. Theoretically, the risk from immunotherapy elicits a higher frequency of malignancy. (2) The activity of the beta cells: Resting beta cells display less antigenicity and are less sensitive to immune destruction. Beta-cell Continue reading

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