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Diabetes Basics For Family And Friends

Diabetes Basics for Family and Friends

Diabetes Basics for Family and Friends

There are few things more misunderstood than diabetes. It’s a disease that can seem simple from a casual distance (oh, it means you can’t have sugar, and you’d probably be just fine if you lost a few pounds), while in truth it is a very complex condition — actually, several fairly different complex conditions that all happen to be called “diabetes.” It seems like it’s a disease that’s mentioned all over the place, but it’s still rare enough that relatively few people ever really learn what it really is.
So today I’m going to offer this column anyone who finds themselves in the social orbit of someone living with diabetes. Consider this your Diabetes 101: Intro to ‘betes.
1. There are two main types of diabetes, and they’re not the same.
OK, this is an important one. Diabetes is really several different diseases. Both main types involve the body’s ability to metabolize sugar, but the causes are very different. And the treatments can be very different. Some of my most irritating experiences as a Type 1 diabetic have been when someone who knows someone with Type 2 decides to start giving me advice or telling me I shouldn’t be eating something. And I’m not alone here — everyone I’ve talked to with Type 1 has had the same experience, and it drives them crazy, too.
There is one important physiological distinction you should understand. In Type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s beta cells, which produce insulin. Insulin is what the body needs to transfer sugar from the bloodstream to the body’s many cells (which use t Continue reading

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WHAT IS DIABETES?

WHAT IS DIABETES?

WHAT IS DIABETES?
Diabetes is a condition in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or is not able to use the insulin effectively. As a result, the glucose in the blood (often called blood sugar) becomes too high.
HOW COMMON IS DIABETES?
There are 29.1 million Americans who have the condition, of which 8 million do not know that they have diabetes. The number of people with diabetes has increased along with the number of people who are overweight or obese. Diabetes is more common among minorities such as blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans and Native Americans. People can get diabetes at any age, but the risk increases as we get older. It is estimated that in 2014, nearly 25 percent of people over the age of 65 have diabetes. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational (je-sta-shen-al) diabetes.
TYPES OF DIABETES
Type 1 diabetes (previously also known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes)
Type 1 diabetes develops because the cells that produce insulin (beta cells) are destroyed by an immune process, and the body, therefore, is unable to produce sufficient amounts of insulin. Only about five to 10 percent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes typically occurs in children and young adults, but may occur at any age. So even if you are 90 years of age, you can develop juvenile diabetes!
Type 2 diabetes (previously also known as adult onset diabetes or non-insulin dependent diabetes)
Type 2 diabetes develops because the body is unable to effectively use the insulin that it produces. Type 2 diabetes ty Continue reading

New metformin may help more patients with type 2 diabetes

New metformin may help more patients with type 2 diabetes

A new study shows that the glucose-lowering effect of metformin - a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes - takes place in the gut and not in the bloodstream.
The revelation, published in the journal Diabetes Care, means that a delayed-release form of metformin that the researchers tested could suit the 40% of type 2 diabetes patients who cannot use the current formulation.
Metformin (short for metformin hydrochloride, also known as Glucophage and other brand names) has been used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes for nearly 60 years.
Despite the drug's veteran status, scientists are not exactly sure how and where in the body most of its glucose-lowering effect takes place.
The new study, led by the University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill, provides strong evidence that metformin does most of its work in the gut, and not in the bloodstream, as many had assumed.
First author John Buse, a professor of medicine, says:
"Our clinical trials show that metformin works largely in the lower intestine, reversing half a century of conventional thinking."
In their paper, the team describes how they carried out a phase 1 and a phase 2 trial of the experimental drug Metformin Delayed Release (Metformin DR). Prof. Buse says:
"These studies provide evidence that delivering Metformin DR to the lower bowel significantly reduces the amount of metformin in the blood, while maintaining its glucose-lowering effect."
Trials show Metformin DR may suit kidney-impaired patients
One of the main reasons metformin is not suitable for all patients with type 2 diabetes is because it c Continue reading

Diabetes-Friendly Party Drink Recipes

Diabetes-Friendly Party Drink Recipes

Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people.
Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people.
Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people.
Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people.
Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people. Continue reading

Dr. Oz’s Anti-Diabetes Drink

Dr. Oz’s Anti-Diabetes Drink

Directions
Mix water and vinegar together in drinking glass. Pour psyllium husk fiber into glass and stir. Drink every day before dinner to prevent the sugar spike and crash before bed.
Tried this recipe? Log in to DoctorOz.com to rate it and find more recipes just for you. Continue reading

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